Tag Archives: Jobs

Payrise for low-wage workers in aged care and home support #genderpaygap

About 55,000 low-paid workers, mainly women, are about to get one of the biggest pay rises ever after details of a historic pay equity settlement are revealed today. The deal will cost the Government more than $500 million a year when fully implemented in five years, assuming it is signed off by union members and the Cabinet. The settlement will mean hefty pay increases from July in three government-funded service sectors which employ mainly women on low rates: aged residential care, home support, disability services. Prime Minister Bill English says today’s historic pay equity deal is likely to have ramifications for the private sector. –NZ Herald

At Facebook:

The Herald understands that for the primary litigant, rest home caregiver Kristine Bartlett, it will mean an increase from about $16 an hour to about $23 an hour, more than 43 per cent. […] The case is the first legal settlement in New Zealand that recognises that some jobs pay less because they are done mainly by women. […] The Service and Food Workers’ Union lodged a claim on Bartlett’s behalf with the Employment Relations Authority in 2012. […] The union took the case on behalf of Bartlett and 14 other union members of the 110 employed by Terranova rest home. Their wages were effectively set by the government subsidy paid by the Ministry of Health for rest home services. The case was elevated to the Employment Court, Court of Appeal and Supreme Court. But once the Court of Appeal confirmed that pay equity cases could be heard under the Equal Pay Act of 1972, the Government stepped into the process because it was loath to leave a case with such far-reaching repercussions solely in the court’s hands.

At Twitter:

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A U D I O

### radionz.co.nz Tue, 18 March 2017 at 8:11 a.m.
Morning Report with Susie Ferguson and Guyon Espiner
money life and society
Low-paid women are at parliament today for an announcement on pay
Tax specialist Deborah Russell says an announcement today on a reported big pay rise for women in low-paid work.
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (4′40″)

The New Zealand GST burden:

### radionz.co.nz Tue, 18 March 2017 at 8:15 a.m.
Morning Report with Susie Ferguson and Guyon Espiner
economy
NZ wage earners among the lowest taxed in OECD
A new report from the OECD shows out of 35 countries New Zealand and Chile workers are taxed the least, and those in Belguim and France the most. As Patrick O’Meara report, this comes as the Government considers tax cuts for low and middle income workers.
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (3′50″)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

7 Comments

Filed under Business, Democracy, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, New Zealand, People, Politics, Public interest

***Pssst #Delta CEO Grady replaced

An INTERNAL appointment has been made for the position of Chief Executive Officer at Delta Utility Services Ltd.

Which likely means few external executives with relevant experience wanted to apply for lead position in the ‘degraded’ council-owned company —but then, not many executives were left internally. What does that say…….

Related Post and Comments:
5.3.17 Seeking the New Grady #Delta

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

10 Comments

Filed under Aurora Energy, Business, Central Otago, Construction, CST, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, Democracy, Dunedin, DVL, DVML, Economics, Electricity, Finance, Geography, Health & Safety, Housing, Infrastructure, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Queenstown Lakes, Resource management, SFO, Stadiums, Travesty, What stadium

Seeking the New Grady #Delta

(try to ignore that sick feeling)

https://www.seek.co.nz/job/32939468

delta-ceo-seek-co-nz-job-32939468

Advt also at Otago Daily Times, Saturday, 4 Feb 2017
(Employment, page 51)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

36 Comments

Filed under Aurora Energy, Business, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, Dunedin, Economics, Electricity, Finance, Geography, Health, Infrastructure, New Zealand, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Travesty, What stadium

COMPLETE Dis-satisfaction with DCC, DCHL, DVML, DVL, Delta….

marigold-tweaked-by-whatifdunedin-cdn-guardian-ng

Fake it til you make it, and hey, don’t lift the marigolds.

Sorry Daaave, looks like a D for your council’s governance. —Actually, for the avoidance of euphemism, make that D- and lower for DIRE Performance, accompanying Drivel, and Diabolical treatment of Residents and Ratepayers in the aftermath of emergency situations.

Listening to Yes People and your dwindling voter base isn’t your best hope to resolve ongoing multimillion-dollar losses being sustained by a couple of the council-owned companies, to the point where the holding company led by chairman Crombie, fronts with a “qualified audit” only on presentation of its annual report(?) to Council.

[In July 2015 Graham Crombie was appointed to the Commerce Commission as an Associate Commissioner for a five year term.]

Damages to employment, liveability and opportunity in a No-growth city keep stacking.

“It is also yet another example of good public service jobs being lost from our smaller towns and cities.” –PSA spokeswoman

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Oct 2016
ACC jobs to go in Dunedin
By Vaughan Elder
After consulting with staff since June, the decision had been made to relocate all the roles over the next 12 to 18 months to the larger Christchurch office and have “one centre for consistent customer and rehabilitation services across the Southern region”.
Read more

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Asked about people who continued to be negative about the city, he said: “Negativity is an attitude, it’s not a fact.”

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Oct 2016
Survey ‘shows Dunedin on right track’
By Vaughan Elder
A survey showing Dunedin residents feel increasingly positive about their city shows the city is on the “right track”, Mayor Dave Cull says. […] the annual survey was not all good news. Last year’s June flood was picked as a reason for increasing dissatisfaction with the city’s stormwater system [down 13 points to 43%]. Satisfaction rates also fell when it came to public toilets, the suitability of the city’s roads for cycling and the availability of parks in the central city.
Read more

[Chief executive Sue Bidrose] said some of the areas where there had been negative results this year and in past surveys correlated to negative media coverage in the Otago Daily Times.

*1577 survey responses from 5400 residents randomly selected from the electoral roll,

The Talking Head (without helmet, unprepared)

█ Dunedin City Council (media release)
Residents’ Opinion Survey released 12 Oct 2016. Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: cdn.guardian.ng – marigold, tweaked by whatifdunedin

6 Comments

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Jafas, come hither…. it’s alright here if warped

Douglas Field Published on Jan 7, 2016
Climate Change Panic 8 1 16
‘Green’ Mayor Cull panics over floods in Dunedin and blames ‘climate change’ and sea level rise as the cause. Promptly debunked by local climatologist and hydrologist as absurd.

Commenting at ODT Online
macfod, unduly negative and downcast —not a local economist like John Christie (Enterprise Dunedin), or a Terence Davies (DVML) – who place reliance on bought multipliers to talk up sweet virtue and powers of attraction.
blip blurp blop

Dave Cull couldn’t sell toffee
Submitted by macfod on Fri, 08/01/2016 – 7:33am.

Oh my god, what a big draw it would be saying that we have places such as ..

Cadburys – a factory! Farmers Market and bacon butties – a joke! Museum – visit it once only. St Clair beach – it’s eroding and DCC are doing nothing about it.

What [they] are promoting [is] where they have spent money . . . stadium – unused cycle lanes. I love Dunedin but get so frustrated that we are not growing and not attracting jobs..

Aucklanders are already buying our property, but as investments as the rental returns at approx 8% make it good business.
Read more

New Zealand Herald: Dunners in drive for Jafas to roll down to Deep South

INFLUX….
jaffa-race Dunedin Cadbury Chocolate Festival [dunedinnz.com]

Jafa is a slang term (usually pejorative) for a resident of Auckland, New Zealand. It is the acronym for Just Another Fucking Aucklander. The term is also misspelled as Jaffa, a chocolate confection from Dunedin.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: dunedinnz.com – Jaffa Race, Baldwin Street

alright ● all right ● alright ● all right ● alright ● all right ● alright

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Filed under Business, Climate change, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Dunedin, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Geography, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Tourism, Travesty, What stadium

Dunedin schools —population demographics

School mural (detail) SAM_1273-o7jvi2 [macandrewbay.school.nz] 1Mural at Macandrew Bay School (detail)

Solutions proposed by school leaders so far include closing one or more secondary schools in the city, establishing enrolment zones or implementing roll caps.

### ODT Online Wed, 6 May 2015
Schools baulk at roll issue
By John Lewis
The Ministry of Education is being asked to step up and take responsibility for finding a solution to the city’s declining secondary school rolls, rather than asking the schools’ leaders to solve the problem. During the past eight months, secret meetings have been held between Dunedin’s secondary principals, board representatives and the ministry, to see if schools could agree on ways of making the city’s secondary school network more efficient, sustainable and equitable for pupils.
Read more

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“We’re not just getting increases in the number of babies being born locally.” –Richard Newton, principal St Clair School

### ODT Online Thu, 7 May 2015
Migrants boost primary school rolls
By John Lewis
The latest Ministry of Education March roll figures show Dunedin’s primary and intermediate school rolls are the highest they have been in six years, despite the secondary rolls being the lowest in 15 years. The rise in overall rolls appears driven by primary rolls, which have been increasing for the past eight years and have reached their highest point since 2001. Intermediate rolls have been increasing for the past four years.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

Filed under Business, Economics, Geography, Media, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Warning! NZ disposable income down

Link received Mon, 6 Apr 2015 at 1:00 p.m.

█ Message: Wouldn’t read this in local media !!!

### marketoracle.co.uk Apr 05, 2015 – 01:28 PM GMT
Economics / Asian Economies
New Zealand Economy – There’s Trouble Brewing In Middle Earth
By Raul I Meijer
For the second time in three years, I’m fortunate enough to spend some time in New Zealand (or Aotearoa). In 2012, it was all mostly a pretty crazy touring schedule, but this time is a bit quieter. Still get to meet tons of people though, in between the relentless Automatic Earth publishing schedule. And of course people want to ask, once they know what I do, how I think their country is doing.
My answer is I think New Zealand is much better off than most other countries, but not because they’re presently richer (disappointing for many). They’re better off because of the potential here. Which isn’t being used much at all right now. In fact, New Zealand does about everything wrong on a political and macro-economic scale. […] I’ve been going through some numbers today, and lots of articles, and I think I have an idea what’s going on. Thank you to my new best friend Grant here in Northland (is it Kerikeri or Kaikohe?) for providing much of the reading material and the initial spark.
To begin with, official government data. We love those, don’t we, wherever we turn our inquisitive heads. Because no government would ever not be fully open and truthful.

This is from Stuff.co.nz, March 19 2015:
New Zealand GDP grew 3.3% last year

New Zealand’s economy grew 3.3% last year, the fastest since 2007 before the global financial crisis, Statistics NZ said. Most forecasts expect the economy to keep growing this year and next, although slightly more slowly than in the past year. For the three months ended December 31, GDP grew 0.8%, in line with Reserve Bank and other forecasts. That was led by shop sales and accommodation. That sounds great compared to most other nations. But then we find out where the alleged growth has come from (I say alleged because other data cast a serious doubt on the ‘official’ numbers) […] while the economy ostensibly grew by 3.3%, disposable income was down. That’s what you call a warning sign.

….Meijer’s commentary continues in reference to recent New Zealand news stories:

Stuff: Dairy Slump Hits New Zealand Exports To China
Radio NZ: Export Drop Rattles Companies
NZ Herald: World Dairy Prices Slide 10.8% On Supply Concerns
Radio NZ: World ‘Awash With Milk’
NZ Herald: Stress Too Much For Farmers
NZ Herald: Hot Properties: Auckland Valuations Out Of Date Within Months

He ends by citing NZ Herald: New Zealand’s Economic Winds Of Change:

Chaos theory calls it the butterfly effect. It’s the idea that a butterfly flapping its wings in the Amazon could cause a tornado in Texas. The New Zealand economy has plenty of its own butterflies changing the weather for GDP growth, jobs, interest rates, inflation and house prices. [..] One of the flappiest at the moment is the global iron ore price. It’s barely noticed here but it’s an indicator of growing trouble inside our largest trading partner, China, and it is knocking our second-largest partner, Australia, for six. It fell to a 10-year low of almost US$50 a tonne this week and is down from a peak of more than US$170 a tonne in early 2011.
[…] President Xi has reinforced the contrasting effects of the changes in China on Australia and New Zealand by encouraging consumers and investors to spend more of China’s big trade surpluses overseas. Tourism from China was up 40% in the first two months of this year from a year ago, and there remains plenty of demand from investors in China for New Zealand assets.
The dark side of this tornado in New Zealand after the flapping of the butterfly’s wings in China was felt in Nelson this week. The region’s biggest logging trucking firm, Waimea Contract Carriers, was put into voluntary administration owing $14m, partly because of a slump in log exports to China in the past six months.
That’s because New Zealand’s logs are now mostly shipped to China to be timber boxing for the concrete being poured in its new “ghost” cities. The Chinese iron ore butterfly has flapped and now we’re seeing Gold Coast winter breaks become cheaper and logging contracts rarer.

Read full article

Website: http://theautomaticearth.com (provides unique analysis of economics, finance, politics and social dynamics in the context of Complexity Theory)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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