Monthly Archives: February 2013

Tour the old prison in March (2013)

Dunedin PrisonGuided Tours Available $10 per person

Saturday 2 March 10.30am
Tuesday 5 March 5.30pm
Saturday 9 March 10.30pm
Tuesday 12 March 5.30pm
Saturday 16 March 10.30am
Tuesday 19 March 10.30am
Saturday 23 March 10.30am
Tuesday 26 March 10.30am
Saturday 30 March 10.30am

• Tours are limited to 25 persons and last for 1 hour
• No lift access to upper floors, and not suitable for small children

To book and for other information visit www.dunedinprisontrust.co.nz

Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust
65 Every Street, Dunedin 9013, New Zealand
Tel: 64 3 454 5384 Fax: 64 3 454 5364
Stewart Harvey, Chairman
stewarth@orcon.net.nz

Related Posts:
20.8.12 Dunedin Prison: tours next month
6.6.12 Dunedin Prison purchased by trust
18.10.11 Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust – see building history

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stupefied and bought Kiwis (the dirt)

When everybody knows where everybody else’s bodies are buried, setting forth in search of wrong- doing with an ornamental teaspoon arguably makes more sense than marching off with a spade.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 09:01 26/02/2013
Corruption exists by the shovel load
By Chris Trotter – The Press
OPINION: A group of wealthy ranchers and industrialists importunes the man most likely to lead their party to the White House. He hears them out politely, takes a contemplative sip from his glass of whiskey, and replies: “Boys, I’d like to help. But, like every man, I have my price. If you want me to run, it’ll cost you a well-watered ranch in prime cattle country.” The party big-wigs exchange glances and nods. Their spokesman rises from his big leather chair, extends his hand towards the beaming candidate, and exclaims: “Done!”

Now who would you say this politician was? A Texan, surely? Lyndon Baines Johnson? George W Bush? Some corrupt citizen of the Lone Star State where elections were regularly franchised out to party bosses who, when it came to vote-rigging, only ever had one question: “Do you want us to count ’em, or vote ’em?” (Meaning: Do you want us to stuff the ballot boxes, or merely round up the required number of bribed and/or intimidated electors?)

Well, to be honest, this story isn’t about Texan – or even American – politics. I only used words like “ranchers” and “White House” so that you’d have no difficulty in recognising all the behind-the-scenes deal-making for what it was: political corruption.

Had I told you from the beginning that we were talking about New Zealand farmers and businessmen, and that the politician negotiating the price of his co-operation was the future National Party Prime Minister, Keith Holyoake, then you would already be objecting: “So what? That’s not corruption. It’s not illegal to buy somebody a farm!”

I remember my old editor at The Independent Business Weekly, Warren Berryman, shaking his head in wonderment when, once again, some international outfit declared New Zealand to be the least corrupt country on Earth. Warren was born in the United States and had lived what might, euphemistically, be called “a colourful life”.

“This is one of the most corrupt countries I’ve ever lived in”, he told me. “It’s everywhere you look – but you Kiwis just don’t see it. New Zealand tops all these surveys not because it’s corruption-free, but because New Zealanders have become experts at looking at corruption and calling it something else.”

How much longer, I wonder, is the rest of the world going to be hoodwinked by Kiwis’ perverse willingness to substitute an ornamental teaspoon for a spade?
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC meetings —for the record

### ODT Online Tue, 26 Feb 2013
DCC meetings opened to full recording
By Debbie Porteous
The Dunedin public will be able to see local body politicians in action ”warts and all” after city councillors agreed to allow full sound recordings of their meetings. The public, including media, were previously only allowed take photos, notes and video, but not record sound at council meetings. But several resolutions passed by councillors yesterday will allow any person who notifies the chairman at the start of a meeting to record, including video with sound, the public parts of full council, public forum and standing committee meetings.

Council governance manager Sandy Graham told councillors the proposal from staff came after requests from members of the public and media and was something the council’s communications team was also keen on. Councillors had mixed reactions to the proposal.

The council will also record the meetings and make a full, unedited copy of recordings of meetings publicly available. This opens the door to possible live webcasting of meetings in the future.
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DCC homepage portrait nightmares 6.1.13 (screenshot)

POSTSCRIPT
Last updated 27 Feb 2013
What non public records resemble, for the Council’s mammoth debt spending and support to Rugby/ORFU, DVML, Rosebud’s Team at Strategy and Development et al —from the DCC home page today:

DCC homepage image 26-2-13 (1)

Mr Orders, Sir, step out from the shadow – bring with you the (undisclosed) PricewaterhouseCoopers report (file no 2).

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Bank of New Zealand Building, 205 Princes St (cnr Rattray)

Dunedin 1883 blg taken 1976 lowresBNZ Bank, The Exchange 1976

### ODT Online Tue, 26 Feb 2013
New lease of life for BNZ building
By Debbie Porteous
A grand old dame of the Dunedin streetscape is being brought back to life by a Dunedin law firm. The historic Bank of New Zealand Building at the corner of Rattray and Princes Sts, in the Exchange, will, come June, be home to commercial law firm Van Aart Sycamore Lawyers, after the company bought the building and is having it renovated. BNZ main entry detail - City WalksFirm directors Michael Van Aart and Tony Sycamore said they were looking for permanent premises and the building’s location, natural light and character had appealed. Mr Sycamore said he expected the building would be “a really nice place to work”. The location was also great. Buildings around the Exchange area were filling up with commercial tenants, in what was historically the commercial heart of Dunedin. The company’s 14 staff would be based on the first floor, and once they had moved in the firm hoped to find tenants for the other three floors.

The company was strengthening the building from 67% of code to 100%, and installing full fire sprinkler systems throughout, as well as renovating and fitting out new offices, while retaining the heritage features of the building preserved by previous owner Ted Daniels.

The company was working closely with the Dunedin City Council and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust on the refurbishment.
Read more

Heritage New Zealand – Category 1 Historic Place
(No. 7299) Registration Report – the history and significance

The Bank of New Zealand Building was designed and constructed over the period 1877-1883. The architect, William Barnett Armson, was one of the first colonially-trained architects to work in New Zealand. He trained at Melbourne in architecture, engineering and surveying, and returned to New Zealand in 1862. The building is considered to be the architect’s masterpiece, and New Zealand’s finest surviving nineteenth century bank.

Dunedin interior built 1883 lowresInterior, before alterations circa 1960. Campbell Photography, Dunedin

The bank is elsewhere described as one of the few New Zealand buildings to reflect the large scale of the sixteenth century Italian palazzo, its prototype. The richly carved exterior features New Zealand plants and landscapes carved by Louis John Godfrey. The interior was extensively modernised by the architects Mandeno and Fraser in 1958 but the superb plaster ceiling over the banking chamber was preserved.

Dunedin Ceiling 1883 lowresCeiling, main banking chamber

Related Post:
27.7.13 Heritage: Old BNZ, Dunedin —restored

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: BNZ Archives, Wellington (via Ted Daniels); Athol Parks, citywalks.co.nz

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DCC binge spending alert: Proposed South Dunedin cycle network

UPDATED POST 27.2.13
If there is no [NZTA] subsidy, the cost will be $70.6 million.
See further comment by JimmyJones based on statements in DCC annual plans.

Comment received.

JimmyJones
Submitted on 2013/02/24 at 5:55 pm

That could be, Hype O’Thermia. Perhaps the intracranial aphids explain why they keep getting their financial estimates so badly wrong.
It seems to me that the Team has been working on this for a few years and waiting for a few cycling deaths to help with the promotion of their ideas. The amount of publicity given to these deaths has been far beyond what is typical for previous cycling deaths and very different to the average pedestrian and motor vehicle death. No doubt the Team has good links with the ODT and it helps to have control of the $5 million Spin-doctor Machine. One of those is perfect for persuading the councillors that your ideological brain-explosions won’t cost much and that everyone will like them eventually.
As Elizabeth mentioned, election success can be greatly enhanced by the timing of a cycle-way media promotion, if this is part of your policy. There need not be collusion for this to happen: the Rosebud Team are very focused on their goals and know the value of getting the best people elected that share their ideology. It’s symbiotic self interest, and (probably) not corruption. The good of the Team is the important thing, far more important than the City and the People.

[ends]

Visit the discussion on this thread:
DCC: Council meeting agenda and reports for 25 February 2013

Report – Council – 25/02/2013 (PDF, 1.5 MB)
South Dunedin Cycle Network

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Walk this way – Aerosmith to play stadium

Received from Rob Hamlin
Monday, 25 February 2013 11:37 p.m.

Best do this quickly quickly as there is one major oddity that has not yet been picked up here. Aerosmith are performing here on April 24 – that’s only weeks away. How long was Elton coming – months/years – that’s the usual lead time for acts of this size, and with good reason. People have to decide to come, make plans, book tickets, hotels etc, in plenty of time. The same applies for preparation in the venue and destination, especially if it’s a small one like Dunedin – eg extra flight capacity. More importantly, the tours themselves are major logistical exercises that have itineraries that are usually planned years in advance.

So what’s happened here? Did they lose a venue at short notice? It certainly hasn’t been reported if they did. Then why the devil are the promoters diverting a major act at considerable inconvenience, cost and at very short notice in our direction.

I suppose that we will be told that it was for the love of the Foobar. However, major events promotion is a hard and chancy business that allows those who play the game successfully over the long term little room for love other than that for money. So my call is that they are coming for money – a lot of it, well over and above their expenses, and guaranteed as well.

I suppose that 40,000 people at $100 a head and no charge for the Stadium, plus help with the travel costs (maybe $450,000 or so that DVML just happened to have come by recently will be a factor here) might deliver a $4 million profit for a few days work – which might interest them.

Maybe the 40,000 will not come, or they will not pay $100. That’s OK, there’s still the guarantee – often innocuously referred to as an ‘event underwrite’. This underwriter is a third party who agrees to cough the agreed amount of revenue if the punters won’t. Some may recall North Island Councils losing their shirts this way before. Is this event underwritten as part of the agreement with DVML? I would be surprised if it wasn’t – Who’s underwriting it? Easy – DVML don’t have that kind of cash. So, got a mirror handy?

Holding big events in small towns is a risky business. Holding them at such very short notice makes it even riskier. That’s why I really don’t think that these guys are taking a risk of this nature. If they aren’t, then we are instead. Maybe we’ll roll the dice and not get burnt this time. But we will eventually if this is indeed what is going on. I would suspect that at a minimum the $450,000 that DVML were recently given by DCC as strategic fund is already well spent. But Darren did say he might (would) be back for more pretty soon.

It’s suddenly getting pretty crowded at the Foobar Multi-Purpose Community Asset innit? Hardly room for Rugby any longer these days. Fifa’s still in the loop with private meetings with our Councillors too – could still be a double booking in the offing. Still no contract with the Highlanders/ORFU and DVML? Now, I wouldn’t be betting on that if circumstances made it worth their while to have one of a certain type in hand when said double booking actually occurs. However, the turf’s still immaculate down the road at DCC/CS Partnership Point – Lucky, eh?

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Darren Burden’s ratepayer subsidy bubble and other Fubar myths

The Elton John concert at Fubar is lauded by ‘prostadia’ as having generated a $14-15 million spend in Dunedin.

Dunedin Venues Management Ltd (DVML) commissioned Howard Research to ascertain the economic benefit of the sold-out November 2011 concert.

“Of the $14.9 million, $4.6 million was spent on retail shopping, $4 million on food and beverage and $3.4 million on accommodation.” (ODT 11.2.12)

Nobody seriously believes that, except ‘prostadia’.

With each ratepayer-subsidised act or event to appear at the stadium we’re reminded (no, told) of the great windfall that was ‘Elton John’.

Dunedin Venues’ books say differently. With more events being diaried, what happens when the ratepayer subsidy and events fund runs out? What will the city council dream up next to borrow against, or sell?

[Can we hock off Darren and his team of DVML ‘managers’ and their EPAs?]

Aerosmith, Tampa Florida 11.12.12 The Global Warming TourAerosmith at Tampa, Florida (11 December 2012). The Global Warming Tour. B.Moore | Visuals

ODT 25.2.13 Walk this way – Aerosmith to play stadium

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, Concerts, DCC, DVL, DVML, Economics, Events, Fun, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Stadiums