Tag Archives: Human resources

DCC management

ODT editor in chief Barry Stewart at Channel 39 News this evening:

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Aurora Energy at ODT 24.2.17 follows #LGOIMA

Broad spectrum (?!) LGOIMA request from earlier this week and interim acknowledgement:

From: Elizabeth Kerr
Sent: Monday, 20 February 2017 7:24 PM
To: Grady Cameron
Cc: Elizabeth Kerr
Subject: Aurora Energy Ltd – Official Information Request (LGOIMA)

Attention Grady Cameron
Chief Executive, Aurora Energy Ltd

Dear Grady

How is Aurora Energy Ltd funding the $30million pole replacement programme you speak about – from capex (capital expenditure), opex (operational expenditure), a combination of the two? or by other means? (please state)

Will Aurora Energy Ltd attempt to raise line charges for Otago power consumers, to achieve the number of (dangerous) pole replacements required in the next 3-5 years – how soon will line charges increase and by how much given regulatory scrutiny by the Commerce Commission?*

Is Aurora Energy Ltd solvent at this time? Explain.

Please provide any financial detail(s) salient to these matters.

Sincerely

Elizabeth Kerr
Dunedin

*emphasis added 24.2.17

—————————————-

From: Grady Cameron
Sent: Wednesday, 22 February 2017 1:02 p.m.
To: Elizabeth Kerr
Subject: Aurora Energy Ltd – Official Information Request (LGOIMA)

Dear Elizabeth

Thank you for your enquiry. We acknowledge receipt of your official information request received by us on 21 February regarding Aurora Energy (our reference 0945).

We will endeavour to respond to your request as soon as possible and in any event no later than 21 March, being 20 working days after the day your request was received. If we are unable to respond to your request by then, we will notify you of an extension of that timeframe.

Kind regards,
Glenda

****

Received.
Fri, 24 Feb 2017 at 1:58 a.m.

[click to enlarge]

ODT 24.2.17 (page 4)

odt-24-2-17-aurora-planned-power-outages-p4

ODT 24.2.17 (page 5)

odt-24-2-17-aurora-energy-notification-of-electricity-delivery-prices-p5

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Delta #EpicPowerFail 10 : Grady Cameron : The Counterfeit Comet

Received from Christchurch Driver [CD]
Thu, 16 Feb 2017 at 12:15 a.m.

Dear Readers

Local cyberspace has run hot tonight with the news that Grady Cameron has finally taken Richard Healey’s advice and fallen on one of his many splintered power poles, tendering his resignation. But just like a funhouse hall of mirrors, nothing at Aurora/Delta is as it seems. Mr Cameron is leaving later not sooner. It should be sooner, much sooner, like now.

As pointed out several times by Jarrod Stewart and Richard Healey, Grady is entirely the wrong individual to “oversee the transition process, along with the accelerated pole programme now under way”, which was the vague treacle proffered by Gary Gyroscope Johnson and Mr Thompson as an excuse for Mr Cameron to cling on for another year.

What the somewhat dim Mr Thompson does not know is that most of Delta already know what provision for early termination is in Grady’s package, and it is….12 months’ salary. (Hard to keep anything secret at Delta these days, Mr Thompson!) Go on, refute that “unfounded speculation”, Mr Gyroscope!

Therefore Mr Thompson had the two terminally unattractive options of 1) Paying Grady $600,000 to do nothing or 2) Paying Grady $600,000 to hang around and pretend that his help is “appreciated”. Chairman Thompson knew he would be sacked if he agreed to pay Grady $600,000 to do nothing, because What if? Dunedin and many others would find out in short order, and it would be curtains for Mr Thompson – sooner rather than later. However, Mr Thompson has made an elementary error. When you sack someone, get them gone. This is not Personnel Management 101, it’s 001. Despite $600,000 being a lot of cash, it was still the right thing to do because Grady’s other great failure as CEO was to preside over the accelerated decline of the staff at Delta.

odt-16-2-17-cameron-not-seeking-new-role-p3-underlined

It is past the tipping point and on its way to collapse, and if Grady stays another year collapse it will. At this stage in your correspondent’s post, the Greek chorus begins, accompanied by the rattling cups of Choysa : Evidence, evidence, give us the factual evidence!

Very well readers, have the Gaviscon ready, here are some stomach turning informational nuggets to show the appalling state of the Delta engineering department, the essential core of the organisation. Desk executive types like Grady and Matt Ballard can come and go, but the engineers make the place run.

While Mr Gyroscope and Mr Thompson trumpeted the two new external appointments today, they failed to mention that there are 45 vacancies – yes 45, that is 4 lots of 10 plus 5, Steve, at Delta.

Your correspondent understands these are in the main technical positions that any reputable company will have trouble filling, let alone a basket case like Delta.

Very recently, a capable senior design engineer was asked by either Matt Ballard or Grady “What would it take to get you to stay?”, as they had been alerted that the engineer was about to vote with his feet. “Nothing could convince me to stay” was the response and the engineer who was in the prime of his career and had worked for Delta for 6-7 years, departed to the North Island.

Next fact: There are now fewer than 10 design engineers left at Delta. There will be one less tomorrow because another resigned today but hadn’t advised The Management.

Alarming fact : Your correspondent is advised that of those left, at least three already have plans in place to leave that are not negotiable.

Strange but true : A design engineer recently resigned. Mule-like, Mr Cameron and his cohorts “refused to acknowledge his resignation”. This would appear to be code for “we will pay you absolutely anything you want because we know we will get no applicants for your position”, much like the example above. We can conclude from the example with Derek Todd quoted in #EpicPowerFail 9 that the practical limit is a tripling in salary.

There’s more : After deducting out those engineers, there are others actively looking to leave also. We can know this with confidence as a Wellington power company advertised a position for a design engineer recently. The recruiter called a contact at Delta and asked “What the heck is going on down there – we have had 4 applications and 3 of them are from Delta !!”

Grady’s response to this is to hire engineers from around the world, and try and fill engineering positions with “Project Managers” (Godfrey Brosnan is just the latest example). This is not to denigrate those with overseas qualifications or from a different culture but as Richard Healey notes, this is a dangerous high risk industry and ‘culture’ is important. Experienced local engineers with institutional knowledge and memory are priceless – and absolutely essential. The legacy of Grady and successive incompetent boards is that Delta and Aurora, are very likely to be left with somewhere between very few and almost none.

Your correspondent is given to understand that there is a funereal level of staff morale. Many staff around all departments have the view that (Delta)Aurora is only a few more key resignations away from being unable to function as a lines company. Richard Healey may be able to comment further on this.

The common theme from departed staff is that they would not work any longer under the management regime.

Normally your correspondent likes to finish with what he fondly imagines to be a witty riposte, but after surveying the decayed remnants of Aurora, humour is not appropriate. 

Since 2009, Grady Cameron has blazed across our power line landscape like a counterfeit comet. Grady’s disastrous tenure has created a giant financial crater for the city that will have to be made good by ratepayers for around twenty years – most of a generation.  

While not solely responsible, he encouraged a culture of cynical disinterest in the long-term health of the company he was charged with protecting, to flourish.

There is no wit to be had here, but justifiable anger. 

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: ODT 16.2.17 Cameron will not seek new role page 3 detail tweaks by whatifdunedin

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Basic questions arising for the City, unpublished by the newspaper

Received from John Evans
Tue, 17 Jan 2017 at 7:47 p.m.

From: John Evans
Date: Monday, January 16, 2017
Subject: KPI
To: ODT editor

The Editor, ODT

Sir,

We are often regaled by company directors, CEOs and bureaucrats with discourses on the importance of KPIs. KPIs?

Key Performance Indicators – one of many PR corporate speak Buzzwords.

Wikipedia’s definition is pretty broad but basically it means that certain measures designed by the company or board are measured against actual performances.

Recently, the term gained another meaning when KEY performance [was] reassessed in the light of John KEY’s resignation. Unfortunately his stellar career as Prime Minister seemed to be judged poorly by those political pundits doing the assessment.

The key word is Performance, the measure of which is judged in order to provide an increase in salary or measures which might lose the judged their position if they failed to meet the KPIs included as part of the employment contract.

The test is what performance is paramount and who is it paramount to.
These tests are important in worldwide businesses but is there a different reality in New Zealand? It seems to me that either the KPIs are set incorrectly or there is a disconnect because no one seems to fail, to not meet their predetermined KPIs.

[infront.com]

One example is the role of council lawyers. Why would council lawyers write in an employment contract a clause which gave the employee a golden parachute even if they failed to meet their KPIs? Or was it the employees themselves who wrote the KPIs for their own future benefit? Surely if this was so, the lawyers acting for the company or body they represent would refuse to condone the parachute for employees and directors after proven incompetence.

The Dunedin City Council and its management, and the council owned companies, are surely charged with KPIs and, one surmises, about the results of such indicators and the resultant effects on the council and its employees. Can we analyse a few actions of the council and what the KPIs may have been and whether they would meet them and perhaps the consequences of meeting them or not.

The first and most obvious one is the theft of 152+ cars.
What was the measure of acceptable theft? Was it 20 cars, 100 cars or was 150 cars sufficient to tip them over the edge. And as another example, what was the Police’s key indicator on this matter? Do they prosecute for the theft or conversion of 1 car or does it take 160 cars to prosecute somebody for being involved either in the theft or knowing receipt of a car or cars?

The next is the investment in land and development projects by Delta.
Was failure in one, two or three such projects acceptable or is the magic number 5 (Delta will do it again and we have not quite got there yet).

The Dunedin stadium KPIs. Is a running cost of some $20million acceptable as an annual loss to the ratepayers or should the losses be only $15million or shock horror only $5million. Or should the ratepayers be released from the financial burden which was never the choice of the majority?

Sewage Treatment KPI – Is it acceptable to process sewage to a point that it pollutes the ocean two kilometres out or are we entitled to potable water ex site at Tahuna?

Mudtank cleaning KPI – How many mudtanks cleaned would be an acceptable result, would a flood in South Dunedin suggest that measure was incorrect? Contractual performance and payment for same. Would a KPI for the DCC CEO include overall managing payments to contractors? If a contractor did not perform to those KPIs set within the mudtank cleaning contract, should the contractor be still paid?

Wastewater treatment – Is it an acceptable KPI for wastewater treatment that in high rainfall such overflows are discharged into the pristine Otago Harbour?

Delta KPI on pole replacement. Is 100 unreplaced tagged poles acceptable? Is 1000 acceptable? On suspect poles, is a KPI that the company changes so that they did not breach a previous KPI acceptable or should every company and council just change their KPIs to avoid failure, blame or the legal consequences?

Richard Healey, the “whistleblower” on Delta’s failures seems to have personal ‘built-in’ KPIs —including integrity, high quality job performance, peer safety and corporate responsibility. Just why do the CEO and directors’ KPIs apparently differ from these such that Healey has to resign for them to take note?

On Directors of the council owned companies, do their KPIs reflect their responsibility under the law or are they designed to protect the directors from prosecution under the law despite failure by other measures?

And where does the buck stop?

Just what are the KPIs upon which we judge the mayor, based? Is the only measurement his electability?

Are we the ratepayers not entitled to expect a KPI that includes retribution against failings in any DCC departments or DCHL companies? If we do not reward success and prosecute failure in some way are we not missing the whole point of Pavlov and his dogs? Should we not then close our prisons and let the perpetrators of violence, antisocial acts and any injustice roam free, surely this is the logical nett result of such an attitude of no judgement.

The analysis of John Key’s contribution would suggest that electability and performance may well be poles apart. Perhaps that is the greatest lesson we can learn from the errors of judgement of recent times in our city.

John P. Evans
Otakou

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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DCC loses City Property manager in restructuring

### dunedintv.co.nz April 28, 2014 – 6:53pm
DCC’s Robert Clark steps down
The man in charge of the Dunedin City Council’s property portfolio is leaving the role he has held for the last six years. Group manager of economic development and property Robert Clark is returning to the commercial sector. The council says the creation of a city marketing agency and proposed structural changes will affect property operations. It says that review provided an opportunity for Clark to return to the commercial property environment, and pursue other interests.
Ch39 Link [no video available]

****

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Manager Economic Development and Property moving on

This item was published on 28 Apr 2014

The Dunedin City Council’s Group Manager Economic Development and Property Robert Clark is leaving the organisation after six years to return to the commercial sector. General Manager Infrastructure and Networks Tony Avery says Mr Clark’s last day at the DCC will be on Friday, although he will continue to do transitional consulting work in the coming months on some significant projects.

Mr Avery says the DCC is currently working on the creation of a City marketing agency and proposed structural changes, some of which may impact on its property operations. “The DCC and Robert have been in discussion around the future of the Property Group within Council. Robert has achieved a number of significant successful property and commercial projects and outcomes for the city. The review of property operations has provided an opportunity for Robert to return to the commercial property environment and pursue other interests. Robert wishes his team and colleagues well and said it has been a privilege and pleasure to work with such a talented group and achieve such positive outcomes for the city. He leaves the DCC with our best wishes and we look forward to an ongoing working relationship with Robert.”

Mr Avery says the DCC is still in consultation with staff regarding the proposed marketing group and other organisational changes, and an announcement is expected from CEO Sue Bidrose by the end of the week.

Contact General Manager Infrastructure and Networks on 477 4000.

DCC Link

****

The existing positions of economic development and property group manager, held at present by Robert Clark, and customer services agency manager, held by Adrian Blair, would be disestablished under the proposed changes.

### ODT Online Wed, 26 Mar 2014
Further DCC restructuring proposed
By Debbie Porteous
The Otago Daily Times understands the council is proposing two management positions be disestablished and three new positions created under a new council structure. Two new groups with new group managers would be created and the council’s commercial property investment portfolio split off from operational property and moved into the finance team. A commercial property investment manager position would be created with responsibility for overseeing such investments across the whole council family, including by council-owned and controlled companies.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: Back in empire building mode (ZERO HARM staff positions)

H&S card [rlv.zcache.com] 1Comment and link received from Hype O’Thermia
Monday, 21 April 2014 6:59 p.m.

“…will be a key part of the newly established Organisational Development and Performance team.”

Newly, again? A necessity of course, not a nice-to-have nor even a make-work scheme giving the impression that something they do* will improve other people’s safety.

*Do, meaning make rules and produce forms to be filled in for Compliance, without which the fair and reasonable fee cannot be charged and nothing can happen.

http://jobs.odt.co.nz/displayjob.php?JobID=352982&occupation%5B%5D=8

Health and Safety positions
Dunedin City Council Opportunities

Help us embark on the next phase of our Health and Safety journey. Dunedin City Council has recently adopted a new Health and Safety Strategic Plan and is embarking on a new and exciting chapter in achieving a Zero Harm goal.

You will be able to influence and support change in a complex working environment, recognising that health and safety is everyone’s business. We are looking to drive continuous improvement within the working environment, supporting our managers, improving the lives of our employees and volunteers, and maximising our performance for our customers and ratepayers.

The roles are new, challenging and varied, and provide an excellent career opportunity to work in a progressive service led organisation.

Health and Safety Compliance Officer
You will be a health and safety professional experienced in driving health and safety in a complex environment. You will be able to demonstrate a ‘can-do ’ attitude, have excellent communication skills and an eye for detail. Specific experience of health and safety or contractor management systems is desirable, but more important is your working knowledge of management information systems in general. Experience in a health and safety or human resources role is essential.

Health and Safety Analyst
With a strong focus on safety analysis and effective administrative skills, you will provide advice and support to managers within a large multifunctional environment. This is a unique opportunity for an aspiring health and safety or human resources graduate looking to further develop their career and fully utilise their existing skills and knowledge.

An understanding of, or experience working with management systems is desirable. It is expected that you will have well developed analytical skills and a relevant health and safety or Human Resources qualification.

Both roles report to the Health and Safety Manager and will be a key part of the newly established Organisational Development and Performance team.

For informal enquiries about either of these roles, please contact Brian Ballantyne, Health and Safety Manager on 03 477-4000.

For an application pack please refer to our website www.dunedin.govt.nz/jobs or contact our Customer Service Agency in the Civic Centre, telephone 03 477 4000, PO Box 5045, Dunedin. Email address: jobs @ dcc.govt.nz healthandsafetycapetown 1

Applications close 4p.m.,
Friday, 2 May.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Unlike red carpet…

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DCC: New chief executive

Sue Bidrose [amps.co.nz] 1The choice of an in-house candidate with some spendthrift tendencies —none other than Sue Bidrose, aka Rosebud.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
New DCC Chief Executive Announced

This item was published on 18 Nov 2013.

Dunedin City Council senior manager Sue Bidrose is the DCC’s new Chief Executive. Bidrose, currently DCC General Manager Services and Development, will take up the position on Saturday, 23 November. Announcing the appointment today, Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says the Council made a clear decision in favour of Bidrose, from a strong field of 31 applicants, including overseas applicants.

“[Ms] Bidrose has been performing at a very high level for the three years she has been with the DCC. She continues the tradition of a Chief Executive with a highly developed sense of the responsibilities of public service. I am very confident she is not only extremely competent, but is of the utmost integrity.”

As a member of the DCC’s senior executive team Bidrose helped drive far-reaching changes in the past three years to limit debt and reduce staff and spending, while not reducing levels of service to the community. “It was important for us that the changes put in place by the current Chief Executive were seamlessly progressed and Sue is in the ideal position to do that,” Cull says. Bidrose, who is the DCC’s first female chief executive, says she is delighted to have been selected for the role.

“I am very much looking forward to the challenges of the Chief Executive’s position. I am committed to this organisation and to continuing to have a successful working relationship with elected representatives, staff and the community.”

Bidrose replaces Paul Orders who leaves on Saturday to take up the post of Chief Executive of Cardiff Council in Wales. Bidrose started with the DCC in November 2010 as General Manager Strategy and Development. She came from the Waitakere City Council where she had spent five years in a range of leadership positions, including Director: Community Wellbeing. Bidrose’s previous experience includes senior policy and managerial roles with the Ministry of Social Development. Trusteeships, directorships and board positions held by Bidrose include her current role as Director of Workwise, an agency which assists people with mental illness into work. Bidrose has a PhD in psychology from the University of Otago.

Bidrose’s base annual salary is $325,000. If Kiwisaver contributions are made, total remuneration would be $334,750.

Contact Mayor of Dunedin on 03 477 4000.

DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
14.11.13 Jeff Dickie thanks Mr Orders for trying (unabridged)
9.11.13 DCC: Appointing a new chief executive
8.11.13 DCHL, long wait for review (Larsen sighs)
29.10.13 DCC: First meeting, tidy or not
25.10.13 Dunedin: “no-growth city”
24.10.13 DCC in-house catering, pruned like CCC?
14.10.13 DCC: New chief financial officer
7.10.13 DCC councillors, no idea annual cost of owning, operating FB Stadium
29.9.13 Cull’s political party… Lost best chief executive we could find.
24.9.13 DCC chief executive Paul Orders recommended for Cardiff
7.9.13 Stadium: $266 million, more or less?
2.8.13 DCC, Stadium —sorry picture
10.7.13 Stadium: Edgar will honour $1M personal pledge to project
9.7.13 Delta Utility Services Ltd, full investigation needed
25.5.13 Paul Orders: Dunedin or Cardiff ???
7.9.12 Ombudsman assists release of CST file information
24.2.12 ‘The final cost of the stadium is … unknown.’

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Auckland Motorcycles & Power Sports – Sue Bidrose (Ms)

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