Tag Archives: Forestry

Dunedin’s Logan Park / Signal Hill Fire Dec 2016 ● Cause unknown

Dunedin man Wayne Baird said flames were “a good 30 or 40 metres high…. It’s a good wind blowing right up the valley. It’s all bush and pine so it’s good fuel.” (Stuff)

28.12.16 Stuff.co.nz at 7:47am
Fire crews at the scene of large fire in Dunedin
By Hamish McNeilly
Fire crews are at the scene of a large fire on Wednesday morning to ensure it remains extinguished. The fire threatened a Dunedin high school and several homes. Patrols stayed on Signal Hill through the night, dampening down hot spots after a bush-clad area half the size of a rugby field on the side of Signal Hill was sparked on Tuesday afternoon. […] The fire was contained by 5.45pm on Tuesday and rural fire crews patrolled the area overnight, a Fire Service spokesman said. “I don’t believe it will spread any more and the chances of evacuation have gone down a lot,” he said.
Read more + Photos/Videos

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27.12.16 RNZ News at 8:51 p.m.
Three homes evacuated over Dunedin scrub fire
Three homes have been evacuated as a precaution, as firefighters continue to extinguish a large scrub fire in Dunedin. The scrub fire on Signal Hill near Butts Road broke out at about 2.45pm and was fanned by strong winds. Link + Photos

27.12.16 NZ Herald at 7:19 p.m.
Large fire burning on Signal Hill in Dunedin contained
The fire on Signal Hill in Dunedin has been contained, but about 40 firefighters and three helicopters are continuing to fight the blaze. Earlier tonight three homes in Rimu Street, Ravensbourne, were evacuated as a precaution. The occupants of these homes are likely to return tonight. […] Local residents said the fire 10 years ago was worse. Link + Video

27.12.16 TVNZ 1 News at 5:47 p.m.
Fire on Dunedin’s Signal Hill now contained, cause still unknown
A large scrub fire in Dunedin is now contained, after it began earlier this afternoon. Forty firefighters and four helicopters are at the scene on Signal Hill behind Logan Park High School in North Dunedin. A Fire Service spokesperson says they were called to the fire just before 3pm. They say the blaze is now contained but not extinguished, and they expect to work all night dampening it down. Link + Video

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Otago Daily Times

28.12.16 Hillside ablaze in Dunedin [photos]
28.12.16 Fire crews on watch overnight [story, video and photos]
27.12.16 Ravensbourne evacuees likely to return home [story, videos and photos]

Otago Daily Times Published on Dec 27, 2016
Emergency services attend a large fire at Signal Hill
Emergency services, including three helicopters with monsoon buckets, attend a large fire at Signal Hill.

Otago Daily Times Published on Dec 27, 2016
Fire at Signal Hill
Video: Vaugan Elder

Otago Daily Times Published on Dec 27, 2016
Fire on Signal Hill from Logan Park
Fire on Signal Hill from Logan Park High School.

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TEN YEARS AGO

In late October 2006, bush fires caused extensive damage to forest plantations on the western slopes of Signal Hill. The series of fires forced DCC to close the Signal Hill Reserve indefinitely.

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HISTORICAL

ODT: Opinion: 100 Years Ago (re-published on 9 Oct 2014)
A great fire
Under the influence of the heavy north-west gale which blew yesterday the smouldering fires which are stated to have started on the Leith-Waitati saddle about last Tuesday and travelled to Mount Cargill burst into vivid flames, which spread with great rapidity. The warm winds which have been experienced since Tuesday – at first from the south-west and yesterday from the north-east – have had a drying effect on the grass, and, the fire once fully alight, soon spread in all directions. Yesterday fires were observed on Mount Cargill, on Signal Hill, and on the hill above Logan’s quarry, and vast clouds of smoke drifted from these across the harbour, in places quite blotting out the view. Fortunately the fire above the quarry did not live long, while that at Signal Hill also appeared late in the afternoon to have burnt itself out. On the Leith-Waitati saddle and Mount Cargill, however, a different tale has to be told. Read more

ODT: Opinion: 100 Years Ago (re-published on 11 Oct 2014)
Flames thwarted
Fortunately the flames of the Leith-Mt Cargill-Waitati Saddle fire did not demolish any dwellings, and the actual damage suffered by settlers, apart from the loss of timber, was, as far as could be ascertained, very slight, considering the magnitude of the fire. The loss of timber was the greatest suffered by anyone, and a good deal of valuable wood was destroyed. A few sheds and small huts were also wiped out of existence, and a length of tramway belonging to a sawmiller and an odd haystack was burned. The timber destroyed was the real loss, and it is difficult to estimate its value. However, it must be considerable. […] In a few places telegraph poles were burnt, but no damage was done sufficiently serious to interfere greatly with communication. The most irreparable damage is that to the scenic reserves, which have suffered very badly. A patch of bush at Upper Waitati between the Saddle and Pine Hill, owned by the Dunedin City Council and the Scenic Preservation Commissioners, was attacked, and many acres of it have been ruined.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Warning! NZ disposable income down

Link received Mon, 6 Apr 2015 at 1:00 p.m.

█ Message: Wouldn’t read this in local media !!!

### marketoracle.co.uk Apr 05, 2015 – 01:28 PM GMT
Economics / Asian Economies
New Zealand Economy – There’s Trouble Brewing In Middle Earth
By Raul I Meijer
For the second time in three years, I’m fortunate enough to spend some time in New Zealand (or Aotearoa). In 2012, it was all mostly a pretty crazy touring schedule, but this time is a bit quieter. Still get to meet tons of people though, in between the relentless Automatic Earth publishing schedule. And of course people want to ask, once they know what I do, how I think their country is doing.
My answer is I think New Zealand is much better off than most other countries, but not because they’re presently richer (disappointing for many). They’re better off because of the potential here. Which isn’t being used much at all right now. In fact, New Zealand does about everything wrong on a political and macro-economic scale. […] I’ve been going through some numbers today, and lots of articles, and I think I have an idea what’s going on. Thank you to my new best friend Grant here in Northland (is it Kerikeri or Kaikohe?) for providing much of the reading material and the initial spark.
To begin with, official government data. We love those, don’t we, wherever we turn our inquisitive heads. Because no government would ever not be fully open and truthful.

This is from Stuff.co.nz, March 19 2015:
New Zealand GDP grew 3.3% last year

New Zealand’s economy grew 3.3% last year, the fastest since 2007 before the global financial crisis, Statistics NZ said. Most forecasts expect the economy to keep growing this year and next, although slightly more slowly than in the past year. For the three months ended December 31, GDP grew 0.8%, in line with Reserve Bank and other forecasts. That was led by shop sales and accommodation. That sounds great compared to most other nations. But then we find out where the alleged growth has come from (I say alleged because other data cast a serious doubt on the ‘official’ numbers) […] while the economy ostensibly grew by 3.3%, disposable income was down. That’s what you call a warning sign.

….Meijer’s commentary continues in reference to recent New Zealand news stories:

Stuff: Dairy Slump Hits New Zealand Exports To China
Radio NZ: Export Drop Rattles Companies
NZ Herald: World Dairy Prices Slide 10.8% On Supply Concerns
Radio NZ: World ‘Awash With Milk’
NZ Herald: Stress Too Much For Farmers
NZ Herald: Hot Properties: Auckland Valuations Out Of Date Within Months

He ends by citing NZ Herald: New Zealand’s Economic Winds Of Change:

Chaos theory calls it the butterfly effect. It’s the idea that a butterfly flapping its wings in the Amazon could cause a tornado in Texas. The New Zealand economy has plenty of its own butterflies changing the weather for GDP growth, jobs, interest rates, inflation and house prices. [..] One of the flappiest at the moment is the global iron ore price. It’s barely noticed here but it’s an indicator of growing trouble inside our largest trading partner, China, and it is knocking our second-largest partner, Australia, for six. It fell to a 10-year low of almost US$50 a tonne this week and is down from a peak of more than US$170 a tonne in early 2011.
[…] President Xi has reinforced the contrasting effects of the changes in China on Australia and New Zealand by encouraging consumers and investors to spend more of China’s big trade surpluses overseas. Tourism from China was up 40% in the first two months of this year from a year ago, and there remains plenty of demand from investors in China for New Zealand assets.
The dark side of this tornado in New Zealand after the flapping of the butterfly’s wings in China was felt in Nelson this week. The region’s biggest logging trucking firm, Waimea Contract Carriers, was put into voluntary administration owing $14m, partly because of a slump in log exports to China in the past six months.
That’s because New Zealand’s logs are now mostly shipped to China to be timber boxing for the concrete being poured in its new “ghost” cities. The Chinese iron ore butterfly has flapped and now we’re seeing Gold Coast winter breaks become cheaper and logging contracts rarer.

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Website: http://theautomaticearth.com (provides unique analysis of economics, finance, politics and social dynamics in the context of Complexity Theory)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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