Tag Archives: Historic heritage

Cargill’s Castle Trust : Let’s re-establish clifftop walking track to Tunnel Beach

Sun, 3 Apr 2016
ODT: Cliff top path plan tabled for talks
Cargill’s Castle Trust plans to re-establish a clifftop walking track between Cargill’s Castle and Tunnel Beach. Plans will be tabled for discussion at a meeting this week. Cargill’s Castle, built in 1877 on the St Clair clifftops, was originally occupied by prominent Dunedin business man and politician Edward Bowes Cargill and his family. They had a pathway laid from the castle to Tunnel Beach, which the trust is keen to restore. In December, the trust was awarded a $5000 grant by the New Zealand Walking Access Commission to assist with legal fees and survey costs for the proposed 2km clifftop route.

█ PUBLIC MEETING
Cargill’s Castle Trust chairman Steven de Graaf says local residents and the wider public are invited to hear about the plans and air any concerns at this week’s meeting: Wednesday 6 April, St Clair Golf Club at 7pm

█ CALL FOR MEMBERS
Cargill’s Castle Trust was established in 1997 to stabilise the ruin, develop the surrounds as a clifftop park, and provide walking access for the public. To keep its plans moving forward, the trust needs fresh energy, particularly for fundraising, and is looking for members to come on board.
Find out more, go to http://www.cargillscastle.co.nz/

Old news via DCC Draft LTP 2015/16-2024/25:

Wed, 20 May 2015
ODT: Track costs study
Dunedin City Council will investigate the implications of taking over maintenance of a coastal walkway linking Cargill’s Castle and nearby Tunnel Beach. Councillors voted for the investigation at yesterday’s long-term plan deliberations after Cargill’s Castle Trust chairman Steven De Graaf brought up the track at last week’s submission hearings.

[click to enlarge]
DCC Webmap - Tunnel Beach - Cargills Castle - St Clair, Dunedin JanFeb2013 (1)DCC Webmap - Cargills Castle, 111D Cliffs Road, Dunedin JanFeb2013DCC Webmaps JanFeb 2013 1. Tunnel Beach/ Cargill’s Castle (red star)/ St Clair 2. Cargill’s Castle, 111D Cliffs Road, Dunedin

Cargill’s Castle is one of the most significant historic structures in Dunedin and one of only two castles in New Zealand.

The mission of the Cargill’s Castle Trust is to retain the castle as part of the cultural, historic and recreational fabric of Dunedin, for the benefit of Dunedin and visitors, through:
• Conserving the castle structure as a significant Dunedin landmark. The Trust does not intend to rebuild the castle, simply to stabilise and retain the ruin.
• Development of Cargill’s Castle as a clifftop park and providing walking access for the public.
• To provide interpretation of the history and cultural significance of the castle, including the Cargill family and the castles noted architect, F W Petre.
• Inclusion of Cargill’s Castle in the proposed Blackhead to St Clair Track.

The castle has a fascinating history, find out more here.

█ Heritage New Zealand – List No. 3174 [History and Assessment]

Cargills_Castle_Original_Photo [cargillscastle.co.nz] 1vCargills_Castle_Original_Black_and_White [cargillscastle.co.nz] bw1Cargills_Castle_Recent_Photo___Front [cargillscastle.co.nz] bwImages: Cargill’s Castle Trust web gallery

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Symphony Orchestra to former Hanover Street Baptist Church

NEW NAME ● EXCITING PROGRAMME ● HERITAGE BUILDING

DSO logoDSO 1

Dunedin now needs to get enthusiastic about the concert series, talking about it, anticipating the performances and backing to the hilt the sinfonia as it prepares for a momentous year.

### ODT Online Mon, 1 Feb 2016
Editorial: Supporting the music
OPINION Dunedin has a vibrant arts culture and one of the most significant parts of the culture is the Southern Sinfonia. […] To celebrate its 50th year, the sinfonia has chosen to make some major changes to mark the occasion and one of them is the change of name to the Dunedin Symphony Orchestra. One of the most exciting pieces of news to come out of the recently-announced changes is the sinfonia has outgrown its premises, growing from a small group to a larger orchestra playing symphonic music. To accommodate the growth, it is leaving behind the rehearsal rooms and office at the Carnegie Centre and moving in May to Hanover Hall, in Hanover St.
Read more

█ Website: dso.org.nz
Facebook: DunedinSymphonyOrchestra
Twitter: DunedinSymphony
YouTube: Dunedin Symphony Orchestra

Hanover Street Baptist Church Building-two-col2 [dcbc.co.nz] 1Past and present Baptist church buildings, Hanover St cnr Great King St [dcbc.co.nz] tweaked by whatifdunedin

Heritage New Zealand Category 1 historic place – List No. 4792
Hanover Street Baptist Church (built 1912), 65 Hanover Street, Dunedin

Summary: The first meeting of the Baptist Church in Dunedin was held in 1863. Baptist meetings were held in the courthouse until 1864 when the site on the corner of Hanover and Great King Streets was purchased and a church was built to the design of Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902).
A fund to build a new church was initiated in 1900 and the proposal was brought forward in 1909 by which time the old building was considered “old and antiquated and unsightly”. It was demolished in 1910 and the foundation stone of the new building was laid on 8 October 1910 on the same site. It was completed in 1912 at a cost of £7,000.

Architect: Edmund Anscombe (1874-1948) was born in Sussex and came to New Zealand as a child. He began work as a builder’s apprentice in Dunedin and in 1901 went to America to study architecture. He returned to Dunedin in 1907 and designed the School of Mines building for the University of Otago. The success of this design gained him the position of architect to the University. Five of the main University buildings were designed by Anscombe, as well as Otago Girls’ High School and several of Dunedin’s finest commercial buildings including the Lindo Ferguson Building (1927) and the Haynes building.

█ Wikipedia: Hanover Street Baptist Church

DCBC HISTORY
On September 6, 1863 Hanover Street Baptist Church was founded – constituted as a church with 22 members. As one of the earliest NZ Baptist churches – Dunedin was first settled by Europeans in 1849 – it was a church with a mission: in a strongly Presbyterian city it sought to be a church which lowered the barriers to enable people to become part of it. Unlike most Baptist churches of the time it had open membership which required only a full commitment to Jesus Christ – reaching outwards was its heartbeat. In the years that followed it started many other Baptist churches in the city, helped set up the Baptist Union of churches in New Zealand and launched the Baptist missionary society, sending out some of the first Baptist missionaries from New Zealand. Into the next century Hanover St Baptist was a strong growing church, but numbers declined in the early 1900s. However, following the Depression the church regained its strength. Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Christ Church Cathedral: practical news from govt mediator Miriam Dean QC

Updated post
Sat, 26 Dec 2015 at 3:25 a.m.

### beehive.govt.nz 23 December, 2015
Gerry Brownlee Media Release
Report confirms ChristChurch Cathedral can be reinstated

Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Gerry Brownlee says the decision by the Anglican Church to progress investigations into reinstating the ChristChurch Cathedral will be greatly appreciated by the wider community.
The Church Property Trust, which owns the Anglican Cathedral in Cathedral Square, has received an independent report from a Government-appointed consultant, who has reviewed the engineering options for the iconic city building.
“All of the parties’ engineers agree that the reinstatement of the Cathedral would require a combination of repair, restoration and reconstruction,” Mr Brownlee says. “The issue then comes back to cost and that is something the Church Property Trust will need absolute certainty of before it can commit to any work going ahead.”
Mr Brownlee says CPT is keen to enter further discussions with the Government in regard to progressing towards a reinstatement plan for the ChristChurch Cathedral, and that will happen in the New Year.
“And that is why we need to gain certainty about the affordability of this project and be able to work through the options. The positive outcome here is that there are now options to work through and that CPT is willing to do so.”
Link

███ Report on facilitated discussions with engineers on engineering options for repair, restoration or replacement of ChristChurch Cathedral. (PDF, 11.22 MB)

220211 News:Don Scott/The Press Christchurch earthquake. The Cathedral with its spire missing.Christchurch Cathedral 1 [Stuff.co.nz]Photos: Don Scott – The Press

Most of the building is intact – the scaremongering re the safety and cost of a rebuild is just that.

The Anglican Church has agreed to consider “reinstating” the Christ Church Cathedral at a press conference today.

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 18:14, December 23 2015
The Press
Anglican Church to consider reinstating Christ Church Cathedral video
By Michael Wright
[…] A report by Government-appointed mediator Miriam Dean QC found the cathedral could be either reconstructed to be “indistinguishable” from its pre-quake self or replaced.
[…] Restoration campaigner Philip Burdon, co-chair of the Great Christchurch Buildings Trust, said he was “delighted and relieved” to learn the cathedral could be repaired, and was certain the necessary funds could be raised. “It had been the argument of the church that the building was unrepairable. The question of whether restoration was possible or not has been answered – I think that will be a considerable relief to the community.”
Read more

Yes, the Bishop is dragging her heels but MONEY might change her mind. Watch the Press video for her public statement and body language.

Earlier documents commissioned by Great Christchurch Building Trust (GCBT), documents received 10 July 2012 via Mark Belton at Restore Christchurch Cathedral:

Christchurch Cathedral Structural engineering Review Final 27June2012
(PDF, 94.8 KB)

Christchurch Cathedral MRO prelim sketches (F)
(PDF, 3.9 MB)

Related Posts and Comments:
14.7.12 Rival newspaper on historic heritage #cathedral
2.3.12 Christ Church, Cathedral Square

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Courthouse —Cabinet backs #restoration for courts use

IMG_0138 (1)A considerable weight lifted….

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 17:44, December 7 2015
Dunedin’s historic courthouse to be saved
Dunedin’s historic courthouse will be strengthened and restored at a cost of $15 million […] Strengthening work was expected to take two years, and the city’s temporary court in High St would continue to be used in the interim. It was hoped a main contractor would be appointed later in 2016, following a tendering process, [Ms] Adams said.
Read more

****

“The Dunedin courthouse is one of New Zealand’s most notable historic buildings and Cabinet’s decision reflects its significance, both as a part of the city’s rich cultural heritage and its importance to the region’s legal fraternity.” –Minister Amy Adams

Amy Adams [radionz.co.nz] 211### ODT Online Mon, 7 Dec 2015
Full restoration for Dunedin courthouse
By Craig Borley
Dunedin’s historic courthouse will be saved, strengthened, restored and have all its court service returned to it. The decision was made in today’s final Cabinet meeting of the year. Justice and Courts Minister Amy Adams announced the outcome just after 4pm. […] The decision means a “more than $15 million” overhaul of the Stuart St complex, bringing it up to between 60% and 70% of new building standard, as well as “provision the buildings to operate as modern court facilities”.
Read more

Full Statement —Minister

Amy Adams

7 December, 2015

Dunedin’s historic courthouse to be restored

Courts Minister Amy Adams today announced that Cabinet has agreed to the strengthening and restoration of Dunedin’s historic courthouse.

“The Dunedin courthouse is one of New Zealand’s most notable historic buildings and Cabinet’s decision reflects its significance, both as a part of the city’s rich cultural heritage and its importance to the region’s legal fraternity,” Ms Adams says.

“From the beginning, I’ve maintained that it’s been my intention, expectation and desire to see court services returned to Dunedin’s historic courthouse and this decision delivers on that commitment.”

The project includes earthquake strengthening and restoration, as well as the cost of provision the buildings to operate as modern court facilities. The project is estimated to cost more than $15 million and this will include seeing the building strengthened to between 60 and 70 per cent of the National Building Standard.

“The strengthening project is anticipated to take two years to complete and the Ministry of Justice will continue to deliver quality services from the temporary court in High St in the interim,” Ms Adams says.

Ministry of Justice will call for tenders in the first half of next year and it was hoped a main contractor would be appointed later in 2016.

Ms Adams says the costings in the business case had been comprehensively investigated and peer reviewed by a number of independent specialist engineers, and costed by quantity surveyors, before being subjected to a robust review by The Treasury.

“The investigations showed that as a category one heritage building, strengthening the court house is a complex project and requires a significant capital investment.

“I acknowledge the deep support locals have shown for the historic courthouse throughout this process.”

The facility in Stuart St was closed in 2011 after engineers found that parts of the building fell well short of the minimum 34 percent rating required under the National Building Standard. A temporary facility has been established at High St to ensure court services could continue to be delivered to the people of Dunedin and Otago in the interim.

With Cabinet’s decision, managing the restoration process now becomes an operational matter for the Ministry of Justice.

http://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/dunedin%E2%80%99s-historic-courthouse-be-restored

Related Posts and Comments:
22.9.125 Dunedin Law Courts | ODT editorial
7.9.15 Public petition to save Courthouse for courts use
11.7.15 Dunedin Law Courts “an incredible historic building” –Minister
14.5.15 Russell Lund on Ministry closure of Dunedin Law Courts
14.5.15 Justice at Dunedin
2.5.15 Ministry serves INJUSTICE for Dunedin Courthouse #HistoricHeritage

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (top) Justice, Dunedin Law Courts (detail) by Elizabeth Kerr; radionz.co.nz – Amy Adams, tweaked by whatifdunedin

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SAVE Sammy’s (former His Majesty’s Theatre & Agricultural Hall)

Agricultural Hall. Burton Brothers studio. Te Papa Archives [C.012324]

His Majesty's Theatre, Dunedin [render via realestate.co.nz]His Majesty’s Theatre, Dunedin [render via realestate.co.nz]

Sammy's on Crawford [dunedinmusic.com]Sammy’s portico to Crawford Street [dunedinmusic.com]

REAL ESTATE BLURB | Built 1896 Agricultural Hall 1902 Renamed His Majesty’s Theatre 1983 Sammy’s Cabaret & Restaurant
Time for someone else to take over the reins – with fresh enthusiasm and ideas for this iconic Dunedin property. Located in the heart of Dunedin’s rapidly developing ‘Warehouse Precinct’ it lends itself to a multitude of uses. Building 1500m with frontages to both Crawford & Vogel Streets. http://www.remax.co.nz/10395003

█ SOUL DESTROYING LACK OF DISTRICT PLAN SCHEDULING
‘An offer pending consent for Sammy’s would more likely mean plans to considerably alter or demolish the building.’ –Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage)

█ SHINING LIGHTS
“It’s already protected under our Act, that’s the main thing.” –Matthew Schmidt, HNZ Otago Southland regional archaeologist

### ODT Online Wed, 18 Nov 2015
Uncertain future for venue
By Craig Borley
Demolition could be an option for Sammy’s, one of Dunedin’s most loved live music venues and one of the warehouse precinct’s largest buildings. On the market for “a few months” and with a list price of $240,000, the 1896 building had attracted attention from several potential buyers, owner Sam Chin said yesterday. Interest from one of those potential buyers was contingent on gaining a resource consent, Mr Chin said. He could not name the potential buyer and did not know what that resource consent was for.
Read more

BIG QUEST TO FIND THE RIGHT NEW OWNER – MEANWHILE, CITIZEN DUTY TO PROTECT THE BUILDING AS AN ICONIC PRESENCE IN VOGEL STREET HERITAGE PRECINCT AND WAREHOUSE PRECINCT

Sammy's Dunedin, NZ 7.9.12 [Sola Rosa via staticflickr.com]Sammy’s Dunedin NZ 7.9.12 [Sola Rosa via staticflickr.com]

Sammy's [alizarinlizard.blogspot.co.nz]Sammy’s (2011) [alizarinlizard.blogspot.co.nz]

“….we got back to Dunedin by lunchtime and unloaded the P.A gear into Sammys then went home an slept the rest of the day till we had to come back an sound check..
but yeah, played later on that night and had a blast. Sammys looks absolutely amazing now days if you havent seen it already.”
–Alizarin Lizard, Dunedin psych-pop quartet

But what looked good at night under lights in 2011 was profoundly “trouble” due to lack of diligent building repair and maintenance, or any appreciation for fire safety…. and more words from Mr Chin….

[via comments at What if? Dunedin]

Elizabeth
June 1, 2011 at 2:58 am
### D Scene 1-6-11
Future of Sammy’s uncertain after eviction (page 3)
The future of notable Dunedin music venue Sammy’s is uncertain, after the eviction earlier this week of the operators of the Crawford St business. Building owner Sam Chin told D Scene yesterday that he had moved into the venue on Monday night and changed the locks. “The venue is closed for now and we’re just cleaning things up.”
{continues} #bookmark [search required]

Elizabeth
June 2, 2011 at 8:40 pm
Tweet:
(2 June, 8:32pm) @DunedinTV Sammy’s closed down due to being in a complete state of disrepair http://tinyurl.com/43dprnf #channel9 #dunedin #tv #nz

Elizabeth
June 23, 2011 at 2:33 pm
### ODT Online Thu, 23 Jun 2011
Nightclub owner angry over damage at venue
By Nigel Benson
Sammy’s owner Sam Chin has experienced some wild nights at the nightclub over the years. But he was not prepared for the sight which greeted him when he changed the locks on the building three weeks ago, after not receiving rent from the lessee since November. […] The venue opened in 1896 as the Agricultural Hall, before being renamed His Majesty’s Theatre, and has a long history as a hall, theatre and live music venue. Mr Chin said he wanted to maintain that tradition and reopen it for concerts next month.
Read more

Elizabeth
August 7, 2011 at 11:36 am
### ODT Online Sun, 7 Aug 2011
Sammy’s set to reopen this month
By Nigel Benson
Sammy’s will reopen this month after being closed in June for refurbishment. Owner Sam Chin shut the venue after the building fell into disrepair. He said yesterday demand had led to him taking bookings again. […] “We had a lot of inquiries about when we were going to reopen. It’s such a good space with plenty of room for 500-plus people. We’ve already got three or four university graduation dinners booked in over the next couple of weeks.”
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Heritage Fund: Latest funding round | recipient building projects

### ODT Online Tue, 20 Oct 2015
Heritage fund contributes to renaissance
By Craig Borley
Another collection of old Dunedin buildings is to get a council cash injection as the city continues its renaissance. The 10 buildings received a combined $113,500 at this month’s meeting of the Dunedin City Council’s heritage fund committee.
Read more + Images

The grants
• Kelsey Yaralla Kindergarten, Trent Ave, North Dunedin: $5000 (earthquake strengthening)
• Golden Leaf International, 16 Manse St: $10,000 (earthquake strengthening)
• Empire Hotel, 395 Princes St: $5500 (earthquake strengthening report, prior to facade restoration)
• Gresham Hotel, 42 Queens Gardens: $20,000 (exterior restoration)
• Former stables, 218 Crawford St – $20,000 (reuse)
• Stafford House, 2 Stafford St – $5000 (fire upgrade)
• Loan and Mercantile Building, 33 Thomas Burns St – $20,000 (facade cleaning and restoration)
• Married quarters, Quarantine Island: $3000 (strengthening)
• Glenfalloch: $5000 (conservation plan update)
• Carpet Court, 115 Cumberland St: $20,000 (reuse)

TOTAL: $113,500

Dunedin Heritage Fund graphic 1DUNEDIN HERITAGE FUND

The Dunedin City Council and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (now Heritage New Zealand) jointly administer the Dunedin Heritage Fund to support the protection and conservation of Dunedin’s built heritage, as well as the continued use and appreciation of these places by the community.

The Heritage Fund Committee has the ability to make grants or loans to the owner or occupier of any historic place within Dunedin for the purpose of assisting that owner or occupier to manage, maintain or preserve that historic place.

The Dunedin Heritage Fund can provide incentive funding for a wide range of works. These include:

i. Essential repairs, stabilisation or core structural works.
ii. Restoration projects.
iii. Upgrades to code/regulation standards to enable contemporary use of heritage places, eg fire, earthquake, access provisions.
iv. Specific “like with like” material replacement/maintenance projects that protect the integrity of heritage buildings (eg slate or timber shingle roofing; copper gutters/downpipes; wooden joinery; stained glass; stonework; pressed tin ceilings; etc)
v. Preparation of heritage conservation plans.
vi. Emergency or protective works to protect heritage fabric.

Note: Routine maintenance will not normally be a high priority for assistance.

█ For more information and guidelines for how to apply, go to:
Dunedin Heritage Funding Application (DCC website)

Contacts:
Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage) 03 477 4000
Jonathan Howard, HNZ Otago Southland Area Manager 03 477 9871

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Vogel Street Party —Sat, 10 October

Vogel St Party banner
Admission: FREE

The inaugural Vogel Street Party was held last year in conjunction with the first ever Dunedin Street Art Festival; this year’s event will again be staged in the warehouse precinct and will collaborate with the Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature group for a party themed around Literature and Light.

LITERATURE To celebrate Dunedin’s creative city status as a UNESCO City of Literature Dunedin, New Zealand. You can find us sitting alongside only 10 other cities in the world that hold this status, including Edinburgh, Melbourne, Dublin, Prague & more.

LIGHT As 2015 is the International Year of Light, the VSP will be Dunedin’s major effort to join in the world-wide celebration of light and light based technologies.

Vogel Street Party image 685083-320448-34 1

The events, exhibitions and activities will follow these themes and showcase the talent and creativity we have hidden in our city.

The Vogel Street Party 2015 — fun attractions for people of all ages.
PARTY STARTS 10 October at 3pm.
Note start times vary for Open Hours at Heritage Buildings.

█ Webpage: http://vogelstparty.nz/

█ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1611938749075531/

█ Download: Vogel Street Party PROGRAMME

OPEN Buildings [excerpt from programme – click to enlarge]

Vogel Street Party 2015 open buildings

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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