Tag Archives: Bureaucracy

Oh noes! One adverse slip of the pen and it’s Over Rover #warehouseprecinct

Property investment, gentrification and residential activity in city blocks ain’t all it’s cracked up to be with businesses and local authorities in cahoots. This ‘sell-out’ happens the world over —welcome to market economics and no protection. Economic development, baby!

PUBLIC ALERT – GOOD ONE, HAMISH MCNEILLY

About “CAR PARKS” and military precision *eheu

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 17:55, May 31 2017
Dunedin students may leave vibrant area after parking spaces cut
By Hamish McNeilly
Students may be driven away by parking changes designed to make Dunedin’s warehouse precinct more vibrant. Otago Polytechnic student Nick Mowat is angry over changes to short-term parking on Vogel St this week. Earlier this year, the Dunedin City Council announced it would cut the number of all-day parks from 75 to 37, and increase the number of short-term parks to 108. None of the remaining all-day parks would be on Vogel St though, which was home to an annual street party celebrating the area’s rejuvenation. Mowat said many students flatted in the old warehouses and were part of the revitalisation of the area. They were disappointed about the parking changes. Despite opposing the changes, residents were issued with a notice from the council saying the changes would go ahead. Council safety team leader  Hjarne Poulsen said: “The parking changes are designed to make the area safer and more dynamic for residents and visitors, and to make it easier for people to get to local businesses.”
Read more

****

[click to enlarge]
DCC Webmap JanFeb 2013

[click to enlarge]

Warehouse Precinct Revitalisation Plan (PDF, 3.6 MB)
This Plan seeks to support the revitalisation to ensure the important historic Warehouse Precinct area becomes a vibrant and successful part of the central city, once again. [DCC weblink]

LGOIMA warehouse precinct investment (2)
Response received from DCC by email attachment on 19 May 2017

[click to enlarge]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

12 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Heritage, Housing, Infrastructure, Media, OAG, Ombudsman, Otago Polytechnic, People, Perversion, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

SH1 Cycleways : the real story

Received from Hilary Calvert
Wed, 22 Feb 2017 12:40 p.m.

[begins]

NZTA has produced a Q and A sheet for their project news update on our cycle lanes along the one-way streets.

An annotated version is provided for reality junkies:

Q: Why is there a need for separated cycleways on the one-way system?

NZTA: Cyclists and pedestrians are over represented in fatal and serious injury crashes. There have been 2 fatalities since 2011. Short-term safety measure were put into place in 2013. Separated cycle lanes are the long-term solution.

Reality: There have been no deaths since the cycle lanes were widened in 2013. The two deaths since 2011 were likely contributed to by the very act of creating cycle lanes in the blind spot of vehicles. Had these cyclists been on the road they would have been safer.

Q: Where else in the country are they using these?

NZTA: These lanes are becoming familiar in major cities including Christchurch. Busy urban routes such as the one-way streets in Dunedin need higher standards of cycle lanes.

Reality: No one in their right mind would direct cyclists to State Highway 1, where all the trucks go. If these two parallel roads were returned to two-way streets, you might put trucks on one and bikes on the other. But this is mad.

Q: Why put the cycleways on the right rather than the left?

NZTA: Because it increases cycle safety and separates them from bus stops.

Reality: Bingo! NZTA has finally realised delivering cyclists to the blind side of trucks is very dangerous. But it was NZTA who chose to do that last time. A simple sorry would be a start.

Q: why not on the right-hand side from Duke St to Otago Museum then?

NZTA: This has been done in response to feedback received and supported by further cycle surveys. And there is a large number of cyclists who use this route who would have to cross the road.

Reality: Really? So feedback overcomes safety? Surely this brings into question whether they really understand the safety issues with the left-hand side. WE all know that cyclists are no different from the rest of us, they will take their bikes on the shortest route they can find. Which will mean that they are spending most of their time not on the new cycle lane. Actually, most of their time will be spent walking around campus because the University won’t let cyclists inside – safety issues, apparently.

Q: What impact will this have on parking?

NZTA: Keeping the cycle lanes on the unsafe side of the road will mean we lose 20 fewer parks. Parking will be provided in high demand areas. (see revised plans).

Reality: We will lose hundreds of parks, particularly in the highest parking areas around the hospital (made worse by the DCC proposal to build on the car parking area at Frederick St). Parking is already squeezed in high demand areas. These guys are in la la land, and I don’t mean the award winning movie.

Q: Will these cycle lanes disrupt traffic flows?

NZTA: The lanes are likely to smooth traffic flows and provide more reliable travel times because there will be fewer parking movements.

Reality: Yes more reliably longer times, which are likely to double for anyone using the one-way streets. More phases for cyclists and pedestrians, more traffic trying to find parks, more time needed to get to hospital appointments. It wasn’t that broke. Why are those from out of town so determined to get in the way of traffic in Dunedin?

Q: How many cyclists are likely to use the cycle lanes?

NZTA: Current usage peaks at 500 per day, but this could easily double. We will measure the change.

Reality: Weasel words. Try looking north from Lower Stuart St along the one-way street. There will be several vehicles on the cycle lanes and likely not even 1 cyclist. The reality is that we are likely to have fewer than 1 cyclist per kilometre of cycleway in Dunedin at any one time. The maximum of 500 is not relevant to the usage in general. (And indeed 500 per day is 500 over 1440 minutes, about one every 3 minutes. At the absolute peak. For a moment in time. So it may double to 1 cyclist at the absolute maximum every 1.5 minutes.) And having measured it later, we are still stuck with the cycle lanes even if they don’t create double the usage. Meanwhile there is no proposed monitoring of the time wasted on getting to hospital appointments, or the time spent by students walking further from free car parking to lectures, or any other flow-on effects of decreased parking where it is currently available.

Q: When is work likely to start?

NZTA: May 2017, taking around 15 months and in such a way as to ensure the one-way system is able to operate effectively and any disruption is kept to a minimum.

Reality: These streets are groaning at the seams already. Our entire one-way system will become impossible to operate usefully, and it will take double the time. By this time those who came to Dunedin because the traffic wasn’t so bad will have the start of every working day diminished and their Dunedin experience effectively destroyed around the central city. We have an elderly population, and this will be the last three years of the lives of some of us.

Q: Who pays and what will it cost?

NZTA: NZTA will pay for the work directly related to the cycle lanes. $8million.

Reality: More weasel words. There are large costs not included in the direct costs. Agencies are keen on doing guestimates of the multiplier effect of benefits to the city for, say, acts at the stadium. What about a study of the likely costs to the city of loss of parking revenue, loss of time spent driving around, loss of time spent walking from vehicles, anxiety around hospital appointments, loss of business for those relying on easy car access for their custom etc. There are also costs for the work connecting roads and footpaths etc between the cycleways and the rest of our DCC infrastructure, and the inevitable landscaping in the vicinity. And then the costs of fixing what we had to redo because none of the agencies are working together. An expensive nightmare.

Q: What is being done to provide more integrated transport in Dunedin?

NZTA: NZTA, DCC and ORC are implementing transport related projects: this is one. These cycle lanes will connect with cycling lanes being considered in North Dunedin linking University, Hospital, Otago Polytechnic and the CBD.

Reality: These institutions are already handy to each other. As regards the University the biggest obstacle to cycling is the size of the campus which cannot be crossed by cyclists.

****

Pity NZTA doesn’t have a booth in the heart of Dunedin where they could come and sit and listen to the issues. Perhaps on the corner of Stuart St and the one-way streets?

[ends]

NZTA Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme
Cycling in Dunedin contributes to improving transport options, providing a more efficient and integrated transport network, improving health, economic and social outcomes and city liveability. The Urban Cycleways Fund, subject to council approval, will help to accelerate the City to Harbour Bridge and the Central City and North East Valley cycle network.

NZTA Urban Cycleways Programme [general information]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

█ GREEN ATTACK ON YOUR BUILT ENVIRONMENT

leisure-cyclist-on-beach-road-cycleway-auckland-nzta-govt-nz-1two-way-separated-cycleway-beach-road-auckland-nzta-govt-nzTwo-way separated cycleway on Beach Road, Auckland [nzta.govt.nz]

15 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Health, Hot air, Infrastructure, Name, New Zealand, NZTA, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Sport, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

DCC strategies needed like a hole in the head

Updated post Tue, 15 Jul 2015 at 2:40 p.m.

### ODT Online Tue, 14 Jul 2015
DCC launches energy plan and environment strategy
By Chris Morris
Two new strategic plans unveiled by the Dunedin City Council should work together. […] The environment strategy aimed to safeguard the environment by reducing the human impact on it, while preparing for the effects of climate change. The draft energy plan’s focus was on energy efficiency and economic development, seeking to boost the city’s energy security and ability to adapt to change, including climate change.
Read more

Report – EDC – 13/07/2015 (PDF, 7.2 MB)
The Energy Plan – Consultation Draft

The following media release has been strongly edited for the avoidance of biliousness and nausea. How many NEW MILITARISTIC strategies does The Public need to hit the climate change / Agenda 21 councillor goofballs on the head once and for all ???!!! In order to return Dunedin City Council to prudent care of core business including, for the most part, infrastructure services and maintenance of ratepayer assets (excluding THE STADIUM, sell for scrap to Mr Hall) —NOT growing the tear-baby imaginations of the culturally, environmentally lost and bewildered. [MacTavish Cull Hawkins Peat et al]

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
DCC launches draft environment strategy

This item was published on 14 Jul 2015

Te Ao Tūroa – The Natural World, a draft environment strategy for Dunedin, was launched at Otakou Marae today […] over 11 thousand submissions were reviewed and analysed before the document was drafted.

[The council is] now seeking feedback on the draft strategy – whether [the council has] correctly identified the right themes, objectives and priorities – and [the council is] calling for ideas about the key goals and actions that should be adopted to drive its implementation. […] General Manager Services and Development Simon Pickford says the strategy is designed to focus not just locally, but also to fit into a wider context that takes account of a range of regional and national legislation, strategies and policies. “This is about sharpening our commitment to protecting our beautiful natural environment. Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities and our natural environment is one of its greatest assets.”

█ Link to draft environment strategy: http://www.teaoturoa.co.nz

Contact Simon Pickford, General Manager Services and Development on 03 474 3707. DCC Link

God save us 14.7.15

A rough sample of recent DCC STRATEGIES, POLICIES and PLANS:
[imagine the staff hours in this lot]

Art in Public Places Policy (Approved: 27 October 2010)
Asset Disposal and Write-off (Approved: 16 March 2015)
Biodiversity Strategy for Dunedin City (Approved: 20 August 2007)
Climate Change Predictions Policy (Approved: 06 September 2011)
Code of Subdivision and Development (Approved: 05 July 2010)
Dangerous, Insanitary and Earthquake-Prone Buildings Policy (Approved: 01 November 2011)
Development Contributions Policy (Approved: 24 June 2014)
Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy 2013 (Approved: ……)
Dunedin Digital Strategy 2010-2013 (Approved: 27 September 2010)
Dunedin Festivals and Events Strategy 2009-19 (Approved: 17 August 2009)
Dunedin Provisional Local Alcohol Policy [June 2015]
Dunedin Visitor Strategy (Approved: 18 August 2008)
Economic Development Strategy (Approved: 17 September 2012)
Financial Strategy (Approved: 25 June 2012)
Fraud Prevention Policy (Approved: 01 December 2014)
Gambling and TAB Venue Policy (Approved: 19 August 2013)
Grants Policy (Approved: December 2014)
Heritage Strategy (Approved: 01 October 2007)
Industry Project Fund Policy (Approved: 18 August 2008)
Internal Audit Policy (Approved: 16 March 2015)
LGOIMA Charging Policy (Approved: 30 November 2009)
Local Governance Statement (Approved: 01 March 2011)
Long Term Plan 2015/16 – 2024/25 (Approved: 29 June 2015)
New Reticulated Utility Services (Water, Wastewater or Stormwater) Policy (Approved: 22 February 2010)
Parking Strategy 2008-2018 (Approved: 14 July 2008)
Peak Oil and the Economy – Background Report (published 01 July 2010)
Peak Oil Vulnerability – Assessment for Dunedin (published 01 August 2010)

Potential Areas of Change Report (Approved: 01 August 2011)
This report summarises the research undertaken for selecting potential areas to encourage more housing and housing choice to be developed through enabling residential intensification and/or redevelopment using design criteria that will provide for good amenity outcomes for residents and neighbours. The report identifies the 14 areas recommended for consultation and potential rezoning.

Protected Disclosure/Whistleblower Policy (Approved: 26 May 2015)
Residential Capacity Study 2009 (published 01 January 2010)
Residential Research Report (published 01 October 2011)
Responsible Camping Policy (Approved: 23 September 2013)

Significance and Engagement Policy (Approved: 01 December 2014)
The Significance and Engagement Policy provides a framework for determining the significance of decisions; and when and how the community can expect to be involved in the Council’s decision-making.

Social Housing Strategy (Approved: 22 February 2010)
Social Wellbeing Strategy 2013-2023 (Approved: ……)

Spatial Plan for Dunedin
The Spatial Plan provides the Council with the building blocks it needs to ensure that, over the next 30-40 years, the city develops in the direction in which you have told us you want it to develop, about where things will be located, their design and their overall effect, and to future-proof the city against the inevitable challenges it will face, such as climate change and peak oil.

Spatial Planning and Centres: Retail in centres and improved social, cultural, and economic performance (published 01 July 2011)
Spatial Strategy for Retailing in Dunedin (Approved: 01 December 2010)
Special Character Areas Report (published 01 October 2011)

Strategic Framework (Approved: ?? 2015)
The DCC’s work is guided by a vision of Dunedin becoming ‘one of the world’s great small cities.’ To deliver on this vision, there are eight key strategies that, with some other things, make up its ‘strategic framework’. Including:
3 Waters Strategic Direction Statement 2010-2060 (Approved: ……)
Spatial Plan (Approved: 17 September 2012)
Economic Development Strategy (Approved: 17 September 2012)
Social Wellbeing Strategy 2013-2023 (Approved: ……)
30-year Integrated Transport Strategy 2013 (Approved: ……).

Treasury Risk Management Policy (Approved: 15 December 2014)

Received from Calvin Oaten at another thread.
Submitted on 2015/07/14 at 2:50 pm

Dunedin has no need to feel it is not progressive. Why, just yesterday the council announced two new ‘strategic plans’. This comes hard on the heels of a continuous screed of ‘strategies’. In recent times there has been the ‘Spatial Plan’ (whatever that is), the ‘Ten, Ten, Ten Plan’, which is aimed at increasing the population by ten percent, increase the job market by ten thousand and the average income by $10,000 pa. Then of course there are the Annual Long Term Plans.

Now we are to have this new draft environment strategy plan to secure the city’s environmental future. Plus the interrelated draft energy plan. These twin initiatives were interrelated because Cr Hawkins says so. Exactly how is yet to be seen in the detail. Cr MacTavish said the “most exciting” part of the plan was a new energy leader’s accord, under which the council would work with major energy users to share energy ideas and other initiatives. “That’s where the magic is going to happen,” she said. Cr Neville Peat said addressing energy issues was “the future of the world”, but “minimal progress” had been made until now. “This will lead us toward a low carbon footprint,” he said. Mayor Dave Cull told the committee meeting the energy plan aimed to tackle issues that were “fundamental” to the city’s economic and social future. “We need to be under no apprehensions — this is hugely important.” Now there’s some ‘learnings’ for Cr Benson-Pope to grapple with. It’s become the norm nowadays to expect this type of ‘silliness’ emanating from council. At what cost one can only wonder. More ‘green ideologies’ running rampant within our Town Hall.

Why, just on the same page of the ODT above these strategic announcements we see “NZ slated for inaction on emissions”, an article in which it cites the comment that “if NZ doesn’t pull up its socks on the global warming issue it would likely exceed 3degC or 4degC — making a world in which oceans would acidify, coral reefs dissolve, sea levels rise rapidly, and more than 40% of species become extinct.”

It is this “silliness” that will be the undoing of Dunedin as it increasingly becomes more and more irrelevant in this world. Energy is the ‘staff of life’ as far as modern society goes, whilst this city’s penchant for divorcing itself from the reality of this fact can only force that irrelevancy. Why history is totally ignored by this current ‘fad’ of ‘carbon’ hatred which is so prevalent is difficult to understand. ‘Horror to Betsy’, the atmosphere is reaching the point where CO2 content is 380-400 ppm. It’s been there before and much much higher and we have still survived. That means that 999,600 ppm is other stuff, mainly water vapour. It is water vapour plus solar cycles that have the greatest influence on Earth’s climate and consequent temperatures, CO2 is in the margin of error. Still, we are beset by this mania and I guess it will have to run its course until the IPCC and these ‘green’ acolytes finally accept the fact that they can no longer ignore history, the empirical facts, accept that they are wrong and there is no warming, sea level rise, and admit that the whole issue is a manmade concoction of ‘computer models’ not meeting the outcomes predicted. Until then Dunedin, like much of the rest of the gullible will tax itself to death and continue to bring forth the type of policies it does. Pity they couldn’t tax the ‘hot air’ within instead of CO2, then the problem would disappear from the political landscape overnight.

Related Post and Comments:
6.4.15 Energy, a little picture #wow

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

47 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Urban design, What stadium

Cr Lee Vandervis: Why I continue to vote. #email

Received.

From: Lee Vandervis
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎4‎ ‎May‎ ‎2015 ‎3‎:‎59‎ ‎p.m.
To: Chris Morris, Elizabeth Kerr, Andrew Noone, Andrew Whiley, Chris Staynes, Doug Hall, Hilary Calvert, John Bezett, Jinty MacTavish, Kate Wilson, Lee Vandervis, Mayor Cull, Mike Lord, Neville Peat, Richard Thomson, David Benson-Pope, Aaron Hawkins, Sue Bidrose, Sandy Graham, News [Ch39]
Subject: Why I continue to vote.

Dear Mr Morris,

Mayor Cull’s ambushed change to the Council Code of Conduct resolution item claims that my apology on which my responsibility for being able to vote apparently hangs “is to be judged by the CEO or her delegate.”

Standing Orders J4.2 clearly says that Council may take Code of Conduct action against a member by means of a three-fourths majority of those present, and the action taken was to demand a genuine apology which I have provided.
I can only genuinely apologise as far as the evidence I am allowed to see permits.
Standing Orders does not empower a CEO’s delegate to rule on the appropriateness of my apology which ruling has the effect of denying my responsibility to vote on behalf of the thousands of Dunedin people that voted for me. That is for Councillors to decide and they have not been given that opportunity.
My legal advice is that there is no legal basis for the Code of Conduct censure being delegated to the DCC chief accountant.
Councillors must vote for such a Code of Conduct action and I believe that Mayor Cull knows he does not have the Councillor numbers to vote for such an action.

Consequently I will continue to vote as before, and it is up to staff whether my votes are properly recorded.
All of this is on the back of a constantly corrupted Code of Conduct process where I have not been allowed to see the evidential statements made against me from Councillors or from CEO Bidrose, and have therefore been unable to defend myself against those evidential statements.
I have obtained consistent legal advice from two different sources in addition to ex-lawyer Cr. Calvert’s opinion printed in the ODT, and these sources do not want the DCC to know who they are as they believe that may prejudice their opportunities for other work in Dunedin. I do not intend to sue Mayor Cull or Council at this stage as I am still hopeful of getting the Deloitte’s information that would be pivotal in any Citifleet fraud cases brought.
I am still not permitted to see the Deloitte Citifleet fraud investigation evidence which would allow me to establish whether Police have in fact, recently investigated appropriately or not.
Time will tell who has been misleading who regarding the Citifleet frauds issue of substance.

Regards,
Cr. Vandervis

█ For more, enter the terms *vandervis*, *cull*, *bidrose*, *citifleet* or *deloitte* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

32 Comments

Filed under Business, Citifleet, DCC, Democracy, Economics, Events, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, People, Police, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, What stadium

Hmmmmmm #DCC

Received from TQoFE
Mon, 4 May 2015 at 2:49 p.m.

█ Message: Sorry Dr Bidrose, but that Big Question still remains to be answered…

Smoke-screen by TQoFE 4.5.15

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Business, Citifleet, DCC, Democracy, Economics, Name, New Zealand, OAG, People, Police, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, What stadium

Cr Vandervis unlikely to quit several missions #coverup #naturaljustice

From ‘City’ colleague with an eye for the law, Wikipedia definition
Fri, 1 May 2015 at 11:00 a.m.

Cover up - Wikipedia (grey paper)

### ODT Online Fri, 1 May 2015
Apology lacking; voting rights go
By Chris Morris
Dunedin city councillor Lee Vandervis has been stripped of his voting rights after failing to apologise before a 24-hour deadline. […] In a statement last night, council group chief financial officer Grant McKenzie said Cr Vandervis was suspended from all council committees from today until July 1.
Read more

****

[Cr Hilary Calvert] questioned the council’s right to delegate to council staff any final judgement on whether Cr Vandervis’ apology was appropriate, arguing that was a call for councillors to make.

“The process was open and fair, and, as far as I’m concerned, completely in accordance with proper meeting procedure. I question the motivation in quibbling about it now.” –Mayor Dave Cull

### ODT Online Fri, 1 May 2015
Mayor dismisses legality questions
By Chris Morris
Mayor Dave Cull has a one-word response to questions about the legality of stripping Cr Lee Vandervis of voting rights: “Whatever.” Mr Cull’s abrupt response came in an email to Cr Hilary Calvert yesterday, as she questioned whether the council had followed proper process when considering its punishment of Cr Vandervis.
Read more

█ For more, enter the terms *vandervis*, *cull*, *bidrose*, *citifleet* or *deloitte* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Cover-up image by whatifdunedin with acknowledgement to Wikipedia

38 Comments

Filed under Business, Citifleet, DCC, Democracy, Economics, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, People, Police, Politics, SFO, What stadium

Burn Robbie Burn!

Received from TQoFE
Thu, 30 Apr 2015 at 12.40 p.m.

Burn-Rabbie-Burn

Calvin Oaten
Submitted on 2015/04/30 at 9:38 am

That guy sitting on his pedestal in the upper Octagon (you know, him wearing all that seagull crap) must be quietly wondering what is going on in this Edinburgh of the south.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under Business, Citifleet, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Name, New Zealand, OAG, People, Pics, Police, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, Site, Tourism, What stadium