Category Archives: Innovation

Prison revives for visitor experience

### ODT Online Sat, 29 Apr 2017
Tourism intended for prison
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s old prison has four new trustees, a new tenant with the tourism market in mind, and is ready to move to a new stage in its evolution. The 121-year-old Victorian-style courtyard facility designed by John Campbell has been returned to its original form. Work to replace decorative architectural elements removed from the front of the building was completed recently. Now the Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust is turning its attention to future uses for the former jail that is one of the city’s more unusual historic buildings. The prison was decommissioned in 2007, and the trust bought the property in 2012. Trust chairman Owen Graham said the physical restoration work was 95% complete — ridge tiles and two 2-metre finials still had to be finished — but it was time to start a new stage of evolution for the building. The new trustees had been appointed for their range of skills and backgrounds, and would help the trust make decisions about what happened next. Those decisions could range from another part-upgrade or “go for a multimillion-dollar effort”. […] Mr Graham said part of the trust’s strategy was to start occupying parts of the prison to sustain its activities and “bring the prison back to life with different activities”. It had been working with a business that wanted to use the prison’s kitchen, which had been identified as “serviceable”.
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The former prison has a Heritage NZ category one classification; future development involves discussion with Dunedin City Council and Heritage New Zealand.

Dunedin Prison | http://www.dunedinprisontrust.co.nz/

[excerpt from the trust’s website]

Timeline
Showing the many phases of use of the prison:
1896-1915 – new prison opened with cells for 52 men and 20 women
1915-1959 – Police move in to administration block and look after prisoners as well as their own duties
1959-1974 – 34 female prisoners are accommodated, segregated from men
1975-1994 – reopened catering for 59 male inmates
1994-2000 – Police move out to their new premises and prison reverts to original purpose as a men only facility
2007 – prison decommissioned and Corrections operation moved to Milburn
2011 – Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust formed to secure the prison for the nation
2012 – Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust raises $50,000 to allow it to purchase the property from Ngai Tahu Property Ltd
2014 – Conservation Plan completed
2015 – Fund-raising begins to allow us to restore the facades and repair part of the slate roof, estimated at $500,000.

Related Posts and Comments:
17.9.15 Dunedin Prison: Community Trust grant for restoration
16.9.15 DPAG exhibition talk, Sun 20 Sep —Jonathan Howard on Dunedin 1865
7.9.15 Public petition to save Courthouse for courts use
30.8.15 DPAG exhibition | Dunedin 1865: A City Rises…
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 ‘The Open City’ … 29 Aug
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 Shoreline Trail launch
11.7.15 Dunedin Law Courts “an incredible historic building” –Minister
14.5.15 Russell Lund on Ministry closure of Dunedin Law Courts
14.5.15 Justice at Dunedin
2.5.15 Ministry serves INJUSTICE for Dunedin Courthouse #HistoricHeritage
28.2.13 Tour the old prison in March (2013)
20.9.12 Dunedin Prison
6.6.12 Dunedin Prison purchased by trust
18.10.11 Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust
5.10.11 Training, jobs, city regeneration

█ For more, enter the term *heritage* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Images: whatifdunedin sketchbook – Dunedin Prison (former)

1 Comment

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‘Big play’ —NZ to spend $53M at Expo 2020, Dubai UAE

[Source: Expo2020 Dubai]

The Government is about to launch a process within the creative sector of New Zealand to select the best team and ideas for the design and content.

### nzherald.co.nz 3:00 PM Sun, 23 Apr 2017
NZ to spend $53m on Dubai Expo
By Grant Bradley – Aviation, tourism and energy writer for Business Herald
The Government will spend $53 million showcasing New Zealand at Expo 2020 in Dubai in an attempt to boost trade in the region and beyond. Economic Development Minister Simon Bridges made the announcement in Dubai today. “It’s a unique and dynamic part of the world. For us this a relatively big play,” Bridges told the Herald. […] When Dubai bid for Expo 2020, its rulers said they would spend more than $10b on a 2 sq km site that will contain three thematic areas: opportunity, sustainability and mobility. New Zealand has been invited to participate in the sustainability precinct. […] While trade runs heavily in US favour, Bridges said the New Zealand pavilion would allow Kiwi businesses to highlight their innovative products and services and open doors to new export markets. New Zealand is close to completing a free trade agreement with the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC), which comprises Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. […] Bridges said participation at the Expo was a carefully calculated strategic investment. “Ultimately this is a pretty hard-headed investment for exporters and the economy. New Zealand being there is essential.” […] New Zealand had signed up early as an exhibitor and it would help its push “against the open door” of trade negotiations.
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ArabianBusiness.com Arabic Published on Apr 3, 2017
Al Wasl Plaza during Expo 2020 Dubai – source :Expo 2020 Dubai
Al Wasl Plaza, the central hub of Expo 2020 Dubai

Expo2020 Dubai Published on Apr 5, 2017
Al Wasl Plaza

Show Me Dubai Published on Dec 7, 2016
8 Billion Dollars Dubai Expo 2020 Master Plan
Dubai’s theme for the Expo is Connecting Minds, Creating the Future. Its proposed schedule is from October 2020 until April 2021, the first Expo to run over two years stretching over UAE’s 49th National Day and touching on UAE’s 50th Jubilee year in 2021. Dubai’s Masterplan proposes a site on 438 hectares of land in Jebel Ali equidistant to the Dubai International Airport and Abu Dhabi International Airport. To support its theme of sustainability, the iconic structure that covers much of the site will have photovoltaic fabric that is planned to generate at least 50% of the Expo’s power on site. Dubai Expo 2020 expects to create 277,149 jobs between 2013 and 2021. 40% of the employment opportunities generated would be in the travel and tourism sector. Dubai Expo 2020 expects to attract 25 million unique visitors and up to 33 million visits over the six-month period. Courtesy: Expo2020 Dubai

Expo 2020 Dubai UAE [website]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

1 Comment

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rough sheds, sydney london

Tinshed by Raffaello Rosselli
Amy Frearson | 21 June 2013 ● Dezeen
Australian architect Raffaello Rosselli has repurposed a corroding tin shed in Sydney to create a small office and studio apartment. Rather than replace the crumbling structure, Raffaello Rosselli chose to retain the rusty corrugated cladding of the two-storey building so that from the outside it looks mostly unchanged. The project embraces that it will continue to change with time through rust, decay and repair.

“The humble tin shed is an iconic Australian structure,” he explains. “As the only remaining shed in the area it is a unique reminder of the suburb’s industrial past.”

The architect began by taking the building apart and replacing its old skeleton with a modern timber frame. He then reattached the cladding over three facades, allowing room for three new windows. The frames of the windows are made from sheets of Corten steel that display the same orange tones as the retained facade.

“The materials have been left raw and honest, in the spirit of its industrial economy,” adds Rosselli. In contrast with the exterior, the inside of the building has a clean finish with white walls and plywood floors in both the ground-floor living space and the first-floor office.
Read more + Images

*Photography by Mark Syke, apart from where otherwise indicated.

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Collage House, London

Dezeen Published on Feb 13, 2017
Movie explores Jonathan Tuckey’s home in a 19th-century workshop 14 years on
Filmmaker Tapio Snellman has documented the ageing process of architect Jonathan Tuckey’s home, 14 years after he overhauled a 19th-century London workshop to create it. The architect, who is the founder of London-based firm Jonathan Tuckey Design, renovated and extended the steel fabricator’s workshop in 2002 to create a unique home for his family and their dog. He left the bare brick walls tarnished with black marks and chose “simple and everyday” materials to rejuvenate the character of the building, but also because they would weather well. Snellman, who shot Collage House in 2016, captures the ageing of these materials – including nicks and scratches on a series metal fixture and doors by splitting the screen into four – a trick he repeats throughout his film. “The split-screen sequences talk about the occupants and about the way architecture is integrated seamlessly with family life and personal expression,” Snellman told Dezeen. “The four simultaneous views create one strong spatial impression without any single image dominating the effect,” he told Dezeen. Both moving and fixed larch plywood panels clad the exterior, while beach plywood sheeting used as a floor lining inside the house, along with a concrete covering. Douglas fir stud work was planed and left exposed to partition spaces. This enables zones of activity to be defined, while also maintaining openness throughout.

Movie explores Jonathan Tuckey’s home in a former London steel workshop
Eleanor Gibson | 13 February 2017 ● Dezeen
This photography taken by James Brittain when the project completed in the early 2000s shows how Tuckey overhauled the industrial building by partially demolishing walls to create a central courtyard. “Plywood has weathered beautifully on both the interior and exterior and the scuff marks of 15 years use now tell the personal story of the family,” Tuckey told Dezeen. “The concrete floors have patinated and subsequently become more beautiful,” he continued. “The exposed brick was already there but continued to age gracefully as it was used to hang pictures and the kids used it to draw on it.” A space that forms a central part of Snellman’s film is the open-plan kitchen-cum-dining room, which occupies the former workshop. Here, he captures diagonal patterns of light that floods in through the long skylight between the original wooden bowstring beams restored by Tuckey. Snellman contrasts colour footage with black and white in the film, as well as tracking members of the family through the house. “The very controlled track shots try to eliminate the viewers awareness of the presence of the camera, as if the space would be seen at its most intimate, when no-one is present,” the filmmaker told Dezeen.

Ground floor plan [click to enlarge]

First floor plan

When renovating the building, Tuckey’s aim was to maintain as many of the building’s existing features as possible, while also creating plenty of playful spaces that catered to his then-young children. He divided the long and narrow building, which widens at the southern end, into three parts. He also demolished one of the existing buildings to create a courtyard and a small pond. The entrance hall and living area occupy the northern end with a mezzanine above, while the kitchen-cum-dining room occupies the central space. A walkway links these spaces to the two-storey structure added to the southern side, which houses the bedrooms and a bathroom. Since the original renovation, Tuckey has reconfigured the arrangement of the bedrooms, as his now teenage daughters needed more space. The children’s bedrooms have moved upstairs from the downstairs, while the single room used by the parents was divided into two interconnected rooms. A pair of hatches in the bedrooms open to the rooftop terrance, which was also only recently completed by the designer.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

7 Comments

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One of the reasons I ❤ NYC

[economist.com]

Installed to celebrate International Women’s Day, the four-foot statue of a young girl staring down Wall Street’s “Charging Bull” was scheduled to be removed this weekend. But sculptor Kristen Visbal created both a symbol of the necessity of female leadership and a sensation. Crowds are flocking to pose with the statue; a petition calling for its permanent installation has attracted over 30,000 signatures. The mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio has said that in “standing up to fear, standing up to power”, the statue “spoke to the moment”. This week he announced that “Fearless Girl” will stay until March 2018. Boston-based investment firm State Street Global Advisors commissioned the statue.

The New York Times Published on Mar 8, 2017
Statue of Courageous Girl Faces Wall Street Bull | The New York Times
As many American women prepare to draw attention to their role in the workplace, a Wall Street firm on Tuesday put up a statue of a girl in front of Lower Manhattan’s bronze bull, fearlessly staring it down.

CNNMoney Published on Mar 8, 2017
State Street: Why we commissioned Wall St. ‘Fearless Girl’
CNNMoney’s Maggie Lake talks with State Street’s Lori Heinel about the importance of diversity on corporate boards and in leadership positions. “What more iconic symbol than to put a young girl as a symbol of women” facing off against The Bull.

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From Twitter feed:

Fox News Published on Apr 14, 2017
‘Charging Bull’ vs ‘Fearless Girl’: Sculptor wants her gone
Sculptor of the New York City’s iconic ‘Charging Bull’ statue is demanding the ‘Fearless Girl’ statue be removed, claiming she is violating his legal rights

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CBS New York Published on Apr 12, 2017
Artistic Showdown Over ‘Fearless Girl’ Statue
CBS2’s Jessica Moore reports.

Associated Press Published on Mar 27, 2017
‘Fearless Girl’ Statue Stays Through Feb. 2018
New York City has decided that the globally popular statue of a young girl staring down Wall Street’s famous “Charging Bull” will remain in place through February 2018. (March 27)
The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats.

Storyful News Published on Mar 8, 2017
Ad Agency Puts ‘Fearless Girl’ Statue Opposite Wall Street’s Charging Bull
Courtesy: State Street Global Advisors/McCann

Dagbladet Published on Mar 7, 2017
Slik ble «Den flyktløse jenta» laget
KVINNEKAMPANJE: Det gigantiske reklamebyrået McCann oppfordrer mer enn 3500 selskaper – som SSGA investerer i på vegne av klienter -til å iverksette tiltak for å øke antall kvinner i styrene. Video: McCann

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

[storyful.com]

5 Comments

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We (Oz, NZ, The World) lost John Clarke #tragic #demoralising

[mrjohnclarkebandcamp.com]

John Morrison Clarke (29 July 1948 – 9 April 2017) was a New Zealand comedian, writer, and satirist.

Born: 29 July 1948, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Died: 9 April 2017 (aged 68), Grampians, Victoria, Australia

Living in Australia since the late 1970s, Clarke was a regular actor and writer on Australian television. He first became known during the mid to late 1970s for portraying a laconic farmer called Fred Dagg on stage, film and television. Gumboot and singlet-clad, Dagg had seven sons all named “Trev”. Clarke also recorded a series of records and cassettes and published several books as Dagg. Thirty years after its release, the first Fred Dagg album, Fred Dagg’s Greatest Hits (1976), remains one of New Zealand’s biggest selling records.

[nz rockstuff]

In 1982 he was nominated for an AFI award for co-writing the acclaimed Paul Cox film Lonely Hearts. He also co-wrote the mini-series Anzacs and provided the voice of Wal Footrot in the feature-length animated film, Footrot Flats: The Dog’s Tale (1986), based on the comic strips by Murray Ball. Towards the end of the 1980s, he featured in a number of other films, and began to be known for his political satire.

In 1989, along with collaborator Bryan Dawe, Clarke introduced weekly satirical mock interviews to television, and these short pieces (usually between 2–5 minutes in duration) became a regular and popular segment of the Nine Network current affairs programme A Current Affair. […] In 2013 the mock interviews became an eponymous program Clarke and Dawe which screened at 6.57pm on ABC TV.

[mrjohnclarke.com]

Clarke was the author of several books, notably two mock compilations of Australian poetry, and The Tournament, a book describing a fictional tennis tournament involving many philosophical and literary figures of the twentieth century. Clarke was inducted into the Logies Hall of Fame in 2008. The Logie was presented to him by long-time collaborator and friend Bryan Dawe.
Read more

█ Website: http://mrjohnclarke.com/

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ClarkeAndDawe Published on Apr 5, 2017
Clarke and Dawe – Complete Cohesion As We Approach the Budget
“Scott Morrison, Federal Treasurer” Originally aired on ABC TV: 06/04/2017
Clarke and Dawe’s most recent segment, takes on Scott Morrison’s preparations for the budget.

ClarkeAndDawe Published on Jul 13, 2016
Clarke and Dawe – Thank God it couldn’t happen here.
“The Unique Circumstances Which Produced the Brexit Vote.” Originally aired on ABC TV: 13/07/2016

ClarkeAndDawe Published on Nov 11, 2015
Clarke and Dawe – The Night the Abbott Went Down
“Scott Morrison, Federal Treasurer” Originally aired on ABC TV: 12/11/2015
Clarke as Scott Morrison sorts through the chaos of the night that Tony Abbott was deposed as leader of the Liberal party.

Umbrella Entertainment Published on Jan 11, 2015
The Games Excerpt
‘Have you measured the 100m track, Mr Wilson?’ Preparations for the Olympics run into a number of unexpected hurdles in this episode of The Games. Featuring John Clarke, Gina Riley, Bryan Dawe and Ross Stevenson, this hit ABC comedy series is a deadpan, surreal and highly satirical look at bureaucrats in the throws of organising the extravaganza that will be the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games.

ClarkeAndDawe Published on Jul 9, 2014
Clarke and Dawe – Asylum Seeker Policy. Proudly Australian.
“Lionel Dropout. Customer Relations Consultant” Originally aired on ABC TV: 10/07/2014

ClarkeAndDawe Uploaded on Jun 23, 2010
Clarke and Dawe – The Front Fell Off
“Bob Collins, Australian Senator” Air date: 26/07/1991processing system.

Suparnovah Uploaded on Mar 25, 2007
Fred Dagg – We Don’t Know How Lucky We Are [1998] Clarke created the character Fred Dagg as a satire of the Kiwi everyman. A farmer, Dagg often appeared on television to express his opinion, often in song, and regularly accompanied by a dog.

So when things are looking really bad
And you’re thinking of giving it away
Remember, New Zealand’s a cracker
And I reckon come what may
If things get appallingly bad
And we’re all under constant attack
Remember, we want to see good clean ball
And for god’s sakes, feed your backs

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

John Clarke and Bryan Dawe [newsapi.com.au]

17 Comments

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iD Dunedin Fashion runway events

Otago Polytechnic Published on Mar 23, 2017
2017 iD International Emerging Designer Awards
Otago Polytechnic is proud to be a sponsor of the iD Dunedin Fashion Week. One of our favourite events is, of course, the iD International Emerging Designer Awards. In this coveted competition, students from Otago Polytechnic compete against others from around the world – this year there are 33 finalists. It’s Australasia’s largest emerging fashion design competition, and this year it’s at Dunedin’s historic railway station. For more info about studying fashion at Otago Polytechnic, rated in the world’s top 50 fashion schools, check out http://www.op.ac.nz/fashion

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At Twitter:

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ID Dunedin Fashion
March 23, 2017

Australian Finalist takes out 13th iD International Emerging Designers Awards
A stand-out Australian emerging designer collection that reinvents archetypal garments including the biker jacket and blazer has won tonight’s 13th annual iD International Emerging Designer Awards held at the Dunedin Railway Station in New Zealand. Australian-based Nehma Vitols from Sydney’s University of Technology tonight took out the H&J Smith $6,000 First Place prize with her collection, ‘XXX’ – described by judges as “inspired”, merging new fabric technology with handcraft while deconstructing familiar silhouettes in an entirely unique way. Paper, silk and cotton merge to form hybrid materials that oscillate between two and three dimensions and between garment and sculpture. During Vitol’s fashion education, the former student from the University of Technology, Sydney, was selected to participate in the Woolmark Global Studio Program in China and the Textile Print Global Studio in Pukshar, India. Alongside her Bachelor of Design, she completed a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies.
The judging panel made up of Tania Carlson, NOM*d’s Margi Robertson, Marc Moore from Stolen Girlfriends Club, Australian fashion editor Georgina Safe, and iD’s international guest for 2017 Paulo Melim Andersson say the standard of finalists at this year’s event was very high. An overriding focus of the designers was on the ocean with aquatic inspired collections and a renewed focus on sustainability. Says Andersson: “All of the collections are a result of research and a commitment to new ideas. There was little evidence of international referencing and instead each finalist created their own vision in a collection that was fresh, unique and original.”
Hosted by ZM’s PJ Harding and Jase Hawkins, 29 international emerging designer collections showed at [last] night’s 13th annual event, supported by Otago Polytechnic.

This year’s winners are:
● The H&J Smith First Prize ($6000) Nehma Vitols, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
● Laffare Second Place ($4000): Lila John, University of Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria
● Gallery De Novo 3rd Place ($2000): Paul Castro, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
● The Fabric Store Award for Excellence in Design worth $3000 (includes $2000 fabric): Tess Norquay, Massey University, Wellington, NZ
● Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall Most Commercial Collection Prize ($1000): Talia Jimenez University of Technology Sydney, Australia
● The NZME and Viva Editorial Prize (awarded to best NZ collection): Megan Stewart, Massey University, Wellington, NZ.
● The Emilia Wickstead Internship: Emily Cameron, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia.

Backstage, Dr Margo Barton from the Otago Polytechnic School of Design and a team of students was in charge of managing the Awards, while Dunedin-based salon Klone Hair, led by Danelle and Karl Radel, took charge of the runway hair creations. Makeup looks for the models, supplied by Aart Model Management and 10 international models from the University of Shanghai Engineering Science, were created by the Revlon sponsored makeup team, led by Christal Allpress.
iD Dunedin Fashion Week is supported by the Dunedin City Council. iD Link

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At Facebook:

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Talented Swedish designer Paulo Melim Andersson is the International Guest Judge for this month’s iD Dunedin Emerging Designer Awards on 23 March. Andersson has designed for top European fashion houses Chloé, Marni Margiela and Zadig & Voltaire during his fashion career and he will show a retrospective collection at the iD Dunedin Fashion Shows at the Dunedin Railway Station on 24 & 25 March. Read more

Paulo Melim Andersson – Chloé 2007 [via fashionnz.co.nz]

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C U R R E N T ● E X H I B I T I O N

17-30 March – MUSE at Gallery De Novo, Stuart St, Dunedin
Dunedin artist Suzy Platt’s fashion illustrations are on show at Gallery De Novo in her new exhibition ‘Muse’. Suzy’s paintings recently caught the attention of renowned British photographer Nick Knight who asked her to illustrate the Haute Couture collections at Paris Fashion Week. The illustrations can also be viewed in London at the SHOWstudio Gallery.

At Facebook:

Related Post and Comments:
5.3.17 iD Dunedin Fashion Week 2017 [includes videos]

Posted by Elizbeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

11 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Coolness, Design, Dunedin, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pet projects, Public interest, Tourism

Murray Ball, ONZM

Murray Hone Ball ONZM (26 Jan 1939 – 12 Mar 2017) was a New Zealand cartoonist who became known for his Stanley the Palaeolithic Hero (the longest running cartoon in Punch magazine), Bruce the Barbarian, All the King’s Comrades (also in Punch) and the long-running Footrot Flats comic series. In 2002 Ball became an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for his services as a cartoonist. More

gisborneherald Published on Mar 12, 2017
Murray Ball, Footrot Flats cartoonist, dies at 78
New Zealand has lost its most loved cartoonist, Gisborne’s Murray Ball.
Best known for the memorable characters in his cartoon strip Footrot Flats, the widely-respected artist died at home at 11.30am yesterday surrounded by family.

His wife Pam, three children and grandchildren were there, as well as Mr Ball’s brother Barry and close friends. Mr Ball had been out of the public eye due to Alzheimer’s, which he lived with for eight years. He was aged 78.
“It was a terribly sad and emotional day yesterday,” said Mr Ball’s wife Pam. “It was expected but it was terrible to see him go. It was lovely to have family and friends there but it was so, so hard the moment he went.” The family had received some wonderful tributes from around the world, she says.

Mayor Meng Foon described Mr Ball as a legend in our community. On behalf of the community, and the art in public places committee, he extended his heartfelt condolences to the Ball family. “Murray made us laugh, reflect and inspired us as proud New Zealanders. It was a great honour to present Murray’s key collection of cartoon books to the Beijing Olympic committee in 2008.” Mr Foon is pleased Wal and Dog will take pride of place at the entrance of the re-developed library. Murray, your legacy will take pride in Bright Street, a fitting place for such a bright shining star of our creative community.”

Gisborne artist and art teacher Norman Maclean remembers Mr Ball as a man of the soil who loved the country, animals and bird life. He also remembers him as a fine artist, although Mr Ball disagreed. “Murray used to say he was not an artist — which was ridiculous. His command of line was outstanding. For a time he broke into painting. His paintings were forceful, with a very strong line and a strong sense of immediacy.” The cartoonist’s sense of fun came to light while out riding with Mr Maclean. “The first time out he gave me a huge horse called Black. Murray knew what he would do at a certain point and that was to turn home. Black took off, my feet flew out of the stirrups and I heard hoots of laughter behind me.” Mr Ball was a complex figure though, says Mr Maclean. He was very serious-minded. “He thought deeply about political and social matters and had a great sense of justice and of a fair go for the average person.” Although he ascribed to no religion, he described himself as a Christian socialist and enjoyed many arguments with Mr Maclean about religion and philosophy.

In a tribute to Mr Ball, Prime Minister Bill English describes the Gisborne cartoonist as a thoughtful New Zealander “who took our unique sense of humour to the world”.

Cartoonist Tom Scott, who co-wrote the screenplay for Footrot Flats: The Dog’s Tale, told the New Zealand Herald Mr Ball was “funny and goofy and generous, and incredibly serious about inequality”. “He mourned the New Zealand he remembered being fair, and I guess if he had his life over again Murray would rather have been an editorial cartoonist.” Mr Scott also remembers Mr Ball as “an unbelievably strong, fit, handsome man all his life”.

New Zealand Herald cartoonist Rod Emmerson said Footrot Flats captured the essence of New Zealand farm life. “But farm life is virtually the same the world over, hence it quickly became a household icon both here and abroad. How lucky are we to have had the pleasure of Murray Ball’s home-grown genius to entertain us when we needed it most.”

The funeral service will be held at Bushmere Arms on Friday at 1pm.

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thatdickgmail Published on Oct 4, 2012
Footrot Flats Rugby Scene

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

GMRedWing Published on Jun 18, 2015
Footrot Flats – Wal’s Date gone wrong
Footrot Flats: The Dog’s Tale

9 Comments

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