Tag Archives: New Zealand

Maggie Lawton, RIP

Received from Russell Garbutt
Tue, 14 Mar 2017 at 12:47 p.m.

Extremely sad to learn this morning that Maggie Lawton died yesterday at Wanaka following a diagnosis of cancer a short time ago.
Maggie was the top polling candidate in the Dunstan Ward for the Otago Regional Council in the last Local Body Elections and she brought to the role a huge passion for the quality of our region’s waterways and lakes. Extraordinarily well qualified and a vast experience in all things water, her death will mean a huge loss in the Central Otago/Lakes area as well as a strong voice for the wider region. Just a few days ago we were emailing each other and she had said that she was amazed how cancer is both so random and so rampant.
Sincere condolences to her family, friends and colleagues.

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Otago Regional Council
ORC mourns Cr Lawton’s untimely passing
Tuesday, 14 March 2017
Otago Regional Council chairman Stephen Woodhead today noted with sorrow the passing of Dunstan constituency representative Maggie Lawton on Sunday after a brief but determined battle with cancer.
Mr Woodhead said Cr Lawton, who was elected to the council as the constituency’s top-polling candidate at last year’s local government elections, was passionate about environmental issues and the region she served, and particularly water quality.
As chairwoman of the council’s technical committee, her contribution, while brief, was an indication of the time and effort she intended to put into her role as an elected member during the remainder of the 2016-2019 triennium, he said.
“All of us at ORC mourn Maggie’s untimely passing, and extend our heartfelt condolences to her family and friends.”
ORC Link

At Facebook:

Tue, 14 Mar 2017
ODT: ORC pays tribute to late councillorThe Otago Regional Council is mourning and paying tribute to one of its own, following the death of Dunstan constituency representative Maggie Lawton. The Wanaka-based councillor was diagnosed with cancer about two months ago, after it was discovered during an operation, and died yesterday. She was 67 …. Cr Lawton told the Otago Daily Times last week she was determined to make sure the concerns of her constituents were still heard at the council and was receiving treatment at home, but still taking part in council business.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under Central Otago, Democracy, Dunedin, Geography, Name, New Zealand, ORC, People, Politics, Public interest, Queenstown Lakes

Murray Ball, ONZM

Murray Hone Ball ONZM (26 Jan 1939 – 12 Mar 2017) was a New Zealand cartoonist who became known for his Stanley the Palaeolithic Hero (the longest running cartoon in Punch magazine), Bruce the Barbarian, All the King’s Comrades (also in Punch) and the long-running Footrot Flats comic series. In 2002 Ball became an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for his services as a cartoonist. More

gisborneherald Published on Mar 12, 2017
Murray Ball, Footrot Flats cartoonist, dies at 78
New Zealand has lost its most loved cartoonist, Gisborne’s Murray Ball.
Best known for the memorable characters in his cartoon strip Footrot Flats, the widely-respected artist died at home at 11.30am yesterday surrounded by family.

His wife Pam, three children and grandchildren were there, as well as Mr Ball’s brother Barry and close friends. Mr Ball had been out of the public eye due to Alzheimer’s, which he lived with for eight years. He was aged 78.
“It was a terribly sad and emotional day yesterday,” said Mr Ball’s wife Pam. “It was expected but it was terrible to see him go. It was lovely to have family and friends there but it was so, so hard the moment he went.” The family had received some wonderful tributes from around the world, she says.

Mayor Meng Foon described Mr Ball as a legend in our community. On behalf of the community, and the art in public places committee, he extended his heartfelt condolences to the Ball family. “Murray made us laugh, reflect and inspired us as proud New Zealanders. It was a great honour to present Murray’s key collection of cartoon books to the Beijing Olympic committee in 2008.” Mr Foon is pleased Wal and Dog will take pride of place at the entrance of the re-developed library. Murray, your legacy will take pride in Bright Street, a fitting place for such a bright shining star of our creative community.”

Gisborne artist and art teacher Norman Maclean remembers Mr Ball as a man of the soil who loved the country, animals and bird life. He also remembers him as a fine artist, although Mr Ball disagreed. “Murray used to say he was not an artist — which was ridiculous. His command of line was outstanding. For a time he broke into painting. His paintings were forceful, with a very strong line and a strong sense of immediacy.” The cartoonist’s sense of fun came to light while out riding with Mr Maclean. “The first time out he gave me a huge horse called Black. Murray knew what he would do at a certain point and that was to turn home. Black took off, my feet flew out of the stirrups and I heard hoots of laughter behind me.” Mr Ball was a complex figure though, says Mr Maclean. He was very serious-minded. “He thought deeply about political and social matters and had a great sense of justice and of a fair go for the average person.” Although he ascribed to no religion, he described himself as a Christian socialist and enjoyed many arguments with Mr Maclean about religion and philosophy.

In a tribute to Mr Ball, Prime Minister Bill English describes the Gisborne cartoonist as a thoughtful New Zealander “who took our unique sense of humour to the world”.

Cartoonist Tom Scott, who co-wrote the screenplay for Footrot Flats: The Dog’s Tale, told the New Zealand Herald Mr Ball was “funny and goofy and generous, and incredibly serious about inequality”. “He mourned the New Zealand he remembered being fair, and I guess if he had his life over again Murray would rather have been an editorial cartoonist.” Mr Scott also remembers Mr Ball as “an unbelievably strong, fit, handsome man all his life”.

New Zealand Herald cartoonist Rod Emmerson said Footrot Flats captured the essence of New Zealand farm life. “But farm life is virtually the same the world over, hence it quickly became a household icon both here and abroad. How lucky are we to have had the pleasure of Murray Ball’s home-grown genius to entertain us when we needed it most.”

The funeral service will be held at Bushmere Arms on Friday at 1pm.

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thatdickgmail Published on Oct 4, 2012
Footrot Flats Rugby Scene

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

GMRedWing Published on Jun 18, 2015
Footrot Flats – Wal’s Date gone wrong
Footrot Flats: The Dog’s Tale

9 Comments

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Downer EDI buys Hawkins businesses

At Facebook:

Downer EDI – Media Release
Downer acquires Hawkins businesses in New Zealand

08/03/2017
Downer EDI Limited (Downer) announced today that it had signed an agreement to acquire the construction, infrastructure and project management businesses of Hawkins, a New Zealand company, from the McConnell Family.
The Chief Executive of Downer, Grant Fenn, said Hawkins was an excellent strategic fit for Downer’s New Zealand business.
“Downer has a long and proud history in New Zealand that can be traced back more than a century,” Mr Fenn said. “Today we are a leading provider of services to our customers in a range of markets including transport, telecommunications and water.
“Hawkins is a New Zealand industry leader in construction and infrastructure and this acquisition will complement our existing Engineering, Construction and Maintenance capabilities while also providing a platform for growth. It is estimated that over NZ$50 billion will be invested in non-residential construction in New Zealand over the next five years.”
Mr Fenn said Hawkins would continue to operate under its current brand.
“Hawkins was founded in New Zealand 70 years ago and its highly skilled management team has built a strong reputation for delivering quality projects for its customers in both the public and private sectors,” he said.
Hawkins has a number of high profile projects across its portfolio including the SH16 Lincoln to Westgate upgrade, the construction of Auckland’s Park Hyatt Hotel, the Pier B Extension at Auckland Airport, Wellington Airport’s Rongotai Control Tower, Wellington City Council’s Arlington Housing Project, the Christchurch Town Hall, and the Avon River Precinct (Christchurch).
Mr Fenn said the acquisition would be funded through existing debt facilities and be earnings accretive in its first year.
The transaction is due to be completed on 31 March.

[ends] Downer EDI Link

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Hawkins – Media Release
Hawkins Ownership to Change

8th March 2017

Hawkins is pleased to announce that Downer is acquiring Hawkins’ construction, infrastructure and project management businesses from the McConnell Family. This offers a new era of opportunity for both organisations. Hawkins Construction will retain its brand and continue as an ongoing business. Hawkins Infrastructure, which complements Downer, will be integrated into its existing Infrastructure business. Together we look forward to continuing our proud New Zealand heritage of building better communities, with passionate people and great projects. Link

[Hawkins full announcement]

DOW / Announcements
Downer acquires Hawkins business in New Zealand
8:39am, 8 Mar 2017 | ASSET

8 March 2017
DOWNER ACQUIRES HAWKINS BUSINESSES IN NEW ZEALAND
Downer EDI Limited (Downer) announced today that it had signed an agreement to acquire the construction, infrastructure and project management businesses of Hawkins, a New Zealand company, from the McConnell Family.
The Chief Executive of Downer, Grant Fenn, said Hawkins was an excellent strategic fit for Downer’s New Zealand business.
“Downer has a long and proud history in New Zealand that can be traced back more than a century,” Mr Fenn said. “Today we are a leading provider of services to our customers in a range of markets including transport, telecommunications and water.
“Hawkins is a New Zealand industry leader in construction and infrastructure and this acquisition will complement our existing Engineering, Construction and Maintenance capabilities while also providing a platform for growth. It is estimated that over NZ$50 billion will be invested in non-residential construction in New Zealand over the next five years.”
Mr Fenn said Hawkins would continue to operate under its current brand.
“Hawkins was founded in New Zealand 70 years ago and its highly skilled management team has built a strong reputation for delivering quality projects for its customers in both the public and private sectors,” he said.
Hawkins has a number of high profile projects across its portfolio including the SH16 Lincoln to Westgate upgrade, the construction of Auckland’s Park Hyatt Hotel, the Pier B Extension at Auckland Airport, Wellington Airport’s Rongotai Control Tower, Wellington City Council’s Arlington Housing Project, the Christchurch Town Hall, and the Avon River Precinct (Christchurch).
Mr Fenn said the acquisition would be funded through existing debt facilities and be earnings accretive in its first year.
The transaction is due to be completed on 31 March.

For further information please contact:
Michael Sharp, Group Head of Corporate Affairs and Investor Relations +61 439 470 145

About Downer
Downer EDI Limited (Downer) is a leading provider of services to customers in markets including: Transport Services; Rail; Mining; Utilities Services; Technology and Communications Services; and Engineering, Construction & Maintenance. We build strong relationships of trust with our customers, truly understanding and predicting their needs and bringing them world leading insights and solutions. Downer employs about 19,000 people across more than 200 sites and projects, mostly in Australia and New Zealand, but also in the Asia-Pacific region, South America and Southern Africa. For more on Downer, visit: http://www.downergroup.com.

About Hawkins
Hawkins was established in Hamilton in 1946 by Fred Hawkins and has steadily grown over seven decades to become a leader in New Zealand’s infrastructure and project delivery. Hawkins employs about 700 people and specialises in the design and construction delivery of buildings and infrastructure that create stronger communities across New Zealand and also the Asia Pacific. For more information on Hawkins, visit http://www.hawkins.co.nz

Attachments
Downer acquires Hawkins business in New Zealand (PDF)

[ends] Hawkins Link

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Cadbury public protest in the Octagon —Saturday, 11 March 11 a.m.

At Facebook:

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Tue, 7 Mar 2017
ODT: Cadbury protest planned
Dunedin residents against the proposed closure of the Cadbury factory will have a chance to express their opposition at a protest on Saturday morning from 11 o’clock. Last month Mondelez International, the owner of Cadbury, said the factory would close next year, leaving about 400 people without jobs.
Save Cadbury Community Action Group chairman Don Pryde said the protest in the Octagon would show Mondelez “we are not letting go without a fight”. “To date the Dunedin community has not been able to express its anger and dismay over the plans by Mondelez to shut this factory down. This is a chance for people to have their voices heard.”

Related Post and Comments:
16.2.17 Cadbury, wtf ?

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Images: cadbury.co.nz – chocolate crumb | ytimg.com – cadbury, tweaked by whatifdunedin [removals]

42 Comments

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Bill English PM : Super changes

john-key-54-and-bill-english-54-in-aug-2015-david-white-fairfax-via-stuff-co-nz-1

“New Zealanders are healthier and living longer so adjusting the long-term settings of NZ Super while there is time for people to adapt is the right thing to do.” –Bill English PM

### NZ Herald Mon, 6 Mar 2017 3:19 PM
PM Bill English announces Super changes [+ Videos]
The eligibility age for superannuation will rise to 67 years old by 2040, Prime Minister Bill English revealed this afternoon. In a major political development, English promised to begin progressively lifting the threshold from 65 to 67 years old in 2037. That means the changes will not affect anyone born on or before 30 June, 1972. The Government will not act on the promise until after the general election in September.

English said the major change would be legislated for next year. The Government will also limit superannuation eligibility to people who have lived in New Zealand for 20 years, rather than 10 years. That is lower than the commissioner’s recommendation of 25 years. English said the new residency requirement would apply to people who arrived in the country after the law was passed – likely to be next year if the National-led Government remains in power.

Other settings such as linking NZ Super to the average wage and universal Super without means-testing would remain unchanged. The age at which people could access Kiwisaver would remain at 65.

In justifying the change, English noted that even someone who retired at age 67 was likely to receive NZ Super for longer than someone who retired at age 64 today. “That is because average life expectancy is increasing by about 1.3 years each decade.”

The changes to the age of eligibility and residency requirements would save the Government at estimated 0.6 per cent of GDP or $4 billion once fully phased in.

Finance Minister Steven Joyce said New Zealanders’ life expectancy had risen by 12 years over the past 60 years. “When the age was set at 65 in 2001, a retiree could expect to spend about a fifth of their life receiving NZ Super. That has since increased to about a quarter. Following this change, those eligible for NZ Super at 67 in 2040 can still expect to receive it for a quarter of their life on average.”

Experts have said the Government will have to do more than raise the age of eligibility to keep the Super scheme affordable. The cost of the scheme is expected to triple in the next 20 years from $11 billion to $36b as more people reach the over-65 age-group and live for longer.

….English said raising the retirement age in 2037 would more fairly spread the costs and benefits of NZ Super between generations, ensure it remained affordable, and would give people time to adjust. It would also bring New Zealand into line with other countries like Australia, the UK, Denmark, Germany and the United States. English said he did not think his proposals would damage National’s chance of winning a fourth term. “I think they will enhance it,” he said.
Read more

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At Facebook:

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: stuff.co.nz – John Key (54) and Bill English (54) in August 2015. Photo by David White/Fairfax, tweaked by whatifdunedin

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Lorde’s new release better in audio #screenplayAWFUL #BRATalert

The Edge NZ Published on Mar 2, 2017
Lorde gets all emotional about the meaning behind Green Light
In an exclusive interview with The Edge, Lorde opened up about the meaning behind her new single, Green Light.

The Edge NZ Published on Mar 2, 2017
Lorde reveals what she spends her millions on
Lorde revealed in an exclusive interview with The Edge what she spends her millions on.

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LordeVEVO Published on Mar 2, 2017
Lorde – Green Light
Official video for ‘Green Light’, from the new album Melodrama.
Directed by Grant Singer | Produced by Saul Germaine | Executive Producer Nina Soriano | Director of Photography Steve Annis | Production Designer Page Buckner | Edited by Nate Gross | For Anonymous Content

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### billboard.com
Lorde’s ‘Green Light’: A Brilliant Songwriter Enters Her Prime
By Jason Lipshutz 3 Feb 2017
Quick question: What’s the most impressive thing about Lorde?
Take a breath, because there’s really no wrong answer here. You could say it’s her prodigy status and how quickly and thoroughly she achieved her international success: when “Royals”, her debut single, hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in October 2013, Ella Yelich-O’Connor was 16 years old, making her the youngest solo artist to reach the top of the chart since Tiffany in 1988.
You could nod to her singular style, previously a strain of dark pop defined by its sparseness, programmed beats, slower tempos and swirling hooks, all anchored by a voice that can rattle off details (“gold teeth, Grey Goose, trippin’ in the bathroom, bloodstains, ball gowns, trashin’ the hotel room”) and sprawl out in space (“And we’ll never be rooooyals”) with the same fortitude. Since her debut project Pure Heroine — which has sold 1.66 million copies to date, according to Nielsen Music — was released nearly four years ago, its sound has helped define top 40 thanks to smashes by The Weeknd, Alessia Cara and Tove Lo, among others.
Or maybe it’s her consistency: Pure Heroine remains a 10-track opus bursting with ideas about love, loneliness and lack of representation within modern music, while most of Lorde’s non-Heroine material — her Hunger Games single “Yellow Flicker Beat,” her Disclosure collaboration “Magnets” — is just as textured and carefully orchestrated. Some of Lorde’s songs are better than others, but they’re never phoned-in or forgettable.
So, again, really no wrong answer here. But with “Green Light,” a comeback single that barges into your heart on its first play, Lorde makes a good case that her songwriting, above all else, is her strongest asset.
Read more

Hate the fake tan in the vid.

But I hear sounds in my mind
Brand new sounds in my mind

Sometimes I wake up in a different bedroom
I whisper things, the city sings ’em back to you

THAT WAS FAR TOO MUCH OF THE SPOILTCRASS THAT IS LORDE
Signing off…….

sparkle I’m waiting for it, that green light, I want it

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Cadbury, wtf ?

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### ODT Online Thu, 16 Feb 2017
BREAKING NEWS
350 jobs to go as Cadbury closes
By Dene Mackenzie
After years of speculation and concern, the Cadbury factory in Dunedin will finally close next year, leaving about 350 people facing an uncertain future. Staff were told of the closure at a meeting on site at 10am.
The popular tourism attraction Cadbury World is closed today but will reopen tomorrow.
Mondelez International, the owner of Cadbury, confirmed the closure this morning telling its staff 200 people would be made redundant by the end of the year.
Read more

### ODT Online Thu, 16 Feb 2017
Cadbury World to remain open in Dunedin
Dunedin tourist attraction Cadbury World will remain open despite the planned closure of Cadbury’s manufacturing plant in the city. Cadbury owner Mondelēz International today announced its plan to move manufacturing to Australia, with the loss of 350 jobs in Dunedin. In a statement the company said it remained committed to Cadbury World, which attracts 110,000 visitors a year.
Read more

█ Dunedin, One of the World’s Great Small Cities… Really ?

The future:
Not much chocolate, no Safe and Secure electricity, no developing population.
Dunedin: Dead and inDebted, with Dave.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

72 Comments

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