Tag Archives: Innovation

WikiHouse.cc | open source construction set

WikiHouse is an Open Source construction system that makes it possible for anyone to design, download, adapt, share and ‘print’ CNC-milled* high-performance, low-cost houses that they can assemble by hand with minimal formal skill or training, anywhere.

WikiHouse is a non-profit project, developing hardware and software which is open and shared in the commons, owned by everyone.

WikiHouse diagram 1

The purpose of the WikiHouse construction set is that the end structure is ready to be made weathertight using cladding, insulation, damp-proof membranes and windows. WikiHouse is still an experiment in its early stages.

*CNC means Computer Numerical Control. A computer converts the design produced by Computer Aided Design software (CAD), into numbers. The numbers can be considered to be the coordinates of a graph and they control the movement of the cutter. In this way the computer controls the cutting and shaping of the material.

Visit the Open library and read the Design guide.

All the information shared on WikiHouse.cc is offered as an open invitation to the interested public, collaborators and co-developers who are interested in putting Open Source solutions to these problems in the public domain. If you are working on one of these, or would like to know (or do) more, please contact WikiHouse.

TED 23 May 2013

Alastair Parvin: Architecture for the people by the people
Architect Alastair Parvin presents a simple but provocative idea: what if, instead of architects creating buildings for those who can afford to commission them, regular citizens could design and build their own houses? The concept is at the heart of Wikihouse.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

WikiHouse 2 (1)WikiHouse 1 (1)WikiHouse construction set (1)

Another profile:
WikiHouse prototype (1)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: Jaunt to USA, explain

Dunedin at night [commons.wikimedia.org] 1Dunedin, March 2010. Benchill (Wikimedia Commons).

### ODT Online Fri, 3 Jan 2014
Streetlight ideas from US trip
By Debbie Porteous
Seeing the bright lights of some major American cities has given the man responsible for a street lighting revolution set for Dunedin some solid ideas. Dunedin city council roading maintenance engineer Peter Standring went to the United States last year to look at different technologies and visit cities that have started updating their street lighting.
Read more

Puzzled. The news story says Peter Standring went to USA.
But lower down, it says (our emphasis):

“Los Angeles was in many ways the world leader in the procurement, installation and development of LED technology, and the group was “very lucky” to have had one and a-half hours of Mr Ebrahimian’s time, Mr Standring said.”

What group? A DCC group? (or a USA group he tagged along with?) What have we paid for? A 2013 trip for one person to Los Angeles, Durham, Racine, Chicago, Phoenix and San Francisco —or a trip for a group of staff and their wives?
Clarification, please.

****

[via Upstart Incubator (@UpstartDunedin) who tweeted at 9:29 AM on Tue, Dec 31, 2013]

### mckinsey.com September 2013
How to make a city great
By 2030, 60 percent of the world’s population will live in cities. That could mean great things for economic growth — if the cities handle their expansion wisely. Here’s how.

What makes a great city? It is a pressing question because by 2030, 5 billion people — 60 percent of the world’s population — will live in cities, compared with 3.6 billion today, turbocharging the world’s economic growth. Leaders in developing nations must cope with urbanisation on an unprecedented scale, while those in developed ones wrestle with aging infrastructures and stretched budgets. All are fighting to secure or maintain the competitiveness of their cities and the livelihoods of the people who live in them. And all are aware of the environmental legacy they will leave if they fail to find more sustainable, resource-efficient ways of managing these cities.

Explore six diverse initiatives aimed at making cities great places to live and work.

To understand the core processes and benchmarks that can transform cities into superior places to live and work, McKinsey developed and analysed a comprehensive database of urban economic, social, and environmental performance indicators. The research included interviewing 30 mayors and other leaders in city governments on four continents and synthesizing the findings from more than 80 case studies that sought to understand what city leaders did to improve processes and services from urban planning to financial management and social housing.

The result is How to make a city great (PDF, 2.1MB), a new report arguing that leaders who make important strides in improving their cities do three things really well:

█ They achieve smart growth. Smart growth identifies and nurtures the very best opportunities for growth, plans ways to cope with its demands, integrates environmental thinking, and ensures that all citizens enjoy a city’s prosperity. Good city leaders also think about regional growth because as a metropolis expands, they will need the cooperation of surrounding municipalities and regional service providers. Integrating the environment into economic decision making is vital to smart growth: cities must invest in infrastructure that reduces emissions, waste production, and water use, as well as in building high-density communities.

█ They do more with less. Great cities secure all revenues due, explore investment partnerships, embrace technology, make organisational changes that eliminate overlapping roles, and manage expenses. Successful city leaders have also learned that, if designed and executed well, private–public partnerships can be an essential element of smart growth, delivering lower-cost, higher-quality infrastructure and services.

█ They win support for change. Change is not easy, and its momentum can even attract opposition. Successful city leaders build a high-performing team of civil servants, create a working environment where all employees are accountable for their actions, and take every opportunity to forge a stakeholder consensus with the local population and business community. They take steps to recruit and retain top talent, emphasise collaboration, and train civil servants in the use of technology.

Mayors are only too aware that their tenure will be limited. But if longer-term plans are articulated — and gain popular support because of short-term successes — leaders can start a virtuous cycle that sustains and encourages a great urban environment.
Link to source

McKinsey&Company The material on this page draws on the research and experience of McKinsey consultants and other sources. To learn more about their expertise, visit the Infrastructure Practice, Public Sector Practice, Sustainability & Resource Productivity Practice.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: commons.wikimedia.org – Central city view of Dunedin, New Zealand, at night from Signal Hill lookout. The dark horizontal band above the centre of the photo is the Town Belt. Some landmarks including First Church of Otago and the Dunedin Railway Station are visible near the centre. Photo by Benchill, 9 March 2010.

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Dunedin cycleways: Calvin Oaten greeted by DCC silence

Received.
Tuesday, December 03, 2013 4:38 PM

Subject: Fwd: Transport Strategy

Calvin Oaten notes:
As you can see I copied [the below] to most. So far, the only response has been Cr Lee Vandervis. He agrees. [Chief executive] Sue Bidrose hasn’t come back with so much as a “rubbish” or “interesting”.
The rest, well I am wondering if this new crop are going to be any better than the last. You would think I would get shot out of the water by at least Cr Richard Thomson, but nothing. All I want is to open up the debate.
Looks like it is just too hard for them to think about the issue. Get elected, get the remuneration sorted and then back to sleep. “El Duce”, of course, wishes I was on another planet.

—— Forwarded Message
From: Calvin Oaten
Date: 1 December 2013 11:33:36 AM NZDT
To: Dave Cull
Cc: Hilary Calvert, Jinty McTavish, Lee Vandervis, John Bezett, Kate Wilson, Chris Staynes, Mike Lord, Aaron Hawkins, Neville Peat, Doug Hall, Andrew Noone, David Benson-Pope, Sue Bidrose, Richard Thomson
Subject: Fwd: Transport Strategy

Hello Dave,
I have been reading the article Sharing the Road by Shane Gilchrist in Saturday’s ODT, and was particularly interested in your comments. You point out the reason why council began this process in the first place: “It’s about safety on Dunedin’s one-way system.” “Council, in collaboration with the NZTA, is both resolved and obligated to make our one-way street system safer. That’s what we asked NZTA to do after the last death. Let’s be clear: It is the NZTA’s responsibility to make state highways safer.” A very laudable position, but is the seeming solution necessarily the right one?

To me it is a philosophical question: If it is purely about safety and preservation of life then surely cyclists on the one-way would be wrong. History has proven that. If it is about ‘freedom of choice’ then it would be a matter for responsible persons or parents to weigh up the situation then opt for a choice, it being on their own heads. Either way, nothing would need to be done to alter the status quo. I would have no problem with that.

Then there is the matter of alternatives. Continue reading

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NHNZ development mode (new business, markets)

“It’s like the next version of NHNZ. It’s like NHNZ version 3.1 in a lot of ways, version one being when we were part of TVNZ, version two being when [former managing director] Michael Stedman took over and gave us a new lease of life, and this is another step.” –Kyle Murdoch, NHNZ

### ODT Online Wed, 27 Nov 2013
Children’s TV for NHNZ
By Vaughan Elder
Dunedin’s NHNZ is preparing to take on the likes of Disney with the launch of its own international children’s television channel. NHNZ managing director Kyle Murdoch said, in preparation for the launch of the channel next February, 54 staff were hard at work in Dunedin producing content for it. About 40 were new staff who had joined the office since the middle of this year.
Read more

● Michael Stedman, former managing director, retired at the beginning of this year.

NHNZ website (detail)Natural History New Zealand website [screenshot detail]

Wikipedia: NHNZ

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin cycleways: Calvin Oaten’s alternative route

Text received. Sunday, 17 November 2013 11:06 a.m.
The comment also appears at ODT Online (link supplied). -Eds

Some lateral thinking required?
Submitted by Calvin Oaten on Sat, 16/11/2013 – 3:03pm.
In all this discussion on the merits or otherwise of catering specifically for cyclists to have safe means of traversing central Dunedin, it seems that it is the safety which is being lost sight of. Surely, in a survey of recent cyclist fatalities in Dunedin, they have by far and away happened on the SH1 one ways. So why on earth do the authorities insist on staying on those routes? Is there no alternatives?

Let’s look at this. The main trip of concern is from Normanby to the Oval. Start at Normanby on North Rd (not an arterial way) travel to the Gardens, then along Gt King St to the Gardens side gate and onto the cycle/footpath, already existing, to Duke St, down to Castle or Leith Sts. Along to Dundas St and down to Forth St. Along Forth St to St Andrew St. Along Anzac Ave to the Railway Station. Along the station forecourt then onto railway land and proceed behind the Settlers museum and Chinese Garden, across Rattray St and along behind the Box Retail area to Andersons Bay Rd.

Problems? Negotiations would be needed to obtain an easement through the railway land and a lane constructed to suit. Advantages: No fatalities on SH1, No parking to be forfeited. No alteration to the landscaping. Face it, all those mature trees along both route are very efficient ‘carbon sinks’ and one would expect cyclists to appreciate the value of those. From this route it would not take too much planning to tie it in with the N W Harbour to Port Chalmers trail, again obviating needing to go onto SH1 or 88. It also connects nicely with the University complex. A cycle park could be established in the Station vicinity, with a short walk to the CBD.

Win win I would think. Disadvantages: Frankly I can’t think of any, but I am sure there will be.

[ends]

Add this:

Anonymous
Submitted on 2013/11/17 at 6:04 pm

Normanby to Gardens on existing cycleway, check.
Through Botanic Gardens on new cyclepath – DCC initiative.
Exit at Leith St, connect to new cyclepath through University – Otago Uni initiative.
Exit at Albany St, proceed to Anzac Ave on existing cycle lane.
Connect through Railway Station to existing cycle lane.
Arrive adjacent to Oval in mint condition.

****

NZTA/DCC Dunedin Separated Cycle Lane Proposal

Public consultation on two preferred cycle lane options ends at 5pm on Friday, 6 December.

To access an online survey form or for more information on the separated cycle lane options, visit http://www.nzta.govt.nz/dunedincyclesafe, or email your comments to dunedinshcyclelanes @ nzta.govt.nz. Alternatively, ring 03 477 4000 for an information pack, or post your comments to:

Cycle Lane Feedback, C/o NZ Transport Agency, PO Box 5245, Moray Place, Dunedin 9058

People are welcome to attend the remaining drop-in sessions:
● Held. [12 noon – 2pm, Thursday 14 November, Wall Street Mall]
● 3pm – 6pm, Tuesday 19 November, Otago Settlers Museum
● 12 noon – 2pm, Wednesday 20 November, The Link (University of Otago)

Related Posts and Comments:
17.11.13 Cull and MacTavish… “Have you fixed the debt crisis?”
14.11.13 Cycle lane explosions and puncture kits (SPOKES grenades launch)
8.11.13 Dunedin Separated Cycle Lane Proposal [how to make a submission]
5.11.12 DCC, NZTA: Cycle lanes controversy
19.10.13 Cycle lobby games and media tilts
24.9.13 Mediocrity and lack of critical awareness at DCC [council reports]
8.7.13 Bloody $tupid cycleways and Cull’s electioneering . . . [route maps]
28.3.13 DCC DAP 2013/14: Portobello Harington Point Road Improvements
26.2.13 DCC binge spending alert: Proposed South Dunedin cycle network
22.2.13 DCC: Council meeting agenda and reports for 25 February 2013
31.1.13 Who? 2010 electioneering
21.11.12 Safe cycling -Cr Fliss Butcher

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architecture + Women • New Zealand

Architecture + Women NZ screenshot 1

The following information is reproduced in the public interest.

Architectural Theory Review, 17:2-3, 280-298

LIMITED VISIBILITY – Portraits of Women Architects
By Sarah Treadwell & Nicole Allan

Version of record first published: 08 Feb 2013

This paper considers the visibility of women architects across three New Zealand sites: the institutional architecture journal, the national architecture award system and a local website that allows for self-representation. The website, Architecture + Women, was set up in 2011 in anticipation of an exhibition of the work of New Zealand women architects planned for 2013 as an anniversary of an earlier event, ‘‘Constructive Agenda’’, held in 1993. The website accumulates images of women in New Zealand who identify as architects. The paper considers the portrayal of women architects in each of the three sites, juxtaposing a sociological viewpoint with the biographical, seen as distinct yet overlapping modes of representation. Five portraits from the website are selected for detailed discussion as they reflect upon representations of femininity, colonial encounters, nature and the limits of the discipline—issues that are persistent for women architects in New Zealand.

ArchitecturalTheoryReview – Limited Visibility (PDF, 721 KB)

To cite this article:
Sarah Treadwell & Nicole Allan (2012): Limited Visibility: Portraits of Women Architects, Architectural Theory Review, 17:2-3, 280-298

Architectural Theory Review, founded at the University of Sydney in 1996, and now in its eighteenth year, is the pre-eminent journal of architectural theory in the Australasian region. Now published by Taylor and Francis in print and online, the journal is an international forum for generating, exchanging and reflecting on theory in and of architecture. All texts are subject to a rigorous process of blind peer review.

****

Sarah Treadwell is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning (National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries), University of Auckland. Sarah’s research investigates the representation of architecture in colonial and contemporary images. Motels, gender and volcanic conditions of ground are also subjects of interest. Sarah has published in various books and journals including Architectural Theory Review, Architectural Design, Space and Culture, and Interstices. Her book Revisiting Rangiatea was the outcome of participation in the Gordon H Brown Lecture Series in 2008. Professional association: NZIA

Nicole Allan is an Architectural Graduate Practicing. Nicole works in the Christchurch Studio of Warren and Mahoney architects.

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Call for campaign on exports

The Chamber of Commerce says while exporting continues to be concentrated on commodity agriculture, New Zealand has many innovative and creative businesses with the potential to be successful global players.

### idealog.co.nz Friday 11 Nov 2011 at 9:29 am
Leadership
Call for government-business partnership to campaign on exports
By Idealog
The Chamber of Commerce is calling for the incoming government to rethink its approach to exports, joining forces with the private sector to campaign to sell more to the rest of the world. Spokesman Michael Barnett said the traditional focus of increasing exports of conventional merchandise goods needed to shift up the value chain to high-tech, knowledge-based products, the export of services and the returns from outward direct overseas investment. “We believe the best way to improve New Zealand’s export performance is for the incoming government to establish an innovation-focused government-business partnership tasked to lead a campaign to sell more to the world.”
Read more



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Paul Orders for change!

### D Scene 9-11-11 (page 3)
Dunedin Council is under improvement
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council’s new chief executive has launched a comprehensive analysis and change process for the organisation. Paul Orders said an improvement and innovation programme would take a detailed look at the performance and costs of each department. Orders had allowed up to two years for the project with changes happening throughout that period.
{continues} #bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Related Post:
17.9.11 Paul Orders starts Monday

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Barlow Justice Valuers / New Zealand Historic Places Trust—Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012

Background and purpose
Dunedin’s unique look and feel is, in part, defined by its large number of historic and heritage buildings. Heritage interiors are a very important, but sometimes overlooked, part of Dunedin heritage. Ensuring restorations and adaptations of heritage building interiors respect and re-use existing heritage features and fabric is an important part of ensuring their future survival.

Barlow Justice Valuers and the NZ Historic Places Trust wish to recognise and highlight the achievements of building owners who have undertaken sympathetic restoration and refurbishment to interiors of Dunedin’s older buildings. The Dunedin Heritage Interiors Award recognises successful, and appropriately sympathetic interior restoration or upgrade projects.

The Award is administered by the DCC and may be given annually to building owners or developers who have, in the opinion of the judging panel, undertaken the most innovative and sympathetic heritage building interior upgrade and/or refurbishment project in the city.

General Information
Individuals or organisations may nominate their own or others’ buildings for consideration. Projects should reflect a commitment to the retention and re-use of interior features and building fabric. Eligible projects will have had work completed in the 12-month period to 1 December 2011.

The Award consists of a certificate and a cash prize of $1500,
which is awarded to the property owner. A certificate will also
be awarded to the interior designer/s.

Download Award information here:
Barlow Justice – NZHPT Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012 (PDF, 493 KB)

Barlow Justice Valuers
New Zealand Historic Places Trust

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Idealog: R&D and innovation

“Kids are missing out in New Zealand because there’s no connect between the education system and a vision for where we’re going to grow our economy.” -Sir Paul Callaghan

### idealog.co.nz 18 October 2011 at 3:36 pm
Let’s end the flip-flopping on R&D
By Sarah Robson
What do Rakon, Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Tait Electronics, Gallagher Group and Weta Digital have in common? Aside from being successful and enjoying a high profile in business, they’re also the benefactors of the government’s first round of technology development grants, announced late last year. (A second round was awarded in August, with recipients including accounting startup darling Xero.) National pulled no punches in scrapping the Labour government’s all-encompassing R&D tax credit in favour of a targeted, grant-based approach. It’s not a given – businesses have to apply for a slice of the funding pie along with every other man and his dog, and there are no guarantees. But it’s time for government to stop flip-flopping on the issue. Cuts to government spending aren’t going to lift New Zealand out of the economic doldrums. Investment in R&D just might.

Prominent scientist and New Zealander of the Year Sir Paul Callaghan believes New Zealand needs to diversify its economy if its goal is to expand GDP per capita, and start selling ‘brain content’. That means you’re selling products where the manufacturing costs aren’t the main costs of the products – it’s the R&D content.

Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
24.9.11 Idealog: Paul Callaghan’s business plan for New Zealand
21.9.11 John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities
23.6.11 Kathryn Ryan interviews agribusiness pioneer George Harrison
22.5.11 Audacious idea: New Zealand X-Prize Environmental and Energy

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Kathryn Ryan interviews agribusiness pioneer George Harrison

BRILLIANT INTERVIEW (if Ryan didn’t interrupt)

### rnz.co.nz Wed 22 Jun 2011 10:06 AM
Nine To Noon with Kathryn Ryan
Agribusiness pioneer Sir Graeme Harrison
Newly-knighted founder and chair of meat company Anzco Foods, which has annual sales of more than $1.2 billion, making it one of New Zealand’s largest exporters. He is also a director of dairy co-operative Westland Milk Products and fishing firm Sealord.
Audio Ogg Vorbis MP3 (32′50″)

****

Related:

[comment] 25.5.11
Prof Sir Paul Callaghan, physicist, entrepreneur, and New Zealander of the Year, was in Dunedin yesterday. Link

Sir Paul’s vision for New Zealand is a knowledge-based economy producing high-quality exports that do not strain the environment. Looking after the environment created the kind of society in which highly skilled people wanted to live. It helped reverse the brain drain, and attracted people from overseas. -Otago Daily Times

[post] 22.5.11
Audacious idea: New Zealand X-Prize Environmental and Energy

Hyperfactory founder Derek Handley said $1b is less than a tenth of what the current government has committed to infrastructure projects in the next few years and about the same amount spent bailing out South Canterbury Finance investors. It is also “about twice as much as the amount we hope to lose by hosting the Rugby World Cup”, he said and about the same as our bill for six weeks of imported oil. -Sunday Star Times

[post] 2.4.11
At last, PRODUCTIVITY is?

The Productivity Commission’s inquiry into international freight transport services is of high importance to Otago and Southland, Otago Chamber of Commerce chief executive John Christie said yesterday. -Otago Daily Times

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Left hand, right hand…

The climate change adaptation project plan, to be implemented over three years at a cost of $67,500 a year, was approved at a finance, strategy and development committee meeting in late November.

### ODT Online Wed, 5 Jan 2011
DCC plans for climate change
By David Loughrey
The Dunedin City Council is set to spend the next three years developing a wide-ranging response to the problem of climate change, after some alarming warnings about what the future holds. The response will include a major study on the future of South Dunedin, and four other ”hot spots” identified as the most vulnerable areas of the city.
Read more

****

”There are a lot of good reasons why we could be the open air laboratory that tests the green technologies that could benefit communities everywhere.”

### ODT Online Wed, 5 Jan 2011
Waitati eyed as energy trial zone
By Stu Oldham
Blueskin Bay could be poised to become New Zealand’s first open air new technology energy laboratory, Waitati Energy Project co-ordinator Scott Willis says. National and international companies were interested in a ”community-size trial zone” for their green technologies, Mr Willis said yesterday.
Read more

****

Powerhouse Wind director Bill Currie confirmed company representatives met those of some ”quite big” Indian companies during a Dunedin City Council-supported trip.

### ODT Online Wed, 5 Jan 2011
Future in wind, but cash needed
By Stu Oldham
A Dunedin company is looking for $700,000 to start building wind turbines for burgeoning and potentially lucrative markets overseas.

Powerhouse Wind wants to start low-volume production of its single-blade turbine to supply domestic customers and send demonstration machines overseas.

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Dunedin company iVisit develops free iPhone app

Mobile tourism information service

### ODT Online Wed, 29 Dec 2010
Are phones the new guidebooks?
By Hamish McNeilly
Guidebooks may be a thing of the past, thanks to an innovative Dunedin company which turns smartphones into a mobile tourism information service. Smartphone applications represented the most exciting possibilities for the fast moving tourism industry since the introduction of maps and guidebooks, AA Tourism online general manager Roger Slater said.

At the forefront of this technology was Dunedin company iVisit, which has spent nearly a year creating the smartphone application XplrNZ.

Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
23.12.10 ODT on the “the phoenix of design and innovation”
12.11.10 FREE wireless internet in Dunedin …now that’s wicked!
12.11.10 WIC NZ Ltd announces Innovate 100 programme
11.10.10 The Distiller + WIC — Dunedin entrepreneurs
28.9.10 AugmentedReality @ Dunedin
25.8.10 New hotspot in Anzac Ave, Dunedin

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Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus / Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle

Innovation Incubator
When profits depend on employees’ ability to create cutting-edge designs, a business simply can’t survive unless its workplace is an incubator for innovation: Urban Outfitters “lives and dies in creativity”.
-Richard Hayne, Urban Outfitters

After relocating to an abandoned naval yard, the retro-chic retailer sees revenue skyrocket—and once skeptical employees have embraced the gritty, but inspiring space.

### hq.construction.com 1 December 2009
Urban Outfitters’ Edgy Adventure
By Jenna M. McKnight and Sebastian Howard
PHILADELPHIA—Richard Hayne, chairman and president of Urban Outfitters, met stiff resistance when he initially announced plans to move his company’s headquarters from traditional high-rise offices to five dilapidated buildings in the decommissioned Philadelphia Navy Yard. “I wouldn’t say it was a mutiny,” Hayne says, recalling his colleagues’ reactions. “But there were definitely some blank stares and ‘are you kiddings?’”

The retailing giant, which sold nearly $2 billion worth of its clothing and apartment wares in 2008, for many years had been spread among six buildings in downtown Philadelphia. This physical separation was “horrible,” Hayne says, because each department was “unsure about what the other was doing.”

Increasingly, Hayne realised that to maximise performance his company needed a unified campus—and a generic office park was out of the question given the spirit and reputation of Urban Outfitters.

Founded in 1970, the retailer offers hip merchandise with a vintage twist aimed at trendy, young buyers. Most of its retail brands, which include Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, and Free People, are housed in renovated old buildings with double-height ceilings and exposed brick, concrete and timber.

So Hayne began looking for a setting for his new corporate home that would mirror the aesthetic sensibility of his stores, and in 2004, he found what he judged to be a near-perfect spot: the naval shipyard, which the Defense Department shuttered in 1995.

Amenities such as a gym, yoga studio, dog park, and farmers’ market further add to the lively and informal atmosphere. The exterior landscaping was designed by Julie Bargmann’s D.I.R.T. studio, known for turning derelict industrial sites into vibrant public spaces.

Read more

****

### uli.org [Urban Land Institute]
Awards for Excellence: 2007 Winner
Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Philadelphia Navy Yard, which encompasses more than 1,000 acres (405 ha), 2,000 buildings, and 2.5 miles (4 km) of riverfront, was decommissioned in 1996. In 2000, ownership was transferred to the Philadelphia Authority of Industrial Development (PAID), and the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC) began developing the property on behalf of PAID and the city. The Navy Yard is rapidly becoming a dynamic and viable new business location, as evidenced by the Urban Outfitters corporate office campus, which was completed and opened in October 2006.
Read more

© Lara Swimmer Photography

Urban Outfitters’ pioneering move has positively impacted the entire Navy Yard. A new creative district, with top advertising agencies, graphic designers, and photographers, is growing around the retailer. New coffee shops and restaurants serve workers and visitors alike. More than 4,000 jobs have been created in the Yard since the company moved.
worldarchitecturenews.com (Thursday 29 Oct 2009)

See archdaily.com (1 December 2010) for more photographs by Lara Swimmer.

www.urbanoutfittersinc.com

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Discovering the simple laws of cities

Whenever a city doubles in size, every measure of economic activity, from construction spending to the amount of bank deposits, increases by approximately 15 percent per capita. It doesn’t matter how big the city is; the law remains the same.

West admits that all successful cities are a little uncomfortable. He describes the purpose of urban planning as finding a way to minimize our distress while maximizing our interactions.

Cities are unruly places, largely immune to the desires of politicians and planners. “Think about how powerless a mayor is,” West says. “They can’t tell people where to live or what to do or who to talk to. Cities can’t be managed, and that’s what keeps them so vibrant. They’re just these insane masses of people, bumping into each other and maybe sharing an idea or two. It’s the freedom of the city that keeps it alive.”

### nytimes.com 17 December 2010
A Physicist Solves the City
By Jonah Lehrer
Geoffrey West is a theoretical physicist in search of fundamental laws, he likes to compare his work to that of Kepler, Galileo and Newton. …although West worked for decades as a physicist at Stanford University and Los Alamos National Laboratory, he started thinking about leaving the field after the financing for the Texas superconducting supercollider was cancelled by Congress in 1993. West, however, wasn’t ready to retire, and so he began searching for subjects that needed his skill set. Eventually he settled on cities: the urban jungle looked chaotic — all those taxi horns and traffic jams — but perhaps it might be found to obey a short list of universal rules.

“We spend all this time thinking about cities in terms of their local details, their restaurants and museums and weather,” West says. “I had this hunch that there was something more, that every city was also shaped by a set of hidden laws.”

And so West set out to solve the City.

West saw the metropolis as a sprawling organism, defined by its infrastructure. (The boulevard was like a blood vessel, the back alley a capillary.) This implied that the real purpose of cities, and the reason cities keep on growing, is their ability to create massive economies of scale, just as big animals do.

After analysing the first sets of city data — the physicists began with infrastructure and consumption statistics — they concluded that cities looked a lot like elephants. In city after city, the indicators of urban “metabolism”, like the number of gas stations or the total surface area of roads, showed that when a city doubles in size, it requires an increase in resources of only 85 percent. This straightforward observation has some surprising implications. It suggests, for instance, that modern cities are the real centres of sustainability.
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ODT on the “the phoenix of design and innovation”

### ODT Online Thu, 23 Dec 2010
Editorial: Laudable growth
It is a scandal that Hillside’s engineering workshops are being bypassed for the contract to build 300 flat-bed wagons, work which would have secured its ongoing future as one of the few heavy manufacturing entities left in the country – and certainly in the south. But the success of Fisher and Paykel Appliances’ Dunedin operation, which is expanding its staff numbers, is an example of the ways in which modern flexible businesses can reinvent themselves – in moving from the more traditional practices and technologies into the modern, more service-based support arenas.

Dunedin has a proud history in engineering and has shown – particularly with F&P’s continued success and development – it has the flexibility and labour market to supply technologically advanced adjunct industries.

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### ODT Online Tue, 21 Dec 2010
F&P’s city staff numbers set to rise to 180
By Neal Wallace
Whiteware manufacturer Fisher and Paykel Appliances hopes to increase its Dunedin workforce to about 180 people by the middle of next year as it expands its production design and call centre staffing levels.

F&P remained a major employer in the city, with more than 100 production designers and engineers working on designs for cooking and dishwashing appliances sold around the world.

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WIC NZ Ltd announces Innovate 100 programme

Media Release
Dunedin, New Zealand. 12 November 2010.

Wireless Internet Connections (WIC NZ Ltd) announces Innovate 100 programme.

WIC NZ Ltd formally announced today the availability of its Innovate 100 programme. This initiative is aimed at assisting the growing population of Internet startup companies and creative industries in Dunedin in the process of developing innovative and compelling online content to be delivered to consumers in New Zealand and the rest of the world. WIC NZ pioneered low-cost, fixed-rate commercial and residential connections with no data caps or excess data charges, removing barriers to entry and other disincentives to use amongst the user population.

New and innovative ideas on the Internet take time to evolve and mature and can gain critical mass only through engagement with a wide audience. Where there is a high barrier or cost of entry to providing content, often these ideas do not have time or opportunity to flourish. Innovate 100 is a solution to reduce those barriers and retain creative, innovative thinkers within the Dunedin community.

Innovate 100 provides an online digital content producer with access capacity of up to 100Mbps of outbound Internet traffic. The access points for this service are open to existing and new customers at high-capacity fibre-connected nodes in Dunedin city. Content served via Innovate 100 is peered nationally at all of the neutral Internet exchanges to facilitate rapid access from all consumers regardless of ISP.

Innovate 100 is a step beyond existing service offerings and takes advantage of increased capabilities and under-utilised outbound capacity on our Internet backhaul. We believe that with the advent of Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB), a robust content and hosting ecosystem needs to evolve to meet future demand. Innovate 100 is the first step in stimulating local content providers to experiment with new ideas that will scale up to meet this demand. Stu Fleming, Managing Director and Chief Technical Officer of WIC NZ says: “This is the lowest cost of entry that we can think of to enable Dunedin-based content providers to be able to implement their ideas and get their online content to the world. All you need is a server and a network cable.”

Innovate 100 is available to new and existing WIC NZ customers and associates of The Distiller. “WIC NZ has been a long-time champion for Dunedin’s bootstrapped technology entrepreneurs through its unconditional support of The Distiller since its inception,” says Jason Leong, co-founder of The Distiller and PocketSmith. “Innovate 100 is a clear example of the forward thinking and action that will uplift Dunedin’s profile as a cradle for entrepreneurship, and we’re very excited to be a part this remarkable opportunity. We look forward to partnering with WIC NZ in building the next generation of products and services that will be consumed over the broadband of tomorrow.”

The Innovate 100 programme will operate for 12 months from January 2011. It is available initially at WIC NZ’s hosting centre at Cresswell St, Dunedin and within the Centre for Innovation at St David Street, Dunedin. WIC NZ is a Layer 2 provider with Flute Networks and can extend Innovate 100 at cost to reach any location within the Flute Networks coverage area.

WIC NZ Ltd is a Dunedin-based, privately-owned independent Internet Service provider operating since 2004. For more details regarding these announcements, please contact:

Stu Fleming, Managing Director (WIC NZ Ltd)
Tel: 0508 123 942 or 021 993 125

Wireless Internet Connections
PO Box 13146, Green Island, Dunedin
Email: stewart@wic.co.nz

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FREE wireless internet in Dunedin …now that’s wicked!

Media Release
Dunedin, New Zealand. 12 November 2010.

Wireless Internet Connections (WIC NZ) Ltd launches free wireless access in Dunedin.

WIC NZ Ltd introduces its free wireless service in Dunedin under the Wicked Networks brand. Wicked Networks has been operating since March 1010 and has over 2300 registered users regularly using the network of around 30 Wi-Fi (802.11N) hotspots across the city. The service provides a registration-based, advertising-supported portal with high-capacity access to local services and shared Internet capacity upstream.

Wicked Networks was officially launched by Clare Curran MP at 5:30pm Friday 12 November 1010, at the Centre for Innovation, 87 St David Street, Dunedin.

Wicked Networks provides an easy, low-cost means of access to information and services by locals, business users and visitors alike. The coverage, capacity and user base of the service are all scalable at incremental cost. Wicked Networks has grown at the rate of 100 new users per week and delivers around 150GB of monthly traffic.

The Wicked Networks infrastructure provides an open-access platform to support services operated by multiple service providers. WIC NZ maintains robust interconnect arrangements with other local operators for high-capacity data exchange at low cost.

Wicked Networks is used by Otago Polytechnic to extend the range and coverage of their campus wireless network across the city. Wicked Networks is used to support the delivery of augmented reality content in a novel project supported by the Dunedin City Council lndustry Project Fund. Wicked Networks welcomes and encourages other operators to adopt the service and willingly engages with any third-party provider wishing to operate differentiated services on the open-access platform.

Wicked Networks addresses many issues that are commonly encountered for free wi-fi:
• securing the customer relationship via e-mail and text verification systems
• robust traffic management to reduce or eliminate unacceptable usage
• support for “access with payment” voucher codes at designated locations
• ability to cooperate with existing wireless providers.

The key to the success of this platform is the inclusiveness provided by the cooperative interconnect arrangements with other providers. Any service provider can broadcast their wireless service identifier (SSID) over the common infrastructure and have their traffic delivered at a designated exchange point. Usage of the Otago Polytechnic campus wireless service has more than doubled since the introduction of the additional coverage on Wicked Networks. The open access component was designed to stimulate innovation and we are delighted to see this happening already.

The costs of the Wicked Networks service are met by advertising revenue on the login and registration portal pages that appear in a Web browser, and from the interconnect arrangements with third-party providers.

For more information about Wicked Networks, please direct all enquiries to:

Stu Fleming
Managing Director, WIC NZ Ltd

Wicked Networks PO Box 13146, Green Island, Dunedin
Freecall: 0508 942 533 or 0508 WICKED
Email: info@wickednetworks.co.nz
www.wickednetworks.co.nz

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Connecting business and science sectors

### ODT Online Thu, 21 Oct 2010
Varsity part of $20m research scheme
The University of Otago is one of first six research institutions to be included in the Government’s new technology transfer voucher scheme. Research, Science and Technology Minister Wayne Mapp yesterday announced the initial list of six research institutions from which businesses participating in the scheme could choose. The “vouchers” will be awarded on application to businesses with a specific research and development project, but little or no in-house research and development capability.

The voucher scheme would enhance the connection between the business and science sectors, which would lead to innovation and business growth, which benefited all New Zealanders.

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Dunedin Heritage Reuse Design Competition

Download poster (PDF): Dunedin Heritage Reuse Design Competition

Further information (PDF): HeritageReuseDesignCompetition UPDATED

DCC Media Release
For the 2010-2011 Design Competition, the nominated building is Garrison Hall, Dowling Street, Dunedin. Entries need to balance creative design, economic viability and sensitivity to heritage features and values.

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Monorail #NZ.idea

### nbr.co.nz Saturday September 25, 2010 – 05:00am
NZ monorail start-up gets $US1million from Google
By NBR staff
Google has recognised Auckland monorail start-up Shweeb, making it one of five companies worldwide to be awarded $US1 million in its $US10 million 10^100 competition.

In return for its $US1 million injection, Google has taken a 25% stake in Shweeb, with the proviso that any profits made by the internet company will go to a charitable trust for the betterment of public transport.

Shweeb, founded in 2006, is run by Remuera managing director Peter Cossey and Rotorua inventor Geoff Barnett. Its human-powered monorail concept sees a Futurama-style capsule combined with reclining cycle technology.
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Schweeb Monorail Technology

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www.project10tothe100.com

Project 10^100 by Google is a call for ideas to change the world by helping as many people as possible.

Thousands of people from more than 170 countries submitted over 150,000 ideas. From that group, Google narrowed it to the final 16 ideas for public vote.

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Why didn’t Populous tell Farry about this sooner *sigh*

/via @nzherald

### nzherald.co.nz 4:11 PM Saturday Jun 19, 2010
Olympic future is ‘stadium in a box’
The spectacular and expensive Water Cube and Bird’s Nest stadiums were focal points of the Beijing games, but the future of Olympic architecture may well be found in a box. Australian architect John Barrow, whose firm Populous is working on the London 2012 Olympic Games infrastructure, says a move towards sustainable games architecture could see the introduction of the “stadium in a box”. His idea is to design and construct something affordable, modular, lightweight and flexible, which can be modified and transported from host city to host city. AAP
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Leading the world “out of the Age of Stupid”

The writer of the following article, businessman Phillip Mills, is high on philosophy – yet he underpins his advocacy nicely with reference to New Zealand companies working the green wave.

After reading it, believing it (What if? contributors have been pitching green sentiments semi-regularly), ask why New Zealand television (mass) media aren’t providing more in-depth reporting and educative ‘storymaking’ on the subject of this country’s contemporary business efforts.

Country Calendar, the popular high-quality local programme, does for innovative farming and agricultural practice – and community care – what a greater number of documentary-making entities and media programmers should be doing for our wider business community.

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While sports codes, biased to male sport, continue to gain more coverage than Kiwi-can business and entrepreneurship on screen (through free-to-air and pay TV), we have a serious problem in re-imagining ourselves as a competitive community-driven business force, regionally and internationally.

We should know ourselves better, in the everyday sense of aspirational behaviour and business application. Live it learn it lead it, Kiwi women and men.

Mills says, “We led the world on getting the vote for New Zealand women.” Yes, but Kiwi women are seriously sidelined from receiving equal pay, recognition and status in business. Currently, they are badly positioned to assert themselves as ‘equal partners’. Ethically, morally, I hope the green wave, with the application of time, intelligence, voices, persuasion, performance and resources, will be among our finest opportunities to mediate and defuse the staunch gender divide that racks and undermines our New Zealand business culture.

How we mean to thrive as a country involves getting past ‘old school’ management, employment, production and investment models . . . moving a startling distance away from the limited thinking that, by example, the ‘phenomena’ of rugby and stadiums most certainly represent.

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Phillip Mills has a New Year’s wish: that New Zealand surf the “green wave” to the forefront of the world’s new, “clean” economies.

### ODT Online Thu, 21 Jan 2010
Opinion | Energy
NZ: green opportunity knocks
Here we are all of a sudden at the beginning of the second decade of the 21st century. Just yesterday, it seems, we were watching out for any Y2K disruptions while celebrating the new millennium. Now a new set of problems threatens our treasured Kiwi lifestyle and life quality, our values, our prosperity and the long-term viability of our country.

But by riding at the forefront of the green wave, we can have equitable prosperity, quality of life, the ability to live our values and an economy that is viable over the long term.

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-Phillip Mills is executive director of Les Mills International. He received a World Class New Zealand Award for New Thinking in 2009 and was Ernst & Young NZ Entrepreneur of the Year in 2004.

Related post:
1.6.09 RWC 2011: Dropping the ball on sustainability

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Energy Roof Perugia, Italy

Eco Factor: Self-sufficient structure generates solar and wind energy.

### http://www.designboom.com 15 January 2010
Coop Himmelb(l)au Energy Roof in Italy
By ridhika db
Wolf D. Prix, design principal and CEO of Coop Himmelb(l)au presented the design for the ‘Energy Roof’ in Perugia, Italy, today.

Energy Roof is part of a research project for the University of Perugia called, “Walking through the history”. The roof serves as canopy along Via Mazzini in the centre of Perugia and at the same time creates the entry point to the archaeological underground passage leading through the history of Perugia.

The architect developed the design of the roof with the goal to generate energy for the city. While the orientation of the west wing is optimised in relation to solar radiation, the east wing captures wind. The roof consists of three layers: the energy generating top layer, the structural layer in the middle and a layer on the bottom as a combination of laminated glazing and translucent pneumatic cushions.

The top layer includes transparent photovoltaic cells to generate electricity and shade the sun. The orientation of the individual cells is generated and optimised by a computer-driven scripting programme. Furthermore five wind turbines placed inside the structural layer are generating additional energy. Both the roof and the underground passage are energy self-sufficient.
Link plus photos

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The new paradigmatic design of the Energy Roof creates a distinctive and highly recognisable icon for the city and a statement for aesthetic sustainability corresponding with the ancient buildings of Via Mazzini. -David K.
Read more at plusmood.com

So, we’re not getting a high-tech eco roof at Dunedin’s stadium?

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Superficial Dunedin sloganism

NO SLOGAN REQUIRED

We see ODT is voicing its campaign using the word “brand”, despite taking the front page today to push slogans mostly. Hmmph.

The slogan search was a bit of fun but comes at the cost of exposing the negative self-deprecatory ‘irishness’ of the place.

More than that, helpfully, it shows some of the wider demographics of people’s exposure to what Dunedin might seem like during a dull, chilly summer, or what their memories are of the city having the hit the wider world in adulthood. Some childishness enters the fray of sloganism.

Users of the internet demonstrate how widely the debate is cast, and how lively the medium is for brainstorming, discussion and famous last words – in which Dunedin comes to resemble hapless prey, underscored by truths, comparisons and denials of sorts.

One thing is clear from the battery charge of slogans online, in particular (!!!!), Dunedin is sufficiently well regarded as ‘being’ its own place – otherwise, it would have attracted little or no comment at all.

Dunedin always has something to do with learning, leaving and the test of arriving with little known, until you get past the glint in its eye.

Cloyingly, in business it appears to have lots to do with OBHS. There’s room to explore the city’s identity through other mirrors and charms, make that soon, make that comprehensive.

For these days in the news we’re saying we’re debt funded here to an unholy degree. We are for this matter on watch to emerge, we hope, without deep scars, parochial chips on shoulders – divorced from our good side.

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### ODT Online Thu, 14 Jan 2010
City brand search hots up
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s plan to develop and launch a new brand for the city has sparked a strong city-wide response, and the search is now on to find the “essence” of the Dunedin experience to promote the city to the rest of the world.
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