Tag Archives: Transportation

Stupid ORC Bus Hub : DCC notifies requirement for designation #Dunedin

Proposed ORC Bus Hub, Great King St – concept image [supplied]

CALL FOR PUBLIC SUBMISSIONS

DIS-2017-1 – Central City Bus Hub
Open for submissions. Closes 5pm 18 August 2017

Public notice of requirement for a designation
Sections 168 and 169 of the Resource Management Act 1991

The Dunedin City Council has received notice of a requirement for a new designation from the Otago Regional Council.

Notice of Requirement No: DIS-2017-1

The requirement is for: A Central City Bus Hub for Dunedin’s transport network, and includes all buildings, structures and associated facilities and activities for the carrying out of the public transport system by the Otago Regional Council. With the exception of no public parking, the designation will not prevent the use of Great King Street, between Moray Place and St Andrew Street, being used as a public road.

The designation is to provide for the establishment, operation, maintenance and upgrading of the Central City Bus Hub for Dunedin public transport service purposes and will provide public transport services described in the Otago Regional Council’s Public Transport Plan, and to provide for any site works, buildings or structures, integral and ancillary to the Dunedin public transport system, including but not limited to: Bus shelters and seating; timetable and information displays; bus stops; public amenities, including toilets; landscaping including structures; pedestrian footpaths and accessways; drainage; technology; lighting; security; vehicle priority; signage; passenger comfort initiatives and facilities; passenger information facilities; and all other structures and facilities associated with, or incidental to, a comprehensive facility for the performances of functions of the Central City Bus Hub and support of the Dunedin Public Transport Network for the Otago Regional Council.

The nature of the functions is that these activities will initially occur from approximately 05:30am to 12:30am, 7 days a week, year-round.

The sites to which the requirement applies are as follows:
● Great King Street Road Reserve, between Moray Place and St Andrew Street, Dunedin;
● Moray Place Road Reserve (part of);
● 12.4m² (approx.) within 157 St Andrew Street, legally described as Lot 1 DP 486801;
● Two areas within the Countdown car park adjoining Great King Street – one comprising 58.8m² and the second comprising 50.4m² (approx.) legally described as Lots 2 and 3, DP 6552 and Section 29, Town of Dunedin.
● 19.5m² (approx.) within the Countdown car park adjoining Moray Place, legally described as part Sections 27 and 28, Block XVI, Town Survey District;
● 63m² (approx.) within the Community House car park at 301 Moray Place, legally described as part Town Section 26, Block XVI, Town of Dunedin; and
● 60.8m² (approx.) within the Wilsons car park at 30-36 Great King Street, legally described as Lot 2 DP 338932.

The Notice of Requirement, plans showing the extent of the requirement, and the assessment of environmental effects may be inspected at the following locations:
● City Planning Enquiries, Customer Services Centre, Ground Floor, Civic Centre, 50 The Octagon, Dunedin
● The Dunedin Central Public Library
● The Mosgiel Service Centre
Online

Please contact Paul Freeland on 477 4000 if you have any questions about the Notice of Requirement.

█ Go to this DCC webpage for all the information pertaining to the Notice of Requirement (NoR):
DIS-2017-1 – Central City Bus Hub
Closing date for submissions: Friday 18 August 2017 at 5pm.
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/district-plan/district-plan-changes/dis-2017-1-central-city-bus-hub

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█ Supplementary Reading
From the ‘RMA Quality Planning Resource’ (NZ):

Notices of requirement and requiring authorities

To begin the process of designating land, a requiring authority must serve a notice of requirement on the relevant territorial authority (s168 of the RMA) or lodge it with the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) (s145(3)).  A notice of requirement is a proposal for a designation. 

The notice of requirement has an interim effect, in that it protects the land for the designated purpose until the designation is confirmed and included in an operative district plan (s178).  If the designation is confirmed it overrides the provisions of the district plan so the project or the works may be implemented by the requiring authority in accordance with that designation and any conditions attached to it.  However, the underlying plan provisions continue to apply if the land is used for a purpose other than the designated purpose.

When processing a notice of requirement Part 8 of the RMA requires the territorial authority to consider the requirement and any submissions received (if the requirement was notified), and then make a recommendation to the requiring authority. The territorial authority is only able to make a recommendation to the requiring authority and the requiring authority has the final decision on the matter. Refer to the flowchart for steps in the new designation process.

An alternative process is available under Part 6AA of the RMA for notices of requirement that are for proposals of national significance. Sections 198A – 198M of the RMA also provide for the direct referral of notices of requirement to the Environment Court for a decision.  The direct referral provisions under the RMA allow for requiring authorities to request that notified notices of requirement be directly referred to the Environment Court for a decision, instead of a recommendation by a territorial authority and a decision by a requiring authority.

The designation provides for the long-term ‘approval’ of the work. Because details of the work may not be known at the time of lodging the notice of requirement, s176A provides for further detail or subsequent changes and updates to the work through an outline plan. An outline plan is required to be submitted to the territorial authority, showing details of the work or project to be constructed on the designated land.

As for the notice of requirement process, the territorial authority only has a recommendation role for outline plans. The territorial authority is only able to request changes of the requiring authority and cannot turn down an outline plan. 

A notice of requirement and an outline plan describing the works proposed can be served/submitted at the same time. This approach can be helpful to allow the territorial authority to understand the designation, and can speed up the overall process allowing works to begin sooner. Alternatively, the requirement for an outline plan can be waived by the territorial authority if sufficient information was submitted with the notice of requirement.

Read more: http://www.qualityplanning.org.nz/index.php/plan-development-components/designations/overview/notices-of-requirements

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All we want is …. [possibly?]

No highly coloured tarseal or paving materials not in keeping with Dunedin’s built environment.

NO Bus Hub in Great King St.

And….
smaller more frequent shuttle buses, suburban areas properly serviced with well-spaced bus stops and shelters, easy transfer cards, on-board EFTPOS card top-ups ($5 minimum), digital readouts for next bus at all stops, wifi buses, direct pick-up drop-off in George and Princes streets, well serviced peak hours and school runs, bus inspectors, highly trained drivers, mechanically well serviced buses, plenty of mobility access for all comers.

Or to just call an affordable version of Uber or Lyft.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

[whatifdunedin]

2 Comments

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#OldHat Dunedin bus system hard to use and unaffordable

Lynley Hood is a positive advocate for her area, no doubt – but hopefully she can think more widely than Corstorphine, to the provision of fair and equitable public transport for The Many, wherever they live in Dunedin, who struggle to pay standard fares or top up the ‘dumb’ Go Card —or who have no bus service to their streets at decent intervals with timely transfer options for necessary travel destinations [the currently ‘immovable’ ORC system].

Or thank god, there’s hail apps.

[Is Otago Regional Council up with the technology about to change public transport @ New Zealand —thereby cancelling any profit from the ill-thought diesel-breathing bus hub planned for Great King St in Central Dunedin.]

Black car service [uberinternal.com]

When a new flexible bus ticketing system is introduced early next year in Dunedin and the Queenstown area, consideration would be given to introducing a lower $5 top-up for Go Cards for online payments. –ORC

### ODT Online Tue, 6 Jun 2017
Bus discounts asked of ORC
By John Gibb
Kew resident Lynley Hood is urging the Otago Regional Council to introduce a community services card bus discount to help “transport disadvantaged” people in Dunedin. “Public transport is important for all sorts of reasons, certainly for inclusiveness and giving everybody a chance,” Dr Hood said. If you’re going to proceed with education and get a job, you’ve got to have transport. It’s got to be attractive to everybody, so it works for the people who need it.” She often saw bus users checking their small change to see if they could afford to use the bus, and clearly not everyone could. She has been suggesting this extension of the bus discount system, and other improvements in the Corstorphine bus service, for several years, and made a detailed submission to the council in 2014. More Corstorphine residents would be encouraged to switch to Go Cards by providing the suggested discount for community services card holders, and cutting the minimum Go Card top-up payment from $10 to $5, she said.
Read more

Radiohead Published on Jun 2, 2017
Radiohead – I Promise
I Promise is one of 3 previously unreleased tracks from the album OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997 – 2017.

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“Transportation companies compete for customers, and ultimately it is the consumer who makes the choice.” –Chicago’s Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection

“Were the old deemed to have a constitutional right to preclude the entry of the new into the markets of the old, economic progress might grind to a halt,” Judge Richard Posner wrote in the 7th Circuit decision. “Instead of taxis we might have horse and buggies; instead of the telephone, the telegraph; instead of computers, slide rules.”

### usatoday.com 4:47 p.m. ET 5 Jun 2017 | Updated
Chicago cabbies say industry is teetering toward collapse
By Aamer Madhani
CHICAGO — Operators of the nation’s second-biggest taxi fleet are now accelerating toward their long-rumoured extinction, edging towards becoming virtual dinosaurs in the era of ride-sharing monsters Uber and Lyft. Cabbies have long grumbled that the sky is falling as they lose ground to ride-sharing companies. Now, cabbies in Chicago are pointing to new data that suggests the decline could be speeding up. About 42% of Chicago’s taxi fleet was not operating in the month of March, and cabbies have seen their revenue slide for their long-beleaguered industry by nearly 40% over the last three years as riders are increasingly ditching cabs for ride-hailing apps Uber, Lyft and Via, according to a study released Monday by the Chicago cab drivers union. More than 2,900 of Chicago’s nearly 7,000 licensed taxis were inactive in March 2017 — meaning they had not picked up a fare in a month, according to the Cab Drivers United/AFSCME Local 2500 report. The average monthly income per active medallion — the permit that gives cabbies the exclusive right to pick up passengers who hail them on the street — has dipped from $5,276 in January 2014 to $3,206 this year. The number of riders in Chicago hailing cabs has also plummeted during that same period from 2.3 million monthly riders to about 1.1 million. Declining ridership for Chicago’s taxi industry comes as foreclosures are piling up for taxi medallion owners who aren’t generating enough fares to keep up with their loan payments and meet their expenses.
….Chicago cabbies aren’t alone in feeling the pinch. In New York, ridership in the city’s iconic yellow cabs has fallen about 30% over the last three years. Last year, San Francisco’s Yellow Cab — the city’s largest taxi company — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Los Angeles taxi ridership fell 43%, and revenue was down 24%, between 2013 and 2016.
Read more

Medallion Report (FINAL)

[watch video] Fox 32 : Chicago taxi drivers: Industry is teetering toward collapse
Posted: Jun 05 2017 09:50PM CDT | Updated

New York, the new normal….

Motherboard Published on May 27, 2016
Is Uber Killing the Yellow Taxi in New York City?
As Uber’s stranglehold over the taxi industry increases, some New York yellow cab dispatchers have found themselves in an unprecedented predicament: sitting on millions of dollars worth of medallion yellow cabs, but not enough drivers to drive them.

█ Wikipedia: Taxicab regulation

Related Post and Cimments
8.12.16 Our loss-making public bus system, as for the colours *spew
20.11.16 Dunedin Buses – Route planners don’t consider effects on local business
11.8.16 Tesla Motors to open new location every four days #electrictravel
21.3.16 Uber travel

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

10 Comments

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Good Old Boy pushes waterfront stadium for Auckland *yawn

At Twitter:

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### NZ Herald 5:00 AM Sunday Apr 30, 2017
Stunning stadium pitched for Auckland, sunken into waterfront
By Simon Plumb
Jaw-dropping concepts for an iconic new national stadium have been pitched to Auckland Council, proposing a state-of-the-art arena be submerged into the city’s waterfront. A portfolio of spectacular designs can be revealed from documents delivered to the office of Auckland Mayor Phil Goff last month. The Herald on Sunday has obtained them through the Local Government Official Information and Meeting Act [LGOIMA]. Dubbed The Crater, the idea centres on a subterranean multi-events venue, inverting conventional design by building below ground rather than above. Created by Auckland design and marketing figure Phil O’Reilly, three potentials factor in a core concept of a sunken bowl-type arena, as well as renderings of a roofed version. A third concept incorporates new cruise ship terminals that would flank the facility, although O’Reilly said the general idea could also work inland if the waterfront was dumped as a location. […] O’Reilly said as far as he is aware, the submerged venue would be the first of its kind anywhere in the world and was a chance for Auckland to build an iconic landmark that would be recognised the world over – but in keeping with Auckland’s natural volcanic landscape. […] Although not as large in scale, likely between 30,000-50,000 capacity, O’Reilly said a truly cutting-edge design could see the Kiwi venue punch way above its weight and become as recognised as some of the most famous on Earth.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

27 Comments

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Electric fleet vehicles NZ #cleanenergy

renault_kangoo_ze-cleantechnica-comRenault Kangoo ZE Van [cleantechnica.com]

### NZ Herald Thu, 19 Jan 2017
Electric vehicles get $3.5m boost
The Government has agreed to pay $3.5 million towards electric vehicle projects around the country to promote the greener form of transport. Energy and Resources Minister Judith Collins announced today that 15 projects would be conditionally funded, as the Government seeks to meet its target of 64,000 electric vehicles on New Zealand’s roads by 2021. The projects include Foodstuffs using 28 all-electric delivery vans at its supermarkets; supporting Tranzit Group and Auckland Transport introducting electric buses and charging infrastructure; and Waste Management NZ converting three rubbish trucks to run on electricity.
Read more

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Foodstuffs (NZ)
Media Release

Fri, 20 Jan 2017

Minister of Energy and Resources Judith Collins announces New World and PAK’nSAVE electric delivery van trial
The Honourable Judith Collins has today announced that the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) will be providing funding to support Foodstuffs trial of electric delivery vans across its New World and PAK’nSAVE supermarkets in 2017.
“This is the first time a commercial electric vehicle fleet of this size has been trialled in New Zealand,” says Chris Quin, CEO, Foodstuffs North Island Ltd. “The funding will go towards the implementation of 28 zero emission electric delivery vans at New World and PAK’nSAVE stores across the North and South Island.”
According to Quin when the project was put to the business initial interest from stores was incredibly positive. “Our owners recognise and support Foodstuffs’ commitment to be more sustainable and at the leading edge of new technology. Our business practices are continually evolving to be more sustainable, this is demonstrated through our work on recyclable packaging, food donation, natural refrigeration systems and energy efficiency and ensures the business will be well placed over the coming years.”
Quin adds, “It fits in perfectly with Foodstuffs drive to reduce environmental impacts and support brand NZ. Electric vehicles offer the potential to both reduce the business’ dependence on imported fuels whilst at the same time reducing road based transport emissions by 100%.”
“Add to this the fact the electricity powering the vehicles is 100% locally generated and over 80% renewably generated through hydro, wind and geothermal sources – meaning we are investing in both New Zealand‘s economy and its environment.”
The Nissan e-NV 200 delivery vans will be imported over the next year from Europe where they are manufactured. Once charged they are capable of travelling up to 150 kilometres at a time without generating either noise or emissions.
Foodstuffs is in discussion with EECA about the potential installation of separate public electric vehicle charging points at key New World and PAK’nSAVE store locations throughout the country.
“The idea is that the provision of easily accessible charging facilities will encourage the public to gradually transition away from petrol and diesel cars to sustainable electric vehicles. You will be able to charge your car whilst grabbing your groceries,” says Quin.
Foodstuffs Link

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### ODT Online Mon, 30 Jan 2017
Benefits of electric delivery vehicle adding up
By Dene Mackenzie
For Mark Dickson, the future is already here following the purchase of an electric delivery vehicle for his Taste Nature business in Dunedin. Mr Dickson and his wife and business partner, Rayna Dickson, had talked about an electric vehicle two years ago as part of an extension to their organic food business. When the couple realised they needed a newer vehicle, the electric delivery van  seemed a natural extension to the business, Mr Dickson said. A month ago, he and Mrs Dickson bought a Nissan e-NV200 delivery vehicle, the same kind as grocery chain Foodstuffs and other businesses recently received government funding for in order to trial the vehicles.
Read more

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### ecotricity.co.nz Sat, 30 Apr 2016
Electric Buses and Driverless Shuttles are about to solve Auckland’s Traffic Woes
By Al Yates
The recent announcement of the electrification of the NZ Bus fleet is a massive boost for completing the electrification of New Zealands public transport fleet. But it goes well beyond buses as it also proves that transport electrification is now economic across a growing number of sectors. In this article we discuss two key components of how Auckland’s traffic woes are about to be alleviated in the short to medium term with the stroke of two technological changes, Electrification of the Bus Fleet, and Driverless Shuttles.
Read more

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Good news for Cerebos Greggs and business development in Central Otago …….DCC stands divorced

Channel 39 Published on Nov 16, 2016
$20 million upgrade for historic Dunedin coffee factory
An historic Dunedin based coffee producer has received a multimillion-dollar overhaul. The Gregg’s coffee roasting facility has redeveloped its production line to meet growing demand for the caffeinated drink.

cerebos-greggs-building-plaque-16-11-16[screenshot ODTV]

### ODT Online Thu, 17 Nov 2016
Gregg’s spends $20m on Dunedin plant
By David Loughrey
Cerebos Gregg’s yesterday celebrated the completion of a $20 million investment in its Dunedin plant in Forth St. The investment over the past two and a-half years has paid for manufacturing upgrades including new production lines, a warehouse extension, improvements to environmental compliance, a new staff car park, staff facilities and an open plan main office. Australian-based chief executive Terry Svenson said the investment in the plant that supplied coffee throughout New Zealand meant production would continue on the site where coffee had been made since 1869. The factory produces coffee for brands including Gregg’s, Robert Harris, Orb, Civo and Bruno Rossi.
Read more

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### ODT Online Wed, 16 Nov 2016
$14.7m for space centre
By Jono Edwards
An Alexandra satellite research centre could be operational by the middle of next year. There was elation in Central Otago yesterday as Minister for Science and Innovation Steven Joyce announced a grant of up to $14.7million over four years for the Centre for Space Science Technology (CSST). Central Otago Mayor Tim Cadogan called the announcement a “game-changer” for Alexandra and Central Otago, and said the centre, which would boost Alexandra’s economy by an estimated $2.8million to $3.6million a year in its first three years, was “up next to the gold rush”.
Read more

### ODT Online Thu, 17 Nov 2016
Innovation hub in Alex possible
By Jono Edwards
An Alexandra “innovation hub” hosting science entrepreneurs could be one of the spinoffs of a space-based research centre in the town. This week, Minister for Science and Innovation Steven Joyce announced a grant of up to $14.7million over four years for the Centre for Space Science Technology. Central Otago District Council economic development manager Warwick Hawker said that from the early days of the project, there had been discussions about creating an “innovation hub” in the town as an offshoot.
Read more

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The ODT editorial congratulates “Alexandra and its commitment to secure a scientific future for Central Otago”. —And YAY(!), it swats Dunedin City Council as it should be SLAMMED.

In turn then, praise to ODT – for speaking out against DCC’s pig ignorant lack of support for local and regional business development, thanks to Mayor Cull and his greenie Councillors.

### ODT Online Thu, 17 Nov 2016
Editorial: Contrasting councils
OPINION A significant amount of government money is being invested in creating the Centre for Space Science Technology which will be based in Alexandra. In total, the Government is spending up to $14.7 million over four years for the new institution with additional funding from industry. It will operate as a private, independently governed organisation. Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce says the centre will undertake research to explore the use of space-based measurements and satellite imagery unique to New Zealand to meet the specific needs of regional industries. Mr Joyce says a standout aspect of the proposal was the centre also having research hubs in Dunedin, Canterbury and Taranaki, further encouraging research and development and innovation in regional New Zealand. […] Contrast the attitude of the nine members of the Dunedin City Council who quickly showed their so-called green credentials on the same day of the Alexandra announcement. Those nine councillors voted to call on the Government to place a moratorium on deep-sea oil and gas exploration and extraction. Only four members of the council understood the implications of the vote. The council is again proving itself to be not business friendly. Sadly, those 11 members do not understand the landscape on exploration has changed.
Read more

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BS / Lunacy extraordinaire or, “You backed Cull, Julian” :

### ODT Online Wed, 16 Nov 2016
Council green as grass on oil exploration issue
By David Loughrey
The latest version of the Dunedin City Council has been quick to show its green credentials. A majority of nine “yes” votes overwhelmed four “no” votes and an abstention when the council voted to call on the Government to place a moratorium on deep-sea oil and gas exploration and extraction. The vote was, in a way, an early test of the collective thinking of the new council after last month’s elections, in which there were allegations of a green “bloc” that voted together at meetings.
Read more

Douglas Field Published on Nov 16, 2016
Green as grass
Dunedin City Council (again) voted to call on the government to place a moratorium on deep sea oil and gas exploration. “Green as Grass” the ODT says. Cabbage heads led by a ‘man o’ straw’ is what I say.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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‘Visual pole-ution’ @Christchurch —says sexy muppet

traffic-lights-at-high-and-tuam-streets-chc-facebook-comTraffic lights going in at High and Tuam Sts [facebook.com]

1NEWS Video

RNZ Checkpoint with John Campbell
Thu, 13 Oct 2016
18 traffic lights fitted out at CHCH intersection Link
A single intersection in the Christchurch CBD has been fitted with 18 traffic lights – bafflying passersby.
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (duration 1′ 29″)

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“Christchurch wants to compete on an international scale well, we haven’t re-built the cathedral but this corner is all sorted.” –Sam Crofskey, C1 Espresso cafe owner

### NZ Herald Online 8:31 AM Thu, 13 Oct 2016
Traffic light madness in central Christchurch
Source: NZ Herald
Eighteen traffic light poles have been set up in one of Christchurch’s quietest intersections, and at least one local says it causes noise to his eyes. The intersection of High and Tuam Streets was traffic-light free before the earthquakes. But for the past 18 months, council contractors have been slowly and steadily erecting traffic light poles in the tightly condensed area.
C1 Espresso cafe owner Sam Crofskey’s business has been on the corner for the past 20 years and is yet to see one crash. The council shouldn’t be surprised that it would get hassled for creating such an eyesore, he said.
“They’ve been doing this one block for 18 months. And we all take the piss about how long this takes, but 18 months? The money that is getting poured into this kind of stuff, oh, I would do a better job [on council].” … “I guess they’re trying to build it for the future. Eighteen sets of traffic lights, and they all do different things: there’s one for people crossing, bicycles, vehicles and trams, so there’s no doubt that someone has thought it out but it might have been a bit early to jump the gun.”
Christchurch City Council could not provide the cost of the traffic poles, nor explain why 18 traffic signals were needed to control the intersection when contacted by Fairfax yesterday.
Read more

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“It’s such a [visually] noisy thing to look at . . . it’s peak traffic management.” –Crofskey

### The Press Online (via Stuff) Last updated 14:13, 13 Oct 2016
‘Overkill’ central Christchurch intersection has 18 lights [+ Video]
By Jack Fletcher and Michael Hayward
A central Christchurch intersection will soon be controlled by 18 traffic light poles, with one local business owner reminded of the busy streets of Tokyo. The lights, at the corner of High and Tuam streets, will guide pedestrian, cycle, vehicle and tram traffic. They were yet to be installed, but locals and urban design experts have criticised the traffic management plans.
Other central city intersections visited on Wednesday have about nine lights.
Read more 

Oldman 5 hours ago:
How the hell will we know where to look?

Fredup 5 hours ago:
Well, it wasn’t City Care. All their bosses are away on holiday in their council $50,000 utes with the boat or caravan behind it.

CHL 5 hours ago:
Must have been designed by the same traffic engineers who built traffic islands and installed calming measures in a quiet residential street in South Dunedin so that fire trucks could not acccess the street and a perfectly good street was turned into a one way street and had a compulsory stop at one end. People with brains but absolutely no common sense.

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RNZ Published on Aug 21, 2016
Christchurch Dilemmas – City Centre – Portland Families
Episode 3 of Christchurch Dilemmas looks at the city centre. This video looks at the Pearl District of Portland – a previously run-down industrial area of the inner city, which has been transformed by putting families first. See all the videos and have your say at http://chchdilemmas.co.nz.

Christchurch Dilemmas is a new series coming soon from Frank Film, the creators of When a City Falls. Funded by NZ On Air and created with assistance from Radio New Zealand, the six-part series examines the major decisions facing Christchurch 5 years on from the earthquakes that devastated the city.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin and the Accessible Journey —it’s hard work! #fixit

An uplifting educational element to election campaign pressures, an event involving the public too – Great going guys!

Channel 39 Published on Oct 4, 2016

### channel39.co.nz Wed, 5 Oct 2016
Mayor hopefuls tackle wheelchair challenge
Disability access is on the minds of some of Dunedin’s mayoral candidates. They’ve been participating in a wheelchair challenge orchestrated by a city council candidate with cerebral palsy. And it’s raised questions about the city’s accessibility.
Ch39 Link

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### ODT Online Thu, 6 Oct 2016
Wheelchair experience enlightening
Dunedin mayoral candidates got to experience life in a wheelchair yesterday, and immediately discovered difficult cambers, bus limitations and the problem of negotiating crowds. Jim O’Malley, Cr Andrew Whiley, Barry Timmings and Abe Gray joined council candidate Joshua Perry on a challenge to take a wheelchair two blocks down George St and back, a mission that proved harder than it sounded. The challenge was organised by Mr Perry, who uses a wheelchair.
Read more

Published by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

4 Comments

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Cycleway planning at #DUD

T R U E ● O R ● F A L S E

bike cartoon by bob lafay [glendalecycles.com]

First we heard there were resignations via ODT.

http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/389654/fourth-high-profile-transport-department-resignation

Although some might be working out notice.

Online identities and job titles suggest people are still at DCC.

Simple. Not updated at LinkedIn possibly.

What’s your point ?!

“THE SUBSEQUENT NEWS” …. [pregnant pause]

The (friends ?)(professionals ?) have set up in the land of private enterprise.

Good for them.

But wait.

Someone has snaffled new cycleway planning and project management off DCC.

Noooo ! What ?

We thought we heard via SPOKES….. that “they” (the privateers) have ‘won’ (??) er, DCC’s new cycleway planning contracts to STUFF Dunedin roads.

Surely, they’d have had to go through an open tender process ?

Mmm. That remains to be seen.

Our Rates Money will go straight to the NOW Private Contractors in larger amounts probably.

Nah, don’t believe it. Can’t be True.

*Preferred Suppliers*—
Some Councillors know, some don’t.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: glendalecycles.com – Bob Lafay 12/03

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Dunedin Heritage Light Rail Trust —Update, July 2016

PUBLIC MEETING
Thursday, 28 July 2016 at 7pm
South Dunedin Presbyterian Hall (at back)
The Dunedin Heritage Light Rail Trust will hold a public meeting to update the community on its progress and announce the formation of the High Street Cable Car Society Inc, which will take over much of the work of the trust.

Mornington Trailer No. 111 [ODT files]Mornington Trailer No. 111 [ODT files]

ODT Online Thu, 7 Jul 2016
Cable car group seeks funds to build
By Timothy Brown
The group behind a bid to re-establish High St’s cable car route hopes to open its temporary display museum by Christmas. The Dunedin Heritage Light Rail Trust is applying for funding and building consent for its temporary 72sq m display museum after securing a lease in Mornington Park from the Dunedin City Council last month. The museum would house a trailer and two grip cars in a bid to raise funds for a proposed $2.5million future facility, trust member Neville Jemmett said. “This is what we are calling our elephant step, because it’s the first time we have got a foot on the ground. Everything has been in folders and papers before now,” he said. The museum would comprise a three-door steel garage with a track for Mornington trailer No111 to be rolled in and out to allow for access and to display it. “It’s only temporary, that’s why it’s not a fancy building. It’s to basically show people that we mean business.”
Read more

Mon, 11 July 2016 at 12:27 p.m.
Received from Neville Jemmett, Dunedin Heritage Light Rail Trust
July 2016 DHLRT Heritage newsletter (PDF, 8.17 MB)

[cover page]
July 2016 Heritage newsletter (front page)

Related Posts and Comments:
27.5.15 Dunedin Heritage Light Rail Trust Newsletters 2015
4.11.14 Phillip George (Phil) Cole, RIP
5.6.14 DCC Transport Strategy and Riccarton Road
28.7.13 Dunedin Cable Car Trust – Public Meetings Sunday 28 July
14.2.13 Phil Cole on the High Street Cable Car
15.1.13 Return of High Street cable car
23.12.11 High Street cable car update
29.11.10 Phillip Cole on Dunedin buses
16.9.10 Pre-election opinions on public transport and the stadium
26.11.09 The Chronicles of Yarnia
19.10.09 Cable Car Meeting @Dunedin
27.8.10 Invitation to ALL #High St Cable Car
23.11.09 High Street Cable Car a possibility
9.7.09 Designing public transport for repeat use

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

10 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Events, Finance, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Infrastructure, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Museums, Name, New Zealand, People, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Urban design, What stadium

Uber travel

1 day ago
MSN Motoring: The incredible rise of Uber

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Uber founders: Garrett Camp (left) and Travis Kalanick

What started out as a simple idea seven years ago to get a ride around the city is now a business worth $62.5 billion (£44.6bn). In October 2010, UberCab changed its name to Uber and went live on the Android smartphone operating system. In mid-2011, Uber went live in New York City. Since then it’s provided 80,000 rides per day! In July 2012, Uber unveiled Uber X. Using hybrid vehicles like the Prius, rides are 35% cheaper than Uber’s original black car service. In late 2014 Uber launched UberPOOL, which gives users the option of splitting the ride and cost with another person on a similar route. There’s so much more….

****

Uber – a mobile service where passengers can book rides – has become popular in Auckland and Wellington, and use of ride sharing apps is expected to become more common in the future.

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 19:01, December 14 2015
Uber set to face tighter rules, but not in-car cameras, Govt recommends
By Hamish Rutherford
Uber could be forced to check drivers’ log books and vehicle safety, after the Government recommended forcing it to become an approved transport operator. However drivers which use the mobile platform to find passengers appear set to continue to operate without being forced to install in-vehicle cameras, which are required in taxis. A review of regulations covering small passenger services, released on Monday [14.12.15], acknowledged that the existing rules, developed in the 1980s, had not kept pace with changes in technology.

Uber, the US-based company which was recently valued at around US$62.5 billion (NZ$93.2b) slammed the Government’s proposals as counter to its role to “open up” the economy, and did nothing to reduce regulation.

….The emergence of Uber has raised a global battle with taxis, which tend to face more rigorous regulations. Uber maintains that it is not a taxi service, but instead simply a technology platform, linking passengers with drivers who are private contractors. On Monday the Government released a consultation paper recommending that instead of maintaining a two-tier system for taxis and private hire providers, it would create a new single class system, where operators are responsible for safety and compliance. It comes almost a year after Associate Transport Minister Craig Foss announced a review of the rules.
Read more

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Wikipedia: Uber (company)
Founded: March 2009; 7 years ago
Services: Taxi, vehicles for hire
Slogan: Where lifestyle meets logistics
Website: uber.com

Uber Technologies Inc is an American multinational online transportation network company headquartered in San Francisco, California. It develops, markets and operates the Uber mobile app, which allows consumers with smartphones to submit a trip request which is then routed to Uber drivers who use their own cars. As of May 28, 2015, the service was available in 58 [today: 60] countries and 300 cities worldwide. Since Uber’s launch, several other companies have copied its business model, a trend that has come to be referred to as “Uberification”. Uber was founded as “UberCab” by Travis Kalanick and Garrett Camp in 2009 and the app was released the following June. Beginning in 2012, Uber expanded internationally. In 2014, it experimented with carpooling features and made other updates. Klout ranked the San Francisco-based company as the 48th-most powerful company in America in 2014. By late-2015, Uber was estimated to be worth $62.5 billion. Cont/

█ The legality of Uber has been challenged by governments and taxi companies, who allege that its use of drivers who are not licensed to drive taxicabs is unsafe and illegal.

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### ODT Online Sun, 20 Mar 2016
Residents on board with petition
The wider Green Island community is jumping on board in its support for changing the controversial Concord bus routes. A petition will be presented to the Otago Regional Council next Wednesday.
Greater Green Island Community Network co-ordinator Lynda Davidson said the petition, which has more than 300 signatures, asked the ORC to consider returning the Concord bus system to its original route through South Dunedin, while also keeping some of the express services direct to the University of Otago. […] Without the direct routes, people wanting to get to South Dunedin had to bus into the central city and then catch another bus south, which was taking longer and also costing people more.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Shutterstock via msn.com

14 Comments

Filed under Business, Coolness, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Tourism, Transportation, Urban design

Traffic lights: Anzac Avenue/Frederick Street intersection

Four questions put to DCC Transportation Planning today:

● What work is needed to activate the traffic lights at Anzac/Frederick?
● Why it is requiring remediation?
● How much it will cost?
● Why weren’t the lights just switched on as planned in early December immediately after the site [Hall Brothers yard – Anzide Properties Ltd] was cleared?

The argument goes like this: there was a break made in a fibre optic cable during site clearance at Hall Bros yard. Chorus billed the property owner for the breakage. The property owner didn’t know the cable existed or that it had been attached to one of their buildings on site.

Meanwhile, DCC says the cable issue isn’t connected to the traffic lights not working.

So back to those questions:

DCC says new medians and yellow-dot pads are being added at crossings, and ‘green boxes’ for cyclists are being re-scoped — for improved traffic management, and cycle and pedestrian safety; the 5-way intersection is being turned to a *4-way* intersection (with the access way formerly used by Hall Bros being removed) — simplifying the intersection and lights control of it.

Tony Avery 3DCC says all work to cost circa $100,000.

Timelines as such around the holiday break meant the traffic lights weren’t turned on earlier [in December, immediately following site clearance by Hall Bros].

DCC says Tony Avery will likely handle media statements on completion of the project.
(why is Mr Avery still at DCC, he’s retained until the new GM arrives in February)

The real story?

Hall Bros had to clear their site by a certain date in December 2014. They did.
Chorus turned up the next day saying the property owner had broken the cable.
Chorus had no easement. The cable should not have been there.

The irony of the lights not working because they were connected illegally to a building on the land that had to be cleared because the lights were illegally installed, is THE ANSWER.

Remember, DCC says the cable issue isn’t connected to the traffic lights not working.

Ye Gods of Irony, please do not explode.

DCC Webmap - Anzac AvenueDCC Webmap – Anzac Avenue/Frederick Street [click to enlarge]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr —with thanks to correspondents for their wording, collaged

*Image: Tony Avery – tweaked by whatifdunedin

30 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Fun, Geography, Hot air, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

NZ child poverty rates “stagnating”

### dunedintv.co.nz October 30, 2014 – 5:57pm
NZ child poverty rates haven’t improved since 2008
A new report from UNICEF shows child poverty rates in New Zealand haven’t improved since 2008. That’s prompted calls from locals for more governmental action to address the issue. And it seems even kids in Dunedin are feeling the effects of poverty. Video

Unicef - Children of the Recession (cover) Oct 2014### unicef.org.nz 29 October 2014
UNICEF cautions child poverty rates are “stagnating” in New Zealand
An international report by UNICEF has found that child poverty rates in New Zealand have barely changed since 2008, despite similar sized countries significantly reducing child poverty during the recent recession. UNICEF also revealed that youth unemployment has increased and more New Zealanders admit they do not have enough money to buy food.

The report, Children of the Recession, studied the impact of the global economic crisis on child wellbeing in 41 OECD and EU countries. It highlights the fact that the current and future lives of children have been – and are being – neglected in the global response to the Great Recession.

Read the full Children of the Recession report

Deborah Morris-Travers, National Advocacy Manager for UNICEF New Zealand, said: “The report shows that child poverty rates in New Zealand have stagnated, reducing by just 0.40 per cent since 2008. At the same time, Finland and Norway, states of a similar size to New Zealand, have reduced their child poverty rates by 4.30 and 3.20 per cent respectively. This strongly suggests that the government needs to review its approach to addressing child poverty and make policies for children a priority. There are many good examples of successful policies being implemented internationally, highlighting that child poverty is not an inevitable result of the recession if governments implement appropriate policy responses.”
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
9.12.13 UNICEF NZ statement on child poverty monitor
29.8.12 Beloved Prime Minister ‘Jonkey’ speaking #childpoverty
17.2.12 Salvation Army: The Growing Divide
23.11.11 Last night, did John Key watch Inside NZ (TV3): Inside Child Poverty
26.10.11 2011 Voices of Poverty: Research into poverty in Dunedin
9.1.11 Detroit: “Make no little plans”

8 Comments

Filed under Democracy, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, What stadium

Otago Regional Council: Buses —Journey Planner (now online)

ANOTHER REASON ORC SHOULD KEEP MANAGING THE DUNEDIN BUS SYSTEM

### ODT Online Wed, 28 May 2014
Internet bus trip planner
Bus users can now find the best route to travel using a new internet-based journey planner. The planner is available on the Otago Regional Council’s website and uses Google transit information. Council corporate services director Wayne Scott said the planner was introduced to make the council’s bus timetable more accessible. Users of the journey planner enter a bus journey starting point and destination.
Read more

Website: http://www.orc.govt.nz/Information-and-Services/Buses/

ORC Journey Planner (buses)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

82 Comments

Filed under Business, Democracy, Design, Economics, Fun, Geography, Innovation, Media, ORC, People, Project management

Roading network screwed by council staff

UNDEMOCRATIC—Council staff agendas are directing major changes to Dunedin’s road networks. Continued use of exclusive ‘workshops’ lacks transparency and accountability.

Cr Hilary Calvert asks ‘why councillors were not more involved in developing the strategic cases’. (ODT)

Cr Lee Vandervis says ‘the problems identified were based on ”absurd or probably false” assumptions’. (ODT)

STAFF ASSUMPTIONS
► There is too much parking in Dunedin
► Restricted parking will increase use of public transport
► Encouraging more people to cycle makes roads safer

  • ### ODT Online Tue, 6 May 2014
    Council notes roading strategic cases
    By Debbie Porteous
    The first step towards securing funding for major changes to Dunedin’s road networks has been taken by the Dunedin City Council, even though exactly what those changes will be is yet to be decided. Councillors yesterday noted council staff had taken the first of six steps in a new process for applying for funding from the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).
    Read more

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    Strategic Case Development for Improvements to Dunedin’s Central City and Freight Network
    Report – ISC – 05/05/2014 (PDF, 993.6 KB)

    Excerpts from the report…

    Council staff have recently submitted two Strategic Case applications to the NZ Transport Agency; one for investment to improve the access, mobility and safety of the Central City; and the other to enhance Dunedin’s Freight Network. Pending approval from the NZTA, Council staff will begin the Programme Business Case stage, where investment options and alternatives will begin to be developed and defined. Staff will seek Councillor support and input prior to the submission of the Programme Business Case to the NZ Transport Agency, anticipated to be later this year.

    The NZ Transport Agency has recently adopted a Better Business Case approach to guide the planning and project development for investment applications. It is a principles-based approach that clearly links their investment goals to outcomes, and defines problems and their consequences thoroughly before solutions are considered. This approach ensures a shared view of problems and benefits early in the transport planning process. The business case approach encourages early engagement with stakeholders to confirm:
    ● fit with strategy and need to invest
    ● the way forward with short-listed options
    ● that the best value option is affordable and deliverable and that the risks are acceptable.

    To execute many of the projects outlined in Dunedin’s Integrated Transport Strategy requires funding from external sources. A significant source of transportation funding is potentially available from the NZ Transport Agency. As detailed above, Council must now apply for funding from the NZ Transport Agency through their Better Business Case approach. This stepped approach ensures that any solutions are in response to clearly defined problems, and are aligned to the NZ Transport Agency’s investment goals.

    Council staff held initial discussions with key stakeholders, the NZ Transport Agency and the Otago Regional Council to define the areas of focus for investment. The group agreed that the Council should focus on establishing two Strategic Cases: 1. Dunedin Central City: Access, Mobility and Safety; 2. Dunedin Freight Network. These areas strongly align with those set out in our Integrated Transport Strategy.

    The first step of establishing the Strategic Case is to develop an Investment Logic Map (ILM). The ILMs set out the key problems and the benefits of solving the problems. Two ILM workshops were hosted for each of the areas of focus. Participants included the key stakeholders (DCC staff, Council Committee Chairs – Cr Wilson, Cr Benson-Pope, Cr McTavish; NZ Transport Agency and the ORC) and relevant partner organisations (including Otago Chamber of Commerce, Public Health South, Port Otago Ltd, Kiwirail, and Heavy Haulage Association).

    [see ILMs for each Strategic Case at Attachment 1]

    Strategic Case – Executive Summary
    Staff from the Dunedin City Council (DCC), the NZ Transport Agency and Otago Regional Council (ORC), as well as the Public Health Service and the Otago Chamber of Commerce participated in two Investment Logic Mapping (ILM) workshops to identify the key access, mobility and safety problems in central Dunedin, and determine the benefits of investing in solutions that address these problems.

    This report sets out the strategic case for improving access, mobility and safety in central Dunedin. Part A provides the strategic context and fit of the proposed investment and the evidence to support the justification for investment. Part B describes how the three contributing organisations intend to develop the next stage of business planning – the programme business case. This section outlines the further planning needed to achieve the identified benefits.

    This application shows that that there are some key synergies between the strategies and objectives of the three key stakeholder organisations, where priorities for future investment align. Evidence supporting each of the key problems identified in the ILM workshops is outlined section 3.4, and reveals a strong case for change and need for investment.

    3.1 Defining the Problem
    Dunedin City Council convened a facilitated investment logic mapping workshop that was held on 10th February 2014, with key stakeholders to gain a better understanding of current issues and business needs. The stakeholder panel identified and agreed to the following key problems:

    Problem one: SH1, the railway and north/south arterial routes bisect areas of high pedestrian use resulting in dislocation and poor connectivity of key areas

    Problem two: The design, use and management of central city routes results in intermodal conflict

    Problem three: Management and provision of car parking is not integrated into the transport network, which favours car use, impacting adversely on the quality of life in the City

    Problem four: The design, management and lack of integration of public transport discourages use and leads to low patronage

    [see the Investment Logic Map at Appendix A]

    3.2 The Benefits of Investment
    The potential benefits of successfully investing to address these were identified as part of a second facilitated investment logic mapping held on 17th February, 2014. The stakeholder panel identified and agreed the following potential benefits for the proposal: (CONFIRM)

    ● Benefit one: Reduced severance
    ● Benefit two: Improved safety
    ● Benefit three: Central City is a ‘nice place to be’
    ● Benefit four: Greater resilience

    [see Benefit Map at Appendix B]

    Figure 1: High risk areas identified through risk mapping

    Figure 1 High risk areas identified through risk mappingA risk assessment process known as KiwiRAP maps the collective crash risk of roads based on the physical and operating characteristics of intersections and corridors, as well as crash history. The map shows that Dunedin’s high risk areas (shown in black and red) are predominantly located within the central city, as demonstrated in Figure 1.

    4 Strategic Context
    This section demonstrates how the investment proposal has clear linkages to existing strategies of each of the stakeholders. There are some key synergies between the three organisations, where priorities for future investment align. A summary of the strategies that support this investment proposal from each of the stakeholders is detailed below. The goals and/or objectives selected are those with direct relevance to this investment proposal.

    6.4 Scope
    The evidence to support the three problem statements developed during the Investment Logic Mapping workshops generally provides a strong case for change. It is also evident that many of the problems have existed for some time as many of the issues raised were recognised in the MWH 2003 Strategic Corridor Study and the 2006 Transport Strategy.

    7.1 Risk/Issues and Opportunities
    Key risks for this business case are likely to include:
    ● Alignment with Regional Land Transport Plan and Council’s Long Term Plan Timeframes
    ● Ability for Council to raise funding co-contribution
    ● Support for the projects from Councillors
    ● Support for the projects from the community
    ● Further deaths and serious injuries from crashes should the project not proceed
    Appropriate risk management strategies for these key risks will be identified at the Programme Business Case stage. As the busine ss case evolves and projects are defined it is likely that other risks are likely to be identified and these will be added to the risk register.

    Read full report here.

    ****

    Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy 2013
    Developing, maintaining and operating any transport system requires investment, and investment requires decision-making about what to invest in, how much to invest and when that investment should be made. Such decisions need to be informed by an understanding of the key issues and opportunities to be addressed, a clear vision of what is to be achieved, and a clear set of priorities that will move toward that vision. In times of financial constraint when funding is tight the need to clearly identify the right priorities becomes even more important. The DCC have adopted a Financial Strategy which aims to help steer a course between the competing tensions of affordability, keeping up and investing for the future. This Financial Strategy states the limits to rates and borrowing that the Council has set, and any investment in transportation infrastructure must be managed with regard to the Financial Strategy.

    Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy 2013 [links]
    Pre-election Report 2.8.13 [links]
    Financial Strategy

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    32 Comments

    Filed under Business, COC (Otago), Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, NZTA, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

    Otago Heritage Bus shines !!! —ORC holiday bus suspension, patchy city services reprehensible

    Otago Heritage Bus(1) LL-194Image: Otago Heritage Bus Society Inc

    ### ODT Online Thu, 26 Dec 2013
    Otago Heritage Bus Society counts its takings
    By Rosie Manins
    Gold coin donations for a novel Christmas bus service will help restoration projects by the Otago Heritage Bus Society. The society operated heritage buses on two routes through Dunedin yesterday when all other public bus services were suspended for Christmas.
    Bus passengers were encouraged to bring their pet dogs along for the ride and give a donation to the society as their fare.
    Society treasurer Jacqui Hellyer said the hill route, encompassing St Kilda, the Octagon, Halfway Bush and Brockville was especially popular.
    Read more

    Website: Otago Heritage Bus Society Inc
    About the Society
    Join the Society — Membership
    Volunteers wanted — Drivers (P and/or HT endorsements), Conductors, Bus Valets, Automotive and Mechanical knowhow, Administration & Archiving, Hospitality & Frontline Experience

    ****

    ### ODT Online Thu, 26 Dec 2013
    Opinion
    All we ask for is a decent bus service
    By Lynley Hood
    I live on the Corstorphine-Kew bus route. I know how bad the service is. But it took the latest provocation – the Otago Regional Council’s “Proposed Changes to the Bus Services” – to drive me from apathy, to research, to rage, to writing.
    The Public Transport Management Act defines “transport disadvantaged” as “people whom the regional council has reasonable grounds to believe are the least able to get to basic community activities and services (for example, work, education, healthcare, welfare, and food shopping)”.
    Read more

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    8 Comments

    Filed under Business, Democracy, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Media, Name, New Zealand, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design

    UNICEF NZ statement on child poverty monitor

    “The Monitor tells us that 159,000 children (60% of those in poverty) are living in poverty for long periods of time. Living in persistent poverty will undermine a child’s physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing with the potential for long-term damage.”

    UNICEF NZ Statement on Child Poverty Monitor
    Monday, 9 December 2013, 10:05 am
    Press Release: UNICEF

    UNICEF NZ Statement on Child Poverty Monitor, Released Today by OCC

    The inaugural Child Poverty Monitor, released today (Monday, 9 December) by the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC), JR McKenzie Trust and the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service at Otago University, contains some deeply concerning figures. However, it is an important step forward for tracking how well New Zealand is doing in giving children the standard of living they need.
    Deborah Morris-Travers, UNICEF New Zealand Advocacy Manager, said, “It’s of significant concern that 10% of Kiwi Kids – twice the rate of the New Zealand population as a whole – are living in severe poverty.
    Read more at Scoop

    Welcome to the First Child Poverty Monitor Technical Report
    Monday, 9 December 2013, 9:44 am
    Press Release: Child Poverty Monitor

    Welcome to the First Child Poverty Monitor Technical Report

    This Technical Report marks a new step in monitoring child poverty and social health indicators in New Zealand. It began with a partnership being established between the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the University of Otago’s New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES) and the J R McKenzie Trust. This partnership saw a gap in publicly-available child poverty measures, and is addressing this gap by compiling, publishing and disseminating annual measurements on child poverty in New Zealand.
    Last year, the Children’s Commissioner’s Expert Advisory Group (EAG) on Solutions to Child Poverty recommended that a suite of measures capturing different aspects of child poverty be measured and reported annually. We are fulfilling this recommendation. This new Technical Report builds on the Children’s Social Health Monitor (CSHM) produced by the NZCYES since 2009. We have added additional indicators that enable us to monitor child poverty in New Zealand. Along with this full Technical Report we have produced very high level information on the key measures of child poverty, which are available at http://www.childpoverty.co.nz.
    We want to promote the common use of rigorous measures of poverty, so we can stop debating about the measure and start fixing the problem.

    More info\

    Report: 2013_Child_Poverty_Monitor_Technical_Report_MASTER.pdf

    ****

    ### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 09/12/2013
    One in four Kiwi children living in poverty
    By Ben Heather – Dominion Post
    More children living in crammed homes are ending up in hospital, as a new report shows one in four children remain mired in poverty. A new rigorous measure of child poverty released today shows that about one in six Kiwi children are going without basic necessities. This could mean not having a bed, delaying a doctor’s visit or missing out on meals. It also shows hospital admissions for children with medical conditions linked to poverty are rising. Tens of thousands of children are admitted every year for respiratory and infectious diseases associated with living in damp, overcrowded homes. “I see these poor preschool children in crowded homes that are cold and damp coming in with skin infections. They are filling our wards,” Children’s Commissioner Russell Wills, a Hawke’s Bay paediatrician, said.

    Children, particularly the youngest, remain the most impoverished group of New Zealanders, three times more likely to live in poverty than those past retirement age.

    And the gap between those going without and the rest is showing no signs of narrowing, with children born to solo beneficiary parents by far the most likely to get sick or injured. But child poverty is also reaching far beyond beneficiaries, with about two out of five impoverished kids living in working families. Overall 265,000 children live in poverty, which is measured by children living in households with less than 60 per cent of the median income after housing costs.
    The report, called the Child Poverty Monitor, was commissioned by Dr Wills after the Government rejected calls to start a comprehensive measure of child poverty.
    Read more

    STATE OF CHILD POVERTY (via Dominion Post)

    █ 265,000 children live in poverty, defined by income.
    █ 1 in 3 Maori and Pacific children live in poverty.
    █ 1 in 7 European children live in poverty.
    █ 1 in 6 struggle to afford basic necessities such as healthcare and clothing.
    █ 1 in 10 suffer from severe poverty, lacking basic necessities and adequate income.
    █ 3 out of 5 will be living in poverty for much of their childhood.
    █ 51 per cent are from sole parent families. 60 per cent are from beneficiary families.

    ****

    Radio New Zealand National
    Nine to Noon with Kathryn Ryan
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon
    Monday 9 December 2013
    The inaugural Child Poverty Monitor ( 11′ 30″ )
    09:35 Dr Liz Craig is a Senior Clinical Epidemiologist at the University of Otago.
    Audio | Download: Ogg  |  MP3

    Related Posts and Comments:
    29.8.12 Beloved Prime Minister ‘Jonkey’ speaking #childpoverty
    17.2.12 Salvation Army: The Growing Divide
    26.11.11 2011 Voices of Poverty: Research into poverty in Dunedin
    23.11.11 Last night, did John Key watch Inside New Zealand (TV3): Inside Child Poverty

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    68 Comments

    Filed under Business, Democracy, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, What stadium

    Cycle lobby games and media tilts

    Bike commuter 1 [cycling.com]Commuters [cycling.com]

    ### ODT Online Sat, 19 Oct 2013
    Leuchs accuses Vandervis
    By Chris Morris
    Dunedin city councillor Lee Vandervis has been accused of misrepresenting former Olympian Kashi Leuchs’ views on cycleways to ”push forward his own agenda” at a recent Dunedin City Council meeting.
    However, Cr Vandervis hit back yesterday, denying the claim and saying any suggestion he did so deliberately was ”slanderous”.
    Read more

    Correspondence received.

    —– Original Message —–
    From: Lee Vandervis
    To: Elizabeth Kerr
    Sent: Saturday, October 19, 2013 1:51 PM
    Subject: FW: reaction? Feel free to quote.

    ODT reporter Chris Morris has muddied rather than clarified the issues around my supposed misrepresentation of statements made by serious cyclists, including an employee running the Bike Otago shop.

    Even worse, the Bike Otago owner Kashi Leuchs who I have never met or discussed anything with, wades in to today’s ODT and on his blog pretending to be one of the blokes that I spoke with running his shop and pretending he took part in or heard the supposedly misrepresented conversation!
    The millions we have already spent on Dunedin ‘painted on’ cycle lanes are now not what they want according to their blog, but they have no idea of how what they do want will work at intersections.
    How much more do they want ratepayers to spend to reinvent the cycle lane?

    Cheers,
    Lee

    —— Forwarded Message
    From: Lee Vandervis
    Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 13:31:04 +1300
    To: Chris Morris [ODT]
    Conversation: reaction?
    Subject: Re: reaction?

    First time this has been brought to my attention thanks Chris.

    The Bike Otago blog confirms just what I said and that I accurately described these serious cyclists reservations about existing cycle lanes;

    “So we would just like to put a little context to what Lee tells the council here. Lee states that we said that cycling lanes actually give cyclists a false sense of security… But what Lee has missed out is the words ‘painted on’. For sure, we, like almost all cyclists you ask are against the painted on cycling lanes, similar to what we currently have on our one way system.”

    I did not miss out the words “painted on” as these words were never mentioned in the cycle-shop discussion, and ‘painted on’ is mostly what we have.

    This still leaves the most dangerous part of any road – the intersections – as needing special provision which is often provided overseas by cyclists/pedestrian stop lights on separated cyclelane/footpaths.

    The statement “What Lee states about intersections not being separable is not something that we would consider hard to fix… it would just take a bit of good planning to ensure everyone can enjoy the roads safely together.” fails to suggest just what planning/expense might reduce the latest car-park-lane separated cycleway intersection danger issue, and fails to give any overseas examples.

    I have studied and photographed European cycleway solutions this year [at my own expense] in Munich, Barcelona, Heidelberg and Berlin and have spent weeks cycling around the last two cities. The most common cycleway solution in these cities is shared cycleway/footpaths separated from moving cars by parked cars. Next most common is our painted cycle lanes. Even when separated cycle-lanes/footpaths were marked with dividing lines, most serious cyclists [carbon fibre/lycra/commuter] still rode with the car traffic as this was faster and easier at intersections.
    This highlights that there are many different cycling styles and preferences, and claims that a new separated car-park-lane cycleway will please most cyclists is misleading.

    My question to the new enthusiasts for wiping out 200+ car-parks all the way up the one-way street and having a physically separated bicycle path along the car-parking strip, is why not use the under-used eastern footpath as a separated cycle lane, as recommended recently in the ODT by roading engineer Paul Hambleton, and which has plenty of relatively safe precedent overseas? I have previously asked staff to consider this overseas proven option, and had a Council resolution supporting this.
    I believe we need a proven cost-effective compromise that recognises all road users as well as a variety of cyclists styles, from the recreational to the serious. So far my shared-eastern-foot-path solution is the only affordable one I have seen.

    Cheers,
    Lee

    On 18/10/13 12:18 PM, “Chris Morris” wrote:

    Hi Lee,

    Not sure if you’re aware of the post about you on http://www.bikeotago.co.nz/

    They’re taking issue with your earlier comments at a council meeting in September, when you claimed Bike Otago cyclists and the bloke that run the shop did not support cycleways.

    I’d like your response by 5pm at the latest, but as soon as possible, actually, as I may need to do follow-ups.

    Chris.

    —— End of Forwarded Message

    —— Forwarded Message
    From: Lee Vandervis
    Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 16:37:37 +1300
    To: Chris Morris
    Conversation: reaction?
    Subject: Re: reaction?

    Bike Otago’s own quotation “we, like almost all cyclists you ask are against the painted on cycling lanes,” confirms that they are opposed to current cycle lanes, and shows that I did not misquote them Chris.
    Nobody specified ‘painted on’ at the time, but the news that theses cyclists are against the already considerable expensive Dunedin cycle lanes should be of wide interest.
    If Bike Otago want to fully represent their views at Council on a new specific type of separated cycleway that has not yet been detailed, designed, intersection explained, or built, they are welcome to try and do so.

    The record shows;
    It was moved (Vandervis/Hudson):
    “1 That the Council further consult with the AA on cycle safety proposals.
    2 That the eastern footpath of the One Way North be considered as a long-term separated cycle way.”
    A request was made to take each recommendation separately. Motion 1 was put and carried.
    Motion 2 was put and carried with Cr MacTavish voting against.

    that I have pushed for a much more affordable separated cycleway not requiring the loss of 200+ car-parks along the unused eastern footpath as regularly seen overseas. Whether Bike Otago approve of this or not is up to them to say.
    I don’t have an own agenda other than to prevent an enormous waste of ratepayers and limited Transit funds on a new type of separated cycleway yet to be designed that does not address the statistically most dangerous intersections.
    For you or anyone else to suggest that I deliberately misrepresented unnamed serious cyclists chatting in a cycle-shop is slanderous.

    Kind regards,
    Lee

    Related Posts and Comments:
    24.9.13 Mediocrity and lack of critical awareness at DCC
    9.9.13 Residents’ dissatisfaction (2013) with elected council and mayor —increase!
    4.9.13 Draft Dunedin City Transport Strategy
    30.8.13 Transport Strategy: Is this responsible local government?

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    3 Comments

    Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

    Draft Dunedin City Transport Strategy

    Read the draft strategy here. [DCC webpage and links]

    Comment received.

    BlueBottle
    Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 1:28 pm

    Lee Vandervis was very impressive at the transport strategy hearing on Monday. Lee challenged all the ridiculous assumptions that the strategy is based on. He did this using factual well researched arguments. Council staff were forced to back down on many points because there was no factual basis for their conclusions. Lee’s performance was remarkable because there was one of him against 4 Councillors and the Transport Planning/City Development staff who had a whole weekend to find ways to respond to Lee’s challenges. Although Lee helped to make some improvements to the strategy, the thing is still deeply flawed and will be harmful for Dunedin if it is accepted by the whole Council.
    The Network Operating Plan (fig. 24) has been kept quiet by the DCC and the ODT. The plan is to make a big chunk of the CBD either car-less or mostly car-less. The methods of hindering motor vehicles haven’t been described but will be achieved with total bans from some streets as well as removing parking and restrictions on turning and entry. Another plan is to fiddle with the timing of traffic lights so as to cause intolerable delays to motorists. Have a look to see which streets are affected. While in their vision they see hoards of cyclists and pedestrians, more likely the CBD will become empty and turned into an economic dead-zone. The Network Operating Plan and the rest of the Transport Strategy are among the biggest threats that Dunedin faces.

    Developing a Network Operating Plan [DCC]

    Figure 24. Draft Network Operating Plan for the central cityFigure 24. Draft Network Operating Plan for the central city

    Email received.
    Tuesday, September 03, 2013 11:05 PM

    —— Forwarded Message
    From: Lee Vandervis
    Date: Sun, 01 Sep 2013 09:06:00 +1200
    To: Wendy Collard, Sarah Connolly, Emerson Yeoman, Sue Bidrose, Sandy Graham, Paul Orders
    Cc: Kate Wilson, Andrew Noone, Jinty MacTavish, Teresa Stevenson
    Conversation: Draft Transport Strategy Hearing additional data requested.
    Subject: Re: Draft Transport Strategy Hearing additional data requested.

    Ta Wendy,

    Questions as follows:

    Can I see Data to justify claims of:

    1 – significant car ownership increase in the last 15 years/many Dunedin households now do not have access to a car. [A graph would be ideal]
    2 – reduced fatalities and serious accidents [increasing safety] when transferring from automobile to pedestrian and cycling modes of transport [Elvik’s opinion on safety in numbers is not data and suggests only possibility with very large numbers of transfer not possible in a hilly city]
    3 – increasing fossil fuel prices since 1974 “rising fuel costs” “Rising fuel prices are likely to lead to changes not only in travel behaviour and people’s choice of transport mode” “Assumption 1: The cost of fuel will continue to increase”
    4 – increasing fuel efficiency of cars since 1974
    5 – “much of car travel in Dunedin [or anywhere else] is non-essential”
    6 – “other options are available for most trips”
    7 – “deaths/serious injury of vulnerable road users [cyclists pedestrians] around schools” and “Safety problems at the school gate” “The research highlights that the transitory nature of traffic around schools has tended to hide the risks this situation presents to all users, but especially to children.”
    8 – “poor provision for other modes and little congestion has led to high crash rates”
    9 – “In part due to wide, high-speed urban street environments (such as the one-way system, Andersons Bay Road, Princes Street, and Hillside Road) and poor provision for other modes (such as buses, walking and cycling), road safety has suffered in Dunedin”
    10 – “provision for private motor vehicles has also meant amenity, pedestrian connectivity and, in some instances, surrounding land use value has suffered”
    11 – “Demand for cheap, convenient, and consistent on and off-street parking availability is no longer a realistic expectation with Dunedin’s modern high level of car use”
    12 – “despite the fact that many children would prefer to cycle, scooter or walk to school”
    13 – “it appears the cost of transport fuel will continue to rise for the foreseeable future. This is already having an effect on the way people are choosing to travel.”?

    If reliable supporting data is not available, then these unsubstantiated claims and resultant aim to spend $47 million on cycling infrastructure should be removed from the Draft.

    Kind regards,
    Lee

    ——————————–

    On 30/08/13 5:44 PM, “Wendy Collard” wrote:

    Hi Lee

    The deliberations have now finished. Kate has asked if you could please have the questions that you require to be answered be [sic] to staff by 12 noon on Sunday.

    The hearing is going to carry on at 1pm on Monday as Public Forum has now been cancelled.

    Regards

    Wendy Collard
    Governance Support Officer
    Dunedin City Council
    50 The Octagon, Dunedin; PO Box 5045, Moray Place, Dunedin 9058, New Zealand
    Telephone: 03 474 3374, Fax: 03 474 3594

    Related Posts and Comments:
    30.8.13 Transport Strategy: Is this responsible local government?
    29.8.13 The Don, imagines . . .
    4.8.13 World War I memorial project
    24.11.11 Dunedin buses: ORC or DCC
    8.7.13 Bloody $tupid cycleways and Cull’s electioneering . . .
    28.3.13 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2013/14: Portobello Harington Point…
    8.3.13 Stupid bid for two-way highway ditched for now #DCC

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    239 Comments

    Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

    Transport Strategy: Is this responsible local government?

    DRAFT Dunedin City Transport Strategy (2013)

    The Otago Chamber of Commerce (COC) gets brownie points for taking a stick to Dunedin City Council and the politicised ‘sustainability crew’, this week… A crew primed with council staff, (spuriously-appointed) leadership and steering groups, university academics (with their little students in tow, aww) receiving substantial research funds into energy research, and the like; but let’s not forget the undue influence of Greater Dunedin and its two councillors, MacTavish and Wilson (paid $250 a day, was it?), sitting on the strategy panel – who, having spruced up their images lately (cutesy dyed haircuts, necklaces and dresses in adornment – closely resembling the old ‘pearl and cardy set’), will find the clobber just too awkward for bike riding.

    It’s recognised the Chamber can’t hope to represent the wide breadth of Dunedinites – but it’s fair to say the Chamber’s focus and agendas (collectively and personally) are experienced as being unbearably narrow at times and slant at others – for example, its handling of the Dunedin harbourside plan change appeal, and its support for the new stadium (knife to the throat of Dunedin’s economy) and the proposed apartment and hotel development at 41 Wharf Street (cheap bling, with strings). All up, the Chamber is a mysterious if not loose male-order assembly of ‘business minds’.

    Nevertheless, DCC, give your dog a bone…
    But don’t think the Chamber will accept more stupidity from your transportation planners and general managers controlling the whole (desktop) strategic exercise —or from the ‘mission’ of idealistic ‘non-business’ greenies who lack the commonsense, experience, resilience and determination of Dunedin companies (the ones who actually make the dollars happen!), and which greenies will surely fail if pitted hard against Otago’s most successful export earners!!

    The Transport Strategy is not a statutory document – but where it attempts to flow into District Plan changes, well, let’s wait for all the costly appeals to Environment Court. The council can hardly afford more legal battles – it can’t fund the challenges it’s already immured by.

    The worst fear with the transport strategy revolves around pending changes to the Resource Management Act (RMA) which could see council-driven and developer-driven projects bulldozed through without public consultation; with few benefits to anyone or the environment, except to the proponents. The new legislation will mean even less accountability and transparency in local government than ever before – thanks to the National-led government. You know who to vote for in 2014.

    Do you know who to vote for in 2013?

    ### ODT Online Fri, 30 Aug 2013
    Attack on transport strategy
    By Chris Morris
    The Otago Chamber of Commerce has launched an attack on Dunedin’s draft transport strategy, saying it pushed a ”questionable agenda” of sustainability while ignoring major transport issues. The strongly-worded rebuke came in the chamber’s submission on the Dunedin City Council’s draft strategy, presented on the first day of a two-day public hearing yesterday.
    However, Prof Herbert Harris, a member of the chamber’s logistics committee, also offered an olive branch at the hearing by suggesting a joint working party be formed to fix the document’s flaws.

    Prof Harris said the strategy was of ”major concern” because it ignored the inadequate arterial route through the city, a lack of commuter parking and the significance of the road link to Port Otago.

    The draft strategy sought to identify and address key transport challenges facing the city over the next 30 years, beginning with improving the city’s poor road safety record. Initiatives proposed included everything from a multimillion-dollar central-city upgrade, to improved cycleways, bus services and a new eastern freight bypass. Prof Harris said the strategy was of ”major concern” because it ignored the inadequate arterial route through the city, a lack of commuter parking and the significance of the road link to Port Otago.
    Read more

    Draft Dunedin City Transport Strategy 2013 (1)GREY AREAS… If you received this DRAFT Summary by post in late July, look no further than the grey back cover – it’s easier to read than the illegible and contrived contents, having about the same informational content.

    ****

    ### ODT Online Fri, 30 Aug 2013
    Transport transfer considered
    By Chris Morris
    The Otago Regional Council says it will consider handing responsibility for public transport to the Dunedin City Council.
    Council transportation planning manager Sarah Connolly confirmed a report on the issue was being finalised, and the chief executives of both organisations, Paul Orders and Peter Bodeker, would be briefed within weeks. Councillors from both organisations were yet to see the report, but a decision on how to proceed would be decided after the briefing, she said.
    The news came two years after the Otago Daily Times reported the DCC and ORC were in talks about a possible transfer of the public transport network to the city council.
    Read more

    Related Posts and Comments:
    29.8.13 The Don, imagines . . .
    4.8.13 World War I memorial project
    24.11.11 Dunedin buses: ORC or DCC
    8.7.13 Bloody $tupid cycleways and Cull’s electioneering . . .
    28.3.13 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2013/14: Portobello Harington Point…
    8.3.13 Stupid bid for two-way highway ditched for now #DCC

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    60 Comments

    Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, ORC, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design

    Dunedin Cable Car Trust – Public Meetings SUNDAY 28 July

    Mornington cable train, High St 1

    The trust will hold two public meetings to provide information on the High Street Cable Car project, including details on how people can help, and a question and answer session.

    WHERE Hutton Theatre, Otago Museum
    WHEN Sunday 28 July
    SESSIONS 1pm – 3pm or 3pm – 5pm

    Entry by gold coin donation

    ALL WELCOME

    Website: http://dunedincablecars.co.nz/

    Related Post and Comments:
    14.2.13 Phil Cole on the High Street Cable Car [most recent comments]
    15.1.13 Return of High Street cable car
    23.12.11 High Street cable car update
    27.8.10 Invitation to ALL #High St Cable Car
    25.11.09 High Street cable car
    23.11.09 High Street Cable Car a possibility
    19.10.09 Cable Car Meeting @Dunedin

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    2 Comments

    Filed under Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Name, New Zealand, People, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

    Phil Cole on the High Street Cable Car

    Mornington cable train, High St

    ### ODT Online Wed, 13 Feb 2013
    Opinion
    Cable car project has popular aims
    By Phillip Cole
    Achieving an 86% positive response to the recent online ODT poll – ”`Would you like to see a cable car operating up High St?” – was a pleasant, but not surprising, result for the Dunedin Cable Car Trust. From the 994 votes cast, 852 were in favour. The votes reflect the opinion of just under 1% of Dunedin’s population, but it is enough to give us encouragement. Recreating the cable car on High St creates enormous challenges. To overcome these, the trust needs to be pragmatic and innovative to make sure Dunedin is left with an asset rather than a liability. To this end, the trust has spent a lot of time developing a project that will appeal to, and have the support of, a majority.
    Some, including those in support of the cable car, are still under the misconception money for the project will come from the Dunedin City and Otago Regional Councils. However, the first matter agreed was that the trust was not going to ask the councils for a cent. We want to create a project the people of Dunedin and further afield can get behind and feel part of. Those who don’t want to support the project would be under no financial obligation to do so.
    Read more + Images

    ● Phillip Cole is chairman of the Dunedin Cable Car Trust (est. 23 July 2008)

    Dunedin had the first cable car system outside of the United States opening in 1881. San Francisco Municipal Railway became the sole operator of cable car service in the world with the closure of the Mornington line in Dunedin on 2 March 1957.

    Related Posts and Comments:
    15.1.13 Return of High Street cable car
    23.12.11 High Street cable car update
    27.8.10 Invitation to ALL #High St Cable Car
    25.11.09 High Street cable car
    23.11.09 High Street Cable Car a possibility
    19.10.09 Cable Car Meeting @Dunedin

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    61 Comments

    Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

    Beloved Prime Minister ‘Jonkey’ speaking #childpoverty

    ### ODT Online Tue, 28 Aug 2012
    Universal child benefit a ‘dopey’ idea: Key
    Prime Minister John Key has dismissed as “dopey” a recommendation from a panel of experts that a universal child payment should be reintroduced as a way of reducing child poverty. The expert advisory group brought together by Children’s Commissioner Dr Russell Wills to find solutions to child poverty released its recommendations today.

    Group members include AUT accounting expert James Prescott, Major Campbell Roberts of the Salvation Army, Professor Ritchie Poulton of the Dunedin School of Medicine and Philippa Howden-Chapman, a public health expert.

    Among [the group’s] recommendations for the longer term was a universal child payment for under sixes. The payment would be highest while the child was a baby, when costs were high, and would decline through childhood. Co-chair Dr Tracey McIntosh said the payment was about ensuring children had the best start in life. “Investment in the early years has a particularly strong link to better outcomes for disadvantaged children”.
    Read more

    Download report and related documents here:
    http://www.occ.org.nz/publications/child_poverty

    ****

    ### ODT Online Sun, 26 Aug 2012
    Child poverty costs country $6b a year: report
    Child poverty is costing New Zealand $6 billion each year, according a new report commissioned by organisation Every Child Counts.

    Every Child Counts chairman Murray Edridge defined poverty as children missing out on needed goods and services including adequate housing, nutrition, warm clothing and healthcare.

    Manager Deborah Morris-Travers told TVNZ’s political programme Q+A 25 per cent of children in New Zealand are living in poverty. She said it was concerning to see how poverty affected different ethnicities with 40 per cent of Pacific Island children and 27 per cent of Maori children living in poverty. The report, “1000 days to get it right for every child – the effectiveness of public investment in New Zealand children”, released this week, examines initiatives from the Netherlands which could be applied here. APNZ
    Read more

    Download report here:
    http://www.everychildcounts.org.nz/news/1000-days-to-get-it-right-for-every-child-poor-child-outcomes-costing-the-nation-billions/

    Household Incomes in New Zealand: Trends in Indicators of Inequality and Hardship 1982 to 2011 (Aug 2012)

    Download report and related documents here:
    http://www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/publications-resources/monitoring/household-incomes/index.html

    Related Posts and Comments:
    17.2.12 Salvation Army: The Growing Divide
    23.11.11 Last night, did John Key watch…(TV3): Inside Child Poverty
    26.10.11 2011 Voices of Poverty: Research into poverty in Dunedin

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    14 Comments

    Filed under Business, Economics, Geography, Media, People, Politics, Project management

    2011 Voices of Poverty: Research into poverty in Dunedin

    Between July 2010 and April 2011, Presbyterian Support Otago (PSO) interviewed eleven families who were representative of their client base. The intent was to gather information on the changes the families either experienced or put in place to mitigate the effects of the increase in GST (1 October 2010, from 12.5% to 15%), rising prices and an uncertain economic environment as New Zealand moved out of its recession.

    During the course of the interviews the government instituted the Future Focus policy direction and, allied to this, the Welfare Working Group reported on possible directions for consultation. Behind both of these initiatives was an expectation that all people of working age who are currently dependent on the government can, and will, be encouraged into paid employment.

    Ensuring that families and individuals have sufficient income to meet their basic needs (food, clothing, warm housing and medical care) is a priority; whether those families and individuals are on a benefit or a wage.
    Can We Do Better 2008

    As in previous reports PSO noted that juggling income, debt, inadequate housing, health and transport difficulties and parenting responsibilities is how people below the poverty line live their lives.

    The report concludes with recommendations for action by government, local bodies and the public sector. Has the landscape changed? For New Zealand – yes; we have been through a recession and survived. For the “voices of poverty” – no; for many, their landscape is as bleak as it ever was and for some the future doesn’t look great either.

    Has the Landscape Changed? 2011 (PDF, 7.17 MB)
    Can We Do Better 2008 (PDF, 1.52 MB)
    Old Cold and Costly 2004 (PDF, 2.98 MB)
    How Much is Enough : 2003 update (PDF, 137.16 KB)
    How Much Is Enough : 2002 research (PDF, 4.15 MB)

    Source: https://otago.ps.org.nz/resources

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    49 Comments

    Filed under Economics, People, Politics

    Wellington Towards 2040

    Forming the “digital powerhouse”…

    Wellington’s biggest assets are its compact form, its harbour setting and the quality of life. It also boasts a highly skilled population with the highest incomes in the country.

    ### idealog.co.nz 29 Sept 2011 @ 11:13 am
    Wellington’s new 30-year vision
    By Design Daily Team
    Last night Wellington City Council unanimously agreed on a long term vision for the city, one that will have sustainability, digital saviness and innovation at its core. Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown said the strategy, called Wellington Towards 2040: Smart Capital, would underpin and guide all Council strategies across economic, environmental, social, technology, transport and other key issues.

    The four goals identified by the council are:

    People-centred city – the aim is to be healthy, vibrant, affordable, resilient, have a strong sense of identity, and strong and healthy communities.

    Connected city – this is connectedness in every sense: physical, virtual or social. Strategies like the Digital Strategy fall under this.

    Eco-city – this is a response to all the environmental challenges the city faces over the coming decades, and the Council is confident [it] can lead the country by example.

    Dynamic central city – this section largely deals with urban design aspects of the central city – making sure it’s still a great place to be where new ideas happen – and maintaining its role as the creative and innovative force to drive the regional economy.

    Read more

    WCC Report (15 September 2011)

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    1 Comment

    Filed under Design, Economics, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

    Have your say: South Dunedin Retail Centre Strategy

    Issues and Opportunities Consultation Document
    (PDF, 458.7 kb, new window)

    DCC weblink for more information

    South Dunedin has historically been an important manufacturing and service area for Dunedin, and it remains a destination retail area for a large number of Dunedin residents. However, the trend over the last 15-20 years has been for a general decline in the main retail centre along King Edward Street, and a comparative increase in large format retail activities on the adjacent industrial land along Hillside Road and Andersons Bay Road.

    As a result of this general decline, many people have raised concerns over the increasingly dilapidated appearance of the main retail centre and the overall vibrancy and success of the centre from both an economic and social perspective. As a result, the Council has identified the need for a strategy to revitalise South Dunedin’s retail centre.

    The purpose of the South Dunedin Retail Centre Strategy is to identify an integrated package of actions that can be used to revitalise the retail centre, both economically and socially. The suggested goals for the strategy are to:

    » Re-establish the economic role of the South Dunedin retail centre as a retail destination for the city by developing the centre into a place that people want to visit and spend time.

    » Restore the social role of the centre as a place that provides opportunities for local residents to make regular contact with each other while engaged in routine activities.

    The package of actions required to achieve these goals will need to include actions by both the Council and the community, in order to be successful.

    The Issues and Opportunities Document is open for public consultation from 14 April 2010. Submitters are invited to return the submission form by 28 May 2010.

    Make your submissions via

    * Freepost: delivery details are on the form included with the consultation document (address to Principal Urban Designer, Dunedin City Council, PO Box 5045, Dunedin)

    * Submit your comments online by completing this online form

    * Email to south.dunedin@dcc.govt.nz

    * Delivery: Customer Services, ground floor of the Civic Centre, 50 The Octagon, Dunedin

    Dunedin City Council invites the community to comment on the range and relative importance of issues and opportunities identified to date.

    On Wednesday 12 May, a public open day on South Dunedin Retail Centre – Issues and Opportunities was held at the Gasworks Museum in Braemar St, South Dunedin.

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    1 Comment

    Filed under Architecture, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, People, Project management, Town planning, Urban design