Monthly Archives: December 2012

Internal Affairs is a whole other planet #whitecollarcrime #DIArorts

● The Trusts Charitable Foundation (TTCF Inc) ● The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd (TTCF Ltd) ● Otago Rugby Football Union (ORFU) ● Professional Rugby ● Centre of Excellence for Amateur Sport ● Harness Racing ● Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) ● Gambling Commission ● Pokies ● Rorts ● Organised Crime ● Serious Fraud ● Political Interference

Department of Internal Affairs is a despicable excuse for a regulatory authority – corrupt (yes), criminal (question mark) and unethical (100%) DIA management, now with aid of the Buddle Findlay goof. LAUGHABLE.

SST 30.12.12 Kilgallon pA2 (2)

Link supplied.

SOFT SOAP SEEK – DIA wants two new investigators to NOT investigate
http://www.seek.co.nz/Job/12-504-investigator-x2/in/wellington-wellington-central/23689377

Thanks Hype O’Thermia!

NZ Herald – What Bob Jones said….
19.6.12 Pokies nothing to do with charity

Related Post and Comments:
25.7.12 Martin Legge backgrounds TTCF (pokie trust) and Portage and Waitakere Licensing Trusts #DIA

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

17 Comments

Filed under Business, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport

To DVML Board, from Ian Tayor [sic]

[scanned]

ODT 22.12.12 Open Letter p34downloadfile-1

.

### ODT Online Mon, 24 Dec 2012
Response to stadium letter ‘encouraging’
By John Gibb
Dunedin businessman Ian Taylor is heartened by the ”huge support” he has gained for his open letter to the Forsyth Barr Stadium’s board. In the open letter, published in Saturday’s Otago Daily Times, Mr Taylor said he had on ”numerous occasions” sought answers from the Dunedin Venues Management Ltd (DVML) board about the awarding of the stadium’s preferred supplier contract for audio services. He had since received dozens of supportive messages, and been directly approached by many people, in a ”really, really encouraging response”. Otago ratepayers had funded the stadium and it was expected ”local companies would be the first to benefit”. He was concerned the record of a company such as Strawberry Sound had been ignored and the contract awarded to an ”outside company” that did not exist before July, despite a requirement for Strawberry Sound to show it had operated for at least five years, the letter said. DVML chief executive Darren Burden said it was ”strange to say the least” Mr Taylor had complained about a ”deafening” silence from DVML.
Read more

.

ODT 29.12.12 Letters to the editor p30downloadfile-2

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

7 Comments

Filed under Business, Concerts, Design, DVML, Economics, Events, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums

‘Low-rises are great for the community and the residents’

### theglobeandmail.com Tuesday, 10 July 2012, 1:07 PM EDT
Last updated Tues, 10 July 2012, 1:15 PM EDT
Real Estate
High time for more low-rises
By Nadani Ditmars
The traditional “Vancouverist” model of a tower and podium may well be headed for a civic sea change. In the midst of controversy over proposed new towers – like the Rize Alliance development in Mount Pleasant that continues to draw significant community opposition despite being approved by council – several new “low-rise” projects are quietly making their mark on the urban landscape.

Call it the “slow-rise” revolution if you will, but the model that is gaining ground is one that evokes an earlier era and a more human scale, with uniquely contemporary design. Centred around Vancouver’s historic neighbourhoods, projects like Gastown’s Paris Annex, Chinatown’s Flats on Georgia and Mount Pleasant’s Collection 45 offer modernist architectural values that respect the surrounding built-and-social environments in a way that the city’s growing number of cookie-cutter towers do not.

Developer Robert Fung, whose six-storey Paris Annex building will be completed this summer, and has already sold out, contends that “our region needs density – it’s crucially important. But that doesn’t mean that it has to be exclusively through high-rises.” He notes that Paris, one of the densest cities in the world, achieved that density largely through the six-storey walk-up typology.

While he believes that high-rises can be designed with sensitivity to their environment, low-rises offer certain advantages, says Mr. Fung, “They increase light in an area,” he notes. “They offer a strong sense of identity and individuality, but at the same time make it easier for neighbours to get to know each other.”

Because of the low-rise’s need to be “strongly contextual to where they are,” he says, “that can often mean a higher level of design, and greater attention to detail,” noting that “our historic neighbourhoods tend to offer greater opportunities for this, as the buildings have to have a greater sense of engagement with their environment.”

He notes that some towers in the area, like the Woodwards one, tend to be “inward looking” with a lack of “street-front engagement.” Low-rises by nature have a greater engagement with the street and tend to go against the grain of the “commodity ubiquity towers” that proliferate around, say, the False Creek South area.
Street view-HASTINGS-10The Paris Annex is a conjoined fraternal twin of sorts to the next-door heritage conversion (and former HQ of Paris boot-makers) Paris Block. Both buildings, designed by architect Gair Williamson, share service core infrastructure.

“You have to walk through the old 1907 building to enter the new one,” notes Mr. Williamson. “Every day, residents are literally moving through history.”

The elegant 35-foot building of glass and steel will contain 2,500 square feet of retail on the ground floor and mezzanine, with 17 market residential units on the upper floors.

The constraints of these “character sites,” as Mr. Williamson calls them, “make them unique. When you work on a 25-foot site, you have to respond with integrity and be hyper-aware of the surrounding environment.”
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, People, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

A Christmas Tale

Thanks for copy, Anonymous!

A Christmas Tale 014v21

‘As they walked back to Duloc [Dunedin], the princess stopped struggling and began to talk with Shrek and Donkey. She wanted to know more about Lord Farquaad [Edgar].

‘Let me put it this way, Princess,’ Shrek smirked. ‘Men of Farquaad’s stature are in short supply.’

‘I don’t know,’ Donkey snickered, ‘there are those who think little of him.’

Finally, they reached the top of a small hill and there it was … Farquaad’s tall castle stood proudly on the horizon.’

From the pages of Shrek: The Complete Story, by Dreamworks Pictures.

“It’s a Farry Tale to scare the britches off even the hardiest of Ratepayers.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design

Proposed hotel – ODT graphic indicates building height

ODT 21-12-12 screenshotODT Online 21.12.12 (screenshot)

Read the article by Chris Morris:
Waterfront hotel: How big would it be?

UPDATED POST 22.12.12
Hotel/Casino/Investor updates for 41 Wharf Street:
Queenstown/Auckland Casinos (share swaps) Link to comment
Macau.com Link to comment

Related Posts:
19.12.12 Hearing for proposed hotel – competencies, conflicts of interest?
16.12.12 Proposed Dunedin Hotel #height
10.12.12 Proposed hotel, 41 Wharf St – “LEARNING FROM LAS VEGAS”
7.12.12 Proposed hotel – Truescape shenanigans
6.12.12 Dunedin Hotel – revised design
2.12.12 Roy Rogers and Trigger photographed recently at Dunedin
26.11.12 Proposed hotel, 41 Wharf Street – indicative landscape effects
20.11.12 City planner’s report recommends against consent for hotel
10.11.12 Dunedin Hotel, 41 Wharf Street (LUC 2012-212)
4.10.12 DUNEDIN: We’re short(!) but here is some UK nous…
8.9.12 Waterfront Hotel #Dunedin (Applicant names?)
7.9.12 Waterfront hotel: DCC to notify resource consent application
23.6.12 Mis(t)apprehension: website visits, not bookings?
16.5.12 Dunedin Hotel

UGLY DOESN’T COVER IT

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Media, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Hearing for proposed hotel – competencies, conflicts of interest?

Comments received.

Phil
Submitted on 2012/12/19 at 12:49 am
The consent process in New Zealand is fatally flawed by having unqualified elected officials on the hearings panels. In Europe consent hearings are presided over by qualified independent persons. The applicant has little chance of covering up a project’s shortcoming with glitter and sparkles, as is the case with this current application. The risk for bias or for conflicts of interest is also dramatically reduced to the point where it is no longer a factor in decisions. We all know, from the Mayor’s repeated media broadcasts of glee, that approval of this hotel is a foregone conclusion.

Phil
Submitted on 2012/12/19 at 12:52 am
At the very least they should be stopping Colin Weatherall from attending the City Planning consents meetings every week, to “advise” the trained planners on the best approach they should be taking on certain pending applications. No conflict of interest there, right ? Only on this Council could we have the least qualified person telling the most qualified people how to do their jobs and what conclusion to reach.

Related Posts:
16.12.12 Proposed Dunedin Hotel #height
10.12.12 Proposed hotel, 41 Wharf St – “LEARNING FROM LAS VEGAS”
7.12.12 Proposed hotel – Truescape shenanigans
6.12.12 Dunedin Hotel – revised design
2.12.12 Roy Rogers and Trigger photographed recently at Dunedin
26.11.12 Proposed hotel, 41 Wharf Street – indicative landscape effects
20.11.12 City planner’s report recommends against consent for hotel
10.11.12 Dunedin Hotel, 41 Wharf Street (LUC 2012-212)
4.10.12 DUNEDIN: We’re short(!) but here is some UK nous…
8.9.12 Waterfront Hotel #Dunedin (Applicant names?)
7.9.12 Waterfront hotel: DCC to notify resource consent application
16.5.12 Dunedin Hotel

Yesterday, chairman of the hearing committee, commissioner Weatherall reiterated that the three elected commissioners have NO conflicts of interest.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

18 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Delta hasn’t fixed Union St West after EIGHT WHOLE MONTHS

What’s really happening inside the council-owned company?

Only students, they’ll put up with anything….
The arrogance knows no bounds.

### ODT Online Mon, 17 Dec 2012
Roadworks drag on … and on …
By Debbie Porteous
Delta says it regrets any inconvenience caused by a series of problems that have resulted in roadworks on a section of a Dunedin street for the past eight months. There have been roadworks in parts of Union St since May, when a water main was damaged during work to install ultra-fast broadband under the street. Dunedin City Council-owned utility company Delta, which was contracted to do the associated roadworks on the street, claimed insurance to cover the cost of fixing the water main and reinstating the road.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, DCHL, Economics, Media, Name, People, Project management, Site, Urban design