Tag Archives: Otago Chamber of Commerce

Cadbury Site: Continue with Manufacturing and a Themed Hotel

### ODT Online Wed, 7 Jun 2017
$20m plan to save factory
By Eileen Goodwin
A bid to save the Cadbury factory in Dunedin is being unveiled today. Jim O’Malley, a Dunedin city councillor, is trying to raise $20 million to keep the factory open on a portion of the site. Mr O’Malley is working in a personal capacity; the Dunedin City Council is not involved in the bid. Mr O’Malley’s plan is to run a public share offer aimed at the general public as well as business. Before launching any share offer, Mr O’Malley has organised a two-week pledge period to gauge interest, starting today. […] Shares in Dunedin Manufacturing Holdings (DMH) would be priced at $50 if the offer goes ahead. A website has been launched – www.ownthefactory.co.nz – to register pledges. […] The plant would make the full range of New Zealand favourites, such as Jaffas and Pineapple Lumps, under licence for Mondelez International. […] Mr O’Malley’s plan differs from that of other parties because it involves acquiring part of the site and the equipment, rather than just agreeing to produce the goods.
Read more

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### ODT Online Wed, 7 Jun 2017
Themed hotel still possible: Lund
By Chris Morris
A chocolate-themed hotel could still be built at Dunedin’s Cadbury factory site, even if its backers have to share the space, a Dunedin businessman and city councillor says. The comment came yesterday from Russell Lund, one of those pushing the hotel concept, before news broke yesterday of Cr Jim O’Malley’s bid to save the factory operation, condensed on to a smaller part of the site. […] Mr Lund said the idea of sharing the site was “interesting” and not one that would necessarily kill the hotel concept. The Cadbury factory was on a “massive” site, meaning there was potentially room for a mixture of uses, including a hotel on upper floors alongside a dairy processing plant on the ground floor, he said. But before options could be considered, more detail was needed from Mondelez, he said. […] He expected to hear from Mondelez by the end of next month, but in the meantime, he would discuss the hotel concept with a group of Chinese investors due to visit Dunedin later this month.
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[click to enlarge]
280 Cumberland St, Dunedin 9016 via Google Earth

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When it comes to hotel design, Dunedin can learn from Hobart, writes businessman Russell Lund.

### ODT Online Mon, 8 May 2017
Hotel design: back to the future is where it’s at
By Russell Lund
OPINION The proposed Filleul St, Dunedin, hotel is a remnant of outmoded thinking. Nothing ever remains the same, and the winds of change are sweeping through the accommodation industry. I recently spent time in Hobart to see how it had been able to develop many of its waterfront heritage buildings into viable economic propositions, and received some valuable insights. Hobart now has a population in excess of 200,000, but it was and still is a regional city in economic decline, isolated from Australia’s major centres. Like Dunedin, it has the lowest average household income of any major Australian city, and sees a bright future in tourism based on its built heritage, natural environment and outstanding regional food and wine products. The accompanying photographs show the two hotels rated by TripAdvisor as the best and second best (of 46) hotels in Hobart. The Hotel Grand Chancellor Hobart is a rectilinear 4.5-star human filing cabinet that is described on TripAdvisor as an architectural scar on the Hobart cityscape. Its level of discernible architectural merit is of a similar standard to the proposed Filleul St hotel which is to say, none at all. Despite its brutal urban demeanor, The Hotel Grand Chancellor is a busy hotel. Its 244 rooms run at an impressive 93% occupancy, but you can hire a room there at any time for less than $A200 ($NZ215). However, the modest Henry Jones Art Hotel nearby, with 52 5-star rooms, a former jam factory, knocks the Grand Chancellor for a revenue six. It also runs at 90%. occupancy, but its average tariff is about double the Grand Chancellor’s, at $A350-$A500 per night. The Henry Jones is able to charge this premium because the property is unique, even in a city renowned for its building heritage.
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### ODT Online Wed, 17 May 2017
Cadbury expands Hobart factory
Mondelez International is investing $A4 million in Hobart’s Cadbury chocolate factory while pushing ahead with plans to close its Dunedin production line. The food giant announced today the money would buy new equipment to produce two new lines at the Claremont plant, while the southern New Zealand site is due to close in 2018.
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█ For more, enter the term *cadbury* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

57 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, COC (Otago), Construction, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Heritage, Hotel, Infrastructure, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Pet projects, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Structural engineering, Technology, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Harbourside: Official information request to Dunedin City Council

Note: LGOIMA official information requests can be emailed direct to officialinformation @dcc.govt.nz

DCC Webmap - Upper Harbour Central Dunedin JanFeb 2013DCC Webmap – Upper Harbour Central Dunedin JanFeb 2013

From: Elizabeth Kerr
Sent: Monday, 7 September 2015 2:30 p.m.
To: Sandy Graham [DCC]
Cc: Elizabeth Kerr; Grace Ockwell [DCC]; Sue Bidrose [DCC]
Subject: LGOIMA Information Request

Dear Sandy

Re: Urban Design and Envisioning for Dunedin Harbourside

I note the following media items:

● ODT (19.8.15) Cull to push for more city hotels [hotel accommodation]
● ODT (20.8.15) Under-fire Cull stands by comments [hotel accommodation]
● ODT (26.8.15) – A Mackay, Opinion Harbourside development adds vibrancy
● ODT (31.8.15) – P Entwisle, Opinion Extraordinary works inspired by nature [Van Brandenburg]
● ODT (5.9.15) Waterfront the next big thing? [bridge, aquarium, ORC headquarters, hotels etc]
● ODT (5.9.15) Harbourside views in conflict
● ODT (5.9.15) ORC denies hindering development
● ODT (7.9.15) Vogel Street Party spreads its wings [Van Brandenburg ‘hotel’ model]
● ODT (7.9.15) Conferences ‘great’ boost for city

●● DCC media release (27.8.15) Building stronger local government connections with China

●● Indications are that DCC wants Otago Rowing Club to relocate from their premises to a site of the DCC’s choosing.

I wish to formally request ALL reports and visionary/guiding documents and or statements/statements of proposal or intent that are currently being used by Dunedin City Council in consultation with other parties (real and potential – local, national and international) be they:

focus groups, steering groups, working parties, development partners, surveyors, designers/architects, resource management specialists, investors, project facilitators, project managers, University of Otago, Otago Polytechnic, Otago Chamber of Commerce and or other – to ‘shape and envision’ the future development of Dunedin Harbourside in the urban area that extends from:

Otago Boat Harbour and its vicinity (includes Industrial 1 zone, Stadium zone, Port 2 zone) to the area zoned for mixed use south of Dunedin’s Steamer Basin (Harbourside zone) and further south to Portsmouth Drive (Industrial 1 zone); including connections to existing precincts TH12, TH13, TH05, TH04, TH03 and TH02.

Any corresponding information and explanation that derives from the, to be publicly notified (this month?), second generation plan (2GP) for these city blocks and foreshore area is also requested.

I look forward to prompt receipt of all available information in electronic format.

Regards

Elizabeth Kerr
[Dunedin North]

——————

From: Sandy Graham [DCC]
Sent: Monday, 7 September 2015 2:42 p.m.
To: Elizabeth Kerr
Cc: Grace Ockwell [DCC]; Sue Bidrose [DCC]
Subject: RE: LGOIMA Information Request

Dear Elizabeth

Thanks for your very detailed LGOIMA request which I have forwarded to the officialinformation @dcc.govt.nz. Your request will be processed under the terms of LGOIMA and a response will be provided as soon as practicable but in any event within 20 working days.

Regards
Sandy

[DCC Group Manager Corporate Services]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr
[it’s OK, not holding my breath for too much public disclosure]

26 Comments

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Esco —‘just the global hardball player we always were’, sorry staff….

Esco Dunedin was among a group of neighbouring businesses objecting to Russell Lund’s plans to redevelop the 142 year old Loan and Mercantile building, citing reverse sensitivity concerns, including over noise. The outcome of Environment Court mediation talks was yet to be revealed, but Mr Kershaw said the issue played no part in the company’s decision. (ODT)

### ODT Online Wed, 2 Sep 2015
Foundry closure ‘a blow’
By Chris Morris
Australia’s mining downturn is set to deliver a “real blow” to Dunedin’s economy with the closure of the Esco foundry and the loss of dozens of jobs. Staff at Esco Dunedin were told yesterday the foundry would close by the end of the year, with the loss of 34 jobs. Esco products division president Jeff Kershaw, of Portland, in the United States, said in a statement the decision reflected a downturn in Australia’s mining industry that showed no sign of letting up.
Read more

TWO THINGS

█ Remember when Esco pushed this button (highlighted) at the NZ Loan and Mercantile Building resource consent hearing:

ODT Online 20.8.14 'Demolition threatened; job loss possibility raised' [screenshot] 1
ODT Online [screenshot]

█ From file records, see Russell Lund’s percipient closing to hearing:

[para] 102. The biggest hurdle would seem to be the decline of the Australian coal mining industry. I refer to a Guardian article May 5, 2014 Australian Coalmining entering structural decline.

116. Esco have a large foundry operation in China. They employ 675 people in China.

117. I am very sure the production costs of Esco’s Chinese foundries are markedly less than in Dunedin, Portland or anywhere else. That is the ticking clock for the Dunedin foundry, and other Esco foundries.

118. The bottom line is that Esco will operate this small Dunedin foundry only as long as it serves their shareholders’ interests. If the market conditions dictate that consolidation is required and it is surplus to requirements, then they will act swiftly, as they did in Brisbane.

LUC-2014-259 RV Lund Applicant Right of Reply 22.9.14
(PDF, 6 MB)

Related Posts and Comments:
6.8.15 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building —meeting tomorrow
13.3.15 Making heritage work | Dunedin New Zealand
7.1.15 Industrial Heritage Save: Cowes Hammerhead crane
28.11.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building —Resource Consent granted
26.11.14 Retraction (see comment on ‘Heritage Counts’)
● 26.9.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building —what ESCO said!
30.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building: Looking round at potential
18.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building #randomsmartphonepix (interiors)
17.8.14 Public Notices: NZ Loan and Mercantile Building… (site tour, hearing)
13.8.14 Chamber’s Own Goals —Heritage (letters)
11.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building (audio)
8.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Agency Co Ltd Building…
18.3.14 Dunedin Harbourside: English Heritage on portside development
21.10.13 Harbourside: Access to a revamped Steamer Basin has public backing
16.3.10 Public meeting: planning the future of Dunedin heritage buildings
24.10.09 Rodney Wilson: Dunedin as national heritage city

█ For more, enter the terms *loan and mercantile*, *heritage*, *bradken* or *harbourside* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

8 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

NZ Loan and Mercantile Building —meeting tomorrow

IMG_5604a11bw12a

“You can’t be too confident, but if we’re all reasonable I think an agreement is definitely within reach.” –Russell Lund

Farra Engineering chief executive John Whitaker agreed yesterday when contacted there had been “good work” during mediation.

### ODT Online Thu, 6 Aug 2015
Extra conditions may rescue project
By Chris Morris
Plans to breathe new life into Dunedin’s historic Loan and Mercantile building could be about to take a significant step forward. Building owner Russell Lund will meet a group of neighbouring harbourside businesses, as well as Dunedin City Council and Otago Chamber of Commerce representatives, tomorrow to discuss the stalled project.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
13.3.15 Making heritage work | Dunedin New Zealand
28.11.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building —Resource Consent granted (pics)
26.11.14 Retraction (see comment on ‘Heritage Counts’)
26.9.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building —what ESCO said!
30.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building: Looking round at potential
18.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building #randomsmartphonepix (interiors)
17.8.14 Public Notices: NZ Loan and Mercantile Building… (site tour, hearing)
13.8.14 Chamber’s Own Goals —Heritage (letters)
11.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Building (audio)
8.8.14 NZ Loan and Mercantile Agency Co Ltd Building…
18.3.14 Dunedin Harbourside: English Heritage on portside development
21.10.13 Harbourside: Access to a revamped Steamer Basin has public backing
24.10.09 Rodney Wilson: Dunedin as national heritage city

█ For more, enter the terms *harbourside*, *heritage* or *lund* in the search box at right.

[click image to enlarge]

Post/image by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

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DCC SLOWLY waking up to small business #StaggeringLethargy

A key initiative – likely to be in place within three months – was the creation of case managers, who would be the main point of contact for small business owners and guide them through the process of dealing with different council departments. (via ODT)

Ha Ha Ha
Case managers? Where have we heard this before?
Oh right, DCC. Long before Simon Pickford arrived on the scene.
Why have ‘case managers’, mooted long ago, not been in evidence and used more widely throughout the dreadfully over-paid-over-staffed halls of local government?

DISREPUTABLE COUNCIL SILOS; DEFERENCE TO SOME PROPERTY DEVELOPERS, UNIVERSITY, PROFESSIONAL RUGBY, CYCLING LOBBY ET AL; BUSINESS BLINDNESS IN THE EXTREME AT DCC

### ODT Online Tue, 14 Apr 2015
Cutting through council bureaucracy
By Vaughan Elder
A Dunedin woman says her experience with the Dunedin City Council’s building department had her on the verge of giving up her dream of setting up a men’s hairdressing business. […] Now, the city council is using her experience to improve the way it deals with small businesses. Ms O’Connor first found out the council was interested in learning from her experience during an undercover visit to her salon, Bloke, from council services and development general manager Simon Pickford.
Read more

Small Business [businessnz.org.nz]Image: businessnz.org.nz

Link received from Hype O’Thermia
Wed, 8 Apr 2015 at 1:04 a.m.

CBD, RETAIL & PARKING

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00, April 5 2015
Industries
Tech weapons to save the high street
By Catherine Harris
Ask Chris Wilkinson what makes a good retailer and he’ll say there’s no mystery to it. A retailer is like a maitre’d. “They don’t necessarily need to know how to cook the meal but they do need to know how to look after people, make sure the whole operation runs properly, understand finances, understand buying. It is very much a people-oriented thing.” Those are the basics, but in an industry full of store “resizing,” online competition and new technology, the average retailer could easily be forgiven for being confused.

Enter Wilkinson’s consultancy firm, First Retail Group, which aims to “build performance, develop opportunity and manage risk”. […] First Retail Group spans a wide range of sectors and a number of countries including Australia and Scotland. In particular, it helps towns figure out how to breathe fresh life into their retail hearts.

Parking regularly crops up as an issue, as does getting the right mix of stores “so they don’t lose their mojo”. “Townships need to rebuild goodwill with their consumers . . and a lot of it starts with parking,” says Wilkinson.

“The biggest challenge is that towns are typically earning some pretty good money off their parking and it costs them a lot to maintain that infrastructure. So it’s not easy for them to walk away from it. We always challenge stakeholders and some of the community leaders to find ways of replacing that revenue.”

There’s also a growing concern about the “sameness” of main streets and malls, as big-box retailers pop up seemingly in every town. The future is “differentiation,” says Wilkinson. New types of retailers, flexible store fit-outs and layouts, atmospheric lighting. “It really is all about theatre.”

He also advises towns to think of themselves like malls. In Queenstown, for instance, jetlagged Australians are getting off the plane and finding the stores closed at 6pm.

“That’s no longer suitable so we need to start getting some changing behaviours from the retailers. We need to get the restaurants and the retailers working much closer together, and we need them to work very hard on developing an artisan sector, because walking down the street of a place like Queenstown, you will find it no different than walking down a street in Melbourne or Sydney or Auckland.”

However, he doubts a retro move back to boutique shops is on the cards, given the cost of business. “What we’d probably see happening with artisan retailers is more developments like [Auckland’s] Ponsonby Central, where you have a collective of flexible sites with strong emphasis on food and beverage and almost mini-community that they’ve built.”
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
12.4.15 Mosgiel pool trust calls on Dunedin ratepayers to fund distant complex
10.4.15 DCC cycleways propaganda continues #SpendSpendSpend

● 4.4.15 Hamilton is here, DUD
“For the city centre [Hamilton] to be successful it must be commercially and economically successful and over the last few decades most reports have focused on physical changes, so we have started with an economic analysis and looked at the trend since 2001 in terms of the economy.” (Stuff 4.4.15)

28.3.15 DCC: DRAFT Long Term Plan 2015/16 to 2024/25 —CONSULTATION
24.3.15 Noble property subdivision —DELTA
23.3.15 Noble property subdivision: “Denials suggest that we have not learned.”
20.3.15 DCC Shame: First, John Wilson Dr … now Portobello Rd cycleway
21.1.15 Dunedin City Council to set rates WAY ABOVE….
5.1.15 DCC: Chairman denies true and correct Council record
22.12.14 Auckland Council: Hark to DCC’s well-tried model of corporate welfare
18.12.14 DCC: Deloitte report released on Citifleet #whitewash
21.11.14 Stadium Review: Mayor Cull exposed
19.11.14 Forsyth Barr Stadium Review
11.11.14 Dunedin’s draft local alcohol policy (Lap) —submissions, real story outs
7.11.14 Daaave develops a blood nose
31.10.14 Octagon … DCC pointy heads actually care about small businesses?
21.10.14 DCC adds staff positions, significant ratepayer cost
8.10.14 Stadium: Liability Cull warns ratepayers could pay more to DVML
3.10.14 DCC: Octagon entrée to more spending
28.9.14 “DCC entitlement” about to ramrod change at CBD #manipulation
5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact ratepayers …
21.4.14 Dunedin economic development strategy — low flying Year 1
27.1.13 Sunday Star Times Business News: Woops DCC
31.10.12 Cull’s council takes business away from retailers
5.5.12 Dunedin and the southern region’s business future

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

5 Comments

Filed under Business, Citifleet, DCC, Democracy, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, People, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Whaleoil on “dodgy ratbag local body politicians” —just like ours at DCC

Whale Oil Beef Hooked logo### whaleoil.co.nz Fri, 31 Oct 2014 at 5:20pm
Why is there no law to rein in dodgy ratbag local body politicians?
By Cameron Slater
Former ARC Councillor Bill Burrill is not the first dodgy ratbag Councillor to trough from abuses of power to his own pecuniary advantage in recent years. A few years back in 2009 Council Watch was calling for a number of Councillors from the Canterbury Regional Council to be prosecuted and sacked from their positions after an investigation by the Auditor General Lyn Provost found that four individuals had broken the law by acting in conflict with their official role. Back then those Canterbury Councillors failed to declare a conflict on interest that [led] to a financial benefit for themselves by participating in discussion and voting on proposals before Council. Under investigation the Auditor General’s office chose not to prosecute stating that whilst the Councillors should have withdrawn as a matter of principle – they had each received and shared legal advice that they could participate. And here in lies the problem. The Auditor General and Office of the Ombudsmen publish clear guidelines for Councillors and council staff but the reality is that the law is erroneously filled with holes that are exploited and there is precious little oversight of Local Government leading to the Auditor General loathing to bother and the Courts uninterested.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

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DCC adds staff positions, significant ratepayer cost

Two permanent full-time project co-ordinators to run the Project China and Export Education Uplift initiatives.

### ODT Online Tue, 21 Oct 2014
Vandervis takes aim over funding request
By Chris Morris
There were heated exchanges between Dunedin city councillors as a debate over an economic development funding request turned into a spat yesterday. The dust-up came as councillors considered a request from the Grow Dunedin Partnership to use $190,000 a year from existing council budgets to pay staff salaries for two projects during the next three years.
Read more

Report – EDC – 20/10/2014 (PDF, 126.7 KB)
Economic Development Strategy Projects Budget – Project Co-ordinators’ Funding Request

From the report…

Enterprise Dunedin’s EDS projects budget is $518,000 for the current 2014/2015 financial year and has yet to be ratified for the 2015/16 year and future years. This budget pays for progressing EDS projects and includes payment for the project co-ordinators and project management costs.

RECOMMENDATIONS
That the Committee:

1. Approve the earmarking of $190,000 on an annual basis from the Economic Development Project Budget for the purpose of employing two project co-ordinators.

2. That this funding be included as two line items within the Economic Development Project fund for a period of three years:
- Export Education Uplift Co-ordinator – $95,000
- Project China Co-ordinator – $95,000

Dunedin Economic Development Strategy 2013-2023BACKGROUND
Dunedin’s Economic Development Strategy (EDS) was adopted in 2013 by its six partners. There are two specific economic goals:

1. 10,000 extra jobs over 10 years (requiring employment growth of approximately 2% per annum.

2. An average of $10,000 extra income for each person (requiring GDP per capita to rise by about 2.5% per annum).

. . .

The Strategy is built around five themes:
1. Business vitality
2. Alliances for innovation
3. A hub of skills and talent
4. Linkages beyond our borders
5. A compelling destination

Related Posts and Comments:
14.8.14 Mayor Cull’s reflections on Edinburgh #SisterCity #Junkets
21.4.14 Dunedin economic development strategy — low flying Year 1
15.3.13 Dunedin showcase (election year tripe): economic development strategy
19.6.12 DRAFT Dunedin Economic Development Strategy
31.5.12 Public Forum: Dunedin’s DRAFT Economic Development Strategy

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

14 Comments

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