NZ Banks creaming it overnight ?

Received from Gurglars
23/05/2016 4:13 am (GMT+12:00)

Subject: Banks Theft

I have sent this letter to my bank.
This type of arrogant theft by banks must be exposed and stopped! The stock exchange has recently shortened settlement days from 3 to 2 for this very reason! In some cases over the weekend banks can make 50% on overnight money markets, so they use YOUR and MY money to make huge profits whilst charging us interest on outstanding debts that could be amortised.

A sum of $***** was deposited to my account Saturday. At the latest it should be in my account Monday morning! Given the nature of internet transactions, the keeping of MY money for two days is in fact an act of theft. The monies have left the sender’s account and not been lodged in my account and therefore the bank has claimed some ownership of the money for two days when the bank is trading. This “theft” which could be presumed legal when banks had to have time to clear funds is no longer a “legal” action!

[ends]

My quick reply:

Excellent point. Yes they reap at our cost, bare-faced. Some banks over others have difficulty moving to processing 24/7…. more ‘instantaneously’. From discussion with colleagues, it appears ANZ has recently moved to “next morning” (including paying in on Saturdays) for deposits made after 10pm on Friday nights —which previously had a dogged (clip-ticket) wait until “after 10pm Monday” for transaction. Some shift has occurred(?).
Consumers need to stack on the pressure.
The Banking Ombudsman needs to investigate – the public should send letters their way.

New Zealand’s Banking Ombudsman Scheme
The Banking Ombudsman Scheme investigates and resolves disputes between customers and their banks. We are independent of scheme participants, customers, and government. Our service is free of charge and easy to use.
https://bankomb.org.nz/

### radionz.co.nz Tue 24 May 2016 7:00 am today
Morning Report with Guyon Espiner & Susie Ferguson
Reserve Bank keeping an eye on digital disruption on banking
The Reserve Bank is monitoring the impact of digital disruption on the banking sector, as a rapidly increasing number of unregulated players have the potential to undermine the existing financial system.
Audio | Download: Ogg  MP3 (2′07″)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Bank toon-3228 [glasbergen.com] 1[glasbergen.com]

3 Comments

Filed under Business, Democracy, Economics, Finance, Media, New Zealand, Ombudsman, People, Public interest

DCC stormwater drainage fails again #Dunedin (today!)

Jeff Dickie 20160523_085845Jeff Dickie 20160523_085800Jeff Dickie 20160523_085755Jeff Dickie 20160523_085738

Received from Jeff Dickie
23/05/2016 2:31 pm (GMT+12:00)

Subject: DCC DRAINAGE FAILS AGAIN

This is what flooding looked like at 3 Malvern St, Woodhaugh at 9.00am today. Residents were unable to access the property or easily vacate it for that matter. As with June 3 1915, flooding in this area was caused by a blocked mudtank. However, the mudtank itself is so far below specification that even when cleared it is not able to cope.

This was hardly a one in a 100-year rain event! This has consistently caused property damage and huge inconvenience.

The DCC has continually failed to attend to core business such as this. The mayor and council have been distracted with trivia, such as frivolous trips overseas, failed expensive projects such as cycleways and financially disastrous failed Delta property ventures.

The complete failure of such a basic core service as drainage is symptomatic of an administration and a mayoralty [not coping…] to the core! 

{Moderated. -Eds}

DCC Webmap - 3 Malvern St, Dunedin JanFeb 2013DCC Webmap – 3 Malvern St, Dunedin JanFeb 2013 [click to enlarge]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

59 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Geography, Housing, Infrastructure, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Town planning, Transportation

Johnstone review of 2nd DCC report #SouthDunedinFlood

DCC publications:

● 30 Nov 2015 (McElhone)
Infrastructure Performance During June 2015 Flood Event | Meeting Video

● 20 Apr 2016 (Media Release)
Report on South Dunedin infrastructure performance during June 2015 flood released

● 26 Apr 2016 Agenda (and reports) Infrastructure Services Committee
Item 5 (Stokes, pp 6-27) South Dunedin Public Infrastructure Performance during June 2015 Flood Event Follow up | Meeting Video not available

Received: 18 May 2016 [full text]

An Independent Review of DCC Report : ‘South Dunedin Public Infrastructure Performance during June 2015 Flood Event Follow up’

By N. P. Johnstone, MIPENZ

1. This review complements my peer review of DCC’s first flood report, published in November 2015. This review assesses the content of the second report (described henceforth as “the report”) published in late April 2016, and contextual statements made elsewhere by DCC staff and elected members. The author of the report is Ms R. Stokes. The technical qualifications and relevant experience of the report’s author are not stated.

2. I consider that there is a need for such a review for reasons of historical accuracy and context, the identification of solutions (which can only be achieved be if the problem is understood and acknowledged) and – most importantly – to provide a considered assessment of what South Dunedin’s current flood risk really is, noting that two events (of which only the recent one caused major inundation) in five decades does not suggest a current flood risk much different from that existing in many other established New Zealand communities, despite some landuse changes. It is emphasised that the flood had nothing to do with climate change, nor therefore does this review. The failure to understand the issues may lead to inaction or to inappropriate and expensive actions.

3. This review may be criticised for being repetitive on some issues, but the repetition is at least partly driven by the number of times challengeable information on the flood event and its causes has been circulated by DCC. In many respects, the report under review could be seen as a concentration of such challengeable information. The report is solely based on my research, knowledge and experience; any errors are therefore mine, but hopefully, few.

4. This review has led to the following conclusions:
4.1 Council’s continued insistence that the June 2015 rainfall event was the largest since 1923 remains erroneous;
4.2 Pre-existing groundwater levels were unexceptional, and had no impact on the flooding, contrary to claims made in the report, previously and subsequently;
4.3 South Dunedin does not have a significant imminent exposure to stormwater flooding. This finding is based on the original design parameters, historical performance, an absence of groundwater issues, and provided existing infrastructure is properly maintained, monitored and operated;
4.4 Problems at the Portobello Road Pumping Station caused elevated flood levels and prolonged the period of inundation, but the report acknowledges only the latter;
4.5 Similarly, the now-admitted failures to ensure that mudtanks were properly maintained impacted adversely on flood levels attained in some locations at least, and prolonged the period of inundation in many areas;
4.6 Comparisons with the 1968 flood event can be instructive in assessing the impact of Council failures in 2015 in terms of water level, disruption and cost. The report fails to make such assessments.

5. My review of the first report, written by Ms L. McElhone, was driven by DCC claims that the prime causes of the flood were high sea and ground water levels, a 150-year, then a 100-year, then a 63-year (and incidentally and extraordinarily now again a 100-year*) rainfall event, and confirmed that Portobello Road pumping station issues added not less than 200mm to peak flood levels. That review also demonstrated that the rainfall event of March 1968 was demonstrably larger than that of June 2015, but caused much less damage, and that land use changes added up to 150mm to flood levels (based on DCC’s unconfirmed data on impermeable areas). Any consented landuse changes should, in my opinion, have been compensated for in past years with additional infrastructure to maintain drainage standards and South Dunedin’s protection standards.
(*Ms Stokes to John Campbell on Checkpoint, 21 April 2016).

6. Exaggerated assessments of both the historical significance of the 2015 rainfalls and groundwater levels, and the absence of mudtank information originally helped DCC promote its position of zero liability. The mudtank maintenance failures are at last largely revealed in the new report; significant mudtank maintenance issues were previously reported by Cr Lee Vandervis as early as 2014, but were seemingly largely ignored by DCC. Paragraph 37 of the report which reads: “Mudtank maintenance and performance in general has been the subject of focus for a number of years”, appears vague, and therefore requires elaboration. The statement, if accurate makes the failures more disturbing. There is still some unfortunate reliance on the groundwater myth (paragraphs 2 & 32), and to the underestimation of the 1968 event (paragraph 20). There appear to be newly-entrenched positions at DCC that the existing stormwater system is inadequate, presumably based on the report’s paragraphs 23-27, and reinforced in recent public statements from Ms Stokes and Mayor Cull, that the flood would have occurred (or that a serious flood would have occurred) even if the current system including the mudtanks had operated at optimum. This review strongly disputes such claims, and uses the well-documented event of March 1968 as a very useful “model” for key comparisons between a contained flood (1968) and a disaster (2015).

7. The general understanding was that DCC’s second review was to concentrate in detail on the performance of mudtanks, and was to be peer reviewed. Detailed reporting and peer review processes were understood to be the reason for the extraordinary delays in publication. In reality, only paragraphs 33-61 deal with mudtanks issues and no peer review is included. It is noted that Mayor Cull confirmed to John Campbell on Radio NZ’s Checkpoint programme (22 April 2016) that peer reviews of the report had been produced. The peer review(s) could usefully have been attached to the report; failing that, the report’s author should have explained their absence. Continue reading

11 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Housing, Infrastructure, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, South Dunedin, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, Urban design

Measuring sea level at Dunedin #DUD

pole - Bibi Calderaro, minus space 8 [minusspace.com]

Received.
Wed, 18 May 2016 at 9:34 a.m.

Le Comte Rollande de Gurgelars VC and Bar, Croix de G.U.R, Medaille d’or called the meeting to order Wednesday the 18th May.

Please provide the names’

Rollande!
Jacqueline
Aaron

Merci!

Thees is de first meeting of the International Measuring committe for zee analysis of zee sealevel in Otago Harbour and possibly South Dunedin. Therfore there are no minutes and no matters arising!

Correspondence:
We have received a stern letter from “Cull the Mayor” advising that he will be appointed chairman of the committtee on his advice.

What should be our response?
Aaron- “Tell him to piss off”
Jacqueline, a frenchwoman:- We have been appointed by a joint International consortium contaIning a large number of scientific orgamisations including The UN and the Nobel committee!
Rollande- Well thank you, I told him that the meeting was yesterday and gave the GPS readings as ten miles off the Chatham coast, I believe it is called le Chatham Rise.

Have you heard from “Cull de Mare” ?

Non!

Sacre Bleu, he may be gone!

Aaron- Amen!

New Business:
Le Comte -We have identified a strategem!

We have seconded a fisherman at le Port Chalmers and a well known resident of Otakou as our scrutineers to daily take le sophisticated measuring devices to zee sea at two fixed places not to be advised due to possible sabotage’ by persons unknown of Le Octagon.

Vee have also purchased two sets of our sophisticated measuring devices to transport under secret at the dead of night to the scrutineers.

Aaron. Can we view the devices and be show zee workings?
Le Comte’s eyes narrowed slightly.

Jacqueline softened the mood by quickly asking “Have vee kept within the budget?”

Le Comte advised- Le Budget is £2 or $NZ – approximately $NZ4

Jacqueline- So are we within cooee? (Jacqueline spent some time in Sydney)

Le Comte- “Whilst this is a commercially sensitive number, I can advise that we are well within budget, but keep it to yourself, it might embarrass the Octagon, Staff’s heads might roll.

Zo, M’sieur, are we able to inspect zee sophisticated measuring devices. asked Jacqueline archly?

M’sieur Le Comte stood and walked behind the curtain reappearing with le devices.

Jacqueline exclaimed “Le Stick!!!”

Oui- Le Stick! Cut from a sycamore nearby, so sustainable which should bring down huge praises from le Jinty.

le Comte announces- We will meet again next week to determine our stragedy with special attention to tidal matters. I will advise “Cull the Mayor” as to the GPS numbers, but they will probably be someway west of Milford Sound, if the Homer tunnel is closed.

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

pole  [flickr.com] 1

*Images: (top) minusspace.com – Bibi Calderaro, minus space 8 | flickr.com – untitled, girl with pole, tweaked by whatifdunedin

31 Comments

Filed under Business, Climate change, Democracy, Dunedin, Events, Geography, Name, New Zealand, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Public interest

Boris J knows Exactly how New Zealand came to this #KeyGovernment

“The whole EU system of regulation is so remote and opaque that the super-rich are able to use it to their advantage, to maintain their oligarchic position.”

### telegraph.co.uk 15 May 2016 • 9:20pm
Of course our City fat cats love the EU – it’s why they earn so much
By Boris Johnson
At last year’s Tory Party conference I drew attention to a worrying statistic about the way our society is changing. It is the number of times the salary of the average FTSE100 top executive exceeds that of the average – the average – employee in that company. This multiple appears to be taking off, at an extraordinary, inexplicable and frankly nostril-wrinkling rate.
Plato said no one should earn more than five times anyone else. Well, Plato would have been amazed by the growth in corporate inequality today. In 1980 the multiple was 25. By 1998 it had risen to 47. After 10 years of Tony Blair and Peter Mandelson – and their “intensely relaxed” attitude to getting “filthy rich” – the top executives of big UK firms were earning 120 times the average pay of the shop floor. Last year it was 130 times.
This year – cue a fusillade of champagne corks – the fat cats have broken through the magic 150 barrier. The average FTSE100 CEO is taking home 150 times as much as his or her average employee – and in some cases far more. Let us make no bones about it: these people have so much more money than other people in the same company that they are flying in private jets and building subterranean swimming pools, while many of their employees cannot afford to buy any kind of home at all.
Read more

Boris Johnson [theguardian.com] 1Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson (b. 19 Jun 1964) is an English politician, popular historian, and journalist who has served as Member of Parliament (MP) for Uxbridge and South Ruislip since 2015. Johnson previously served as the MP for Henley from 2001 until 2008, and as Mayor of London from 2008 to 2016. A member of the Conservative Party, Johnson considers himself a One Nation Conservative and has been described as a libertarian due to his association with both economically liberal and socially liberal policies. Born in New York City to upper-class English parents, Johnson was educated at the European School of Brussels, Ashdown House School, and Eton College. He studied Classics at Balliol College, Oxford, where he was elected President of the Oxford Union in 1986. Beginning his career in journalism at The Times, he later became The Daily Telegraph’s Brussels correspondent, with his articles exerting a strong influence on growing Eurosceptic sentiment among the British right-wing.

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 11:22, May 16 2016
Labour leader Andrew Little: PM ‘out of touch’ with families in hardship
By Rosanna Price
Prime Minister John Key has advised families living in garages or in cars to go and see Work and Income. But Labour leader Andrew Little has called that advice “impractical”, saying Key is “out of touch” with these New Zealanders in hardship. Key’s comments come after social housing groups and community workers have called on the government to increase their supply of affordable housing. There have been reports families in Auckland have been forced to rent garages and shipping containers, with the Salvation Army estimating one in ten Auckland garages is used as a home. Social agencies say the number of families living out of their cars has increased.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: theguardian.com – Boris Johnson

39 Comments

Filed under Baloney, Business, Construction, Democracy, Design, Economics, Finance, Geography, Heritage, Housing, Infrastructure, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Travesty, What stadium

Fire Safety at Home : Install long-life photoelectric alarms #bestprotection

Smoke-Alarms-Banner [fire.org.nz]

NEW ZEALAND FIRE SERVICE
We recommend you install long-life photoelectric type smoke alarms in your home. They may cost a little more but the benefits are significant.
• They provide a about 10 years smoke detection.
• They remove the frustration of fixing the ‘flat battery beep’ at inconvenient times such as at 3 in the morning.
• The cost of replacement batteries for standard alarms means the long-life one effectively pays for itself over its lifetime.
• You don’t have to climb ladders every year to replace batteries.

Your best protection is to have photoelectric smoke alarms in every bedroom, living area and hallway in your home. Install them in the middle of the ceiling of each room.

But, at a minimum, you should install one standard long-life photoelectric type alarm in the hallway closest to the bedrooms.

NZFS : Make Your Home and Family Fire Safe Brochure

NZFS : More on smoke alarm installation

Explanation

SMOKE ALARMS : TYPES
There are 2 main types of smoke alarm available – ionisation and photoelectric:

Ionisation alarms
Ionisation alarms monitor ions or electrically charged particles in the air. Smoke particles enter the sensing chamber changing the electrical balance of the air. The alarm will sound when the change in the electrical balance reaches a certain level.

Photoelectric alarms (recommended)
Photoelectric alarms have a sensing chamber which uses a beam of light and a light sensor. Smoke particles entering the chamber change the amount of light that reaches the sensor. The alarm sounds when the smoke density reaches a preset level.

Our recommendation for your home
We recommend that you install photoelectric smoke alarms as they provide more effective all-round detection and alarm in all types of fire scenarios and are more likely to alert occupants in time to escape safely.

█ If your home currently only has ionisation alarms installed we recommend that you also install some photoelectric alarms.

Smoke alarms for hearing-impaired
Smoke alarms are available for people with hearing loss. These alarms have extra features such as extra loud and/or lower pitch alarm sounds, flashing strobe lights, or vibrating devices.
Find out more about these alarms and where you can buy them

Australasian standards for smoke alarms
The Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC) is the representative body in the Australasian region for fire, emergency services, and land management agencies.
Read the AFAC position on smoke alarms for residential accommodation

WHERE TO BUY : Consumer Test (PDF)
Silent Death : Smoke is toxic – and breathing it can kill. So you need an alarm that gives you early warning and more time to escape.

Fire damaged property - window escape route [stuff.co.nz]Fire damage: 660 Castle St, Dunedin – window escape route [stuff.co.nz]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: fire.org.nz – smoke alarms banner

9 Comments

Filed under Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Events, Heritage, Housing, Media, New Zealand, NZFS, People, Police, Property, Public interest, Site, University of Otago

1 3 th

13 - Another Claustrophobic Horror Title Is Coming In The Way Of Lithium - Inmate 39 [aggrogamer.com] 11

PlayStation Game Trailer Published on Mar 31, 2016
Lithium: Inmate 39 – Gameplay Trailer | PS4
Lithium Inmate 39 is a platform and 3D puzzle game for horror genre. It tells the story of a psychiatric patient who must find the way back to his origins, discovering his past and getting explanations to understanding what is going on in his mind. As the game story develops, players need to overcome hundreds of perils, traps and puzzles throughout the 7 different chapters of the game. Traumatic past memories from the Inmate 39 will take form on different and uneasing enemies. Each chapter is inspired and set on Inmate’s 39 vision of his world, the paths that will take him to knowing his truth. Different cutscenes will lead the players to getting their own conclusions. Understanding will get clear at later stages.

Rated Mature: Intense Violence, Gore and Blood, Suggestive themes

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: aggrogamer.com – Another Claustrophobic Horror Title Is Coming In The Way Of Lithium – Inmate 39

9 Comments

Filed under Public interest, Site