Monthly Archives: March 2010

File note: stadium infomercial in ODT today

Joy! A two-page spread.

The companies associated with the stadium build, nine months into construction, are telling us it’s “On track for 2011”.

Take their word over Malcolm Farry’s. Malcolm and the Mayor are still tightening nuts. FuBarr is also raising its head in the mentions.

The companies:

Acoustic Engineering Services
Anderson Lloyd
Arrow International
Beca
Brazier Scaffolding
Concretec
Delta Utility Services
Fletcher Reinforcing
Hawkins Construction
Paterson Pitts Partners
Populous
Sports Surface Design & Management
Stahlton Engineered Concrete
Stresscrete Southland
The Model Workshop
Tonkin & Taylor

You might’ve also tripped over the Rugby World Cup 2011 icing appearing either side of the stadium spread.

Luckily, a newspaper can’t blast you with the Jesus Jones ‘Right Here, Right Now’ (1991) single, newly announced as the cup’s ticketing campaign song. Such a lacklustre Feelers version; it’s beginning to saturate free-to-air television ad slots. When will the cup ‘anthem’ be announced?

Our very own rugby stadium. Er, times two.
Carisbrook RIP

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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RWC trains: corporate travel or rowdyism?

### ODT Online Wed, 31 Mar 2010
World Cup train option between Christchurch, Dunedin
By Mark Price
Rugby fans could have the option of travelling by train between Dunedin and Christchurch during the Rugby World Cup next year. KiwiRail communications manager Nigel Parry confirmed yesterday the company was considering running special trains to matches in both cities.
Read more

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SH88 realignment

### ODT Online Wed, 31 Mar 2010
Land deal for SH88 realignment nears completion
By David Loughrey
Negotiations over land needed for the realignment of State Highway 88 past the Forsyth Barr Stadium in Dunedin are “fairly close” to completion, Dunedin City Council property manager Robert Clark says. There appears to be only one party still to sign, after Mr Clark said some negotiations had been resolved.
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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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DScene choses to profile one building owner, why? Squeaky wheel gets the oil, why?

This week’s headlines hint at a positive “discussion”… but obviously, no changes to the Dunedin City District Plan can be about one building owner. In the meantime, are the ‘co-owners’ of the McIndoe buildings following established best practice in recognising the historic heritage values for their buildings? Are they proposing appropriate uses? Will they draw business away from the city centre? Are they flouting the zoning rules? Who is measuring this? Why should they pay less than others in consent fees? Why is their company a prospect for rates relief? And why is the Council trying to get some runs on the board for “Heritage” before the local body elections? We’re not told.

### DScene 31-3-10
Harbourside and heritage (front page)
It seems time is going to be called on Dunedin’s large scale retail zone – a part of town advocates believe would be the perfect location for the revamp proposed in Dunedin City Council’s controversial Harbourside redevelopment proposal. See p3. #bookmark

Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Editorial: Time for candidates to speak up (page 2)
It’s put up or shut up time. DScene – and quite a few others besides – have been wondering how many of the current crop of city councillors will be standing again in October, and who will challenge the incumbents.
{continues} #bookmark

Council may drop plan (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council seems likely to drop its large-scale retail zone – an initiative which has struggled to revive the area of the city between the wharves and the central city. Advocates are now hoping council can be persuaded to move its controversial proposed rezoning of the harbourside back a few blocks, to redevelop the large-scale retail zone. […] New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago Southland area manager Owen Graham emphasised the importance of heritage to Dunedin. It had the potential to contribute just as much economically to the city as the building of new developments.
{continues} #bookmark

Building owner’s protest may pay off (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Last week’s protest by heritage building co-owner Lawrie Forbes may have paid off. Forbes featured in last week’s issue of DScene protesting the restrictions of the large scale retail block where the McIndoe buildings are located – and a potential $37,000 bill for consents and related costs. Forbes was confident after an eleventh hour meeting with Dunedin City Council planners late last week he would obtain a resource consent for existing use, to allow the urban renewal of one of the former John McIndoe buildings on Crawford St.
{continues} #bookmark

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Council meeting @Middlemarch – pity about the closed doors

### Channel 9 Online ch9.co.nz March 29, 2010 – 7:23pm
Dunedin City Council meets in Middlemarch
The Dunedin City Council met today for a full Council meeting in Middlemarch, after an invitation to do so was extended by the Strath Taieri Community Board. The Council were treated to some good old fashioned country hospitality, before getting down to business, which was mainly held behind closed doors.
Video

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### ODT Online Mon, 29 Mar 2010
Carisbrook and harbour discussions not public

By David Loughrey
The future of Carisbrook and its surrounding properties are due to come before the Dunedin City Council today, but whether the public will be any the wiser after the meeting remains something of a mystery, due to privacy provisions. The agenda for the council’s meeting, to be held in Middlemarch, includes four items about which there is bound to strong public interest, but all are up for consideration during the non-public part of the meeting.
Read more

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Agenda – Council – 29/03/2010 (PDF, 142.5 kb, new window)

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Withdraw proposed Harbourside plan change in its entirety!

On the basis of all information now to hand, there is no basis whatsoever for the proposed harbourside plan change. Not for stage 1, not for stage 2. Not for any of it. Certainly, not while there is no at grade crossing in Rattray-Fryatt St for direct vehicle, cycle and pedestrian access to the Steamer Basin from the CBD.

The ODT editorial writer can descend into waffle as much as he likes (he started well) – the whole plan change must be withdrawn. Throw it back at Jim Harland and Chalmers Properties Ltd. May it knock them out. ABANDON PLAY.

There is no point in a compromise.
There is no point in the Environment Court process being pursued.

Lunacy is very hard to give up.

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### ODT Online Sat, 27 Mar 2010
Editorial: Harbourside jobs
The clamour against the Dunedin City Council harbourside district plan changes is louder than a foundry hammer. Businesses in the area are alarmed and upset and are being backed in an extraordinarily strong show of support by the Otago Chamber of Commerce and other firms around the city. The businesses fear that changes to a mixed “harbourside” zone will kill them off, whether it be quickly or – as one manager said – by a thousand cuts. Gone will be the security of industrial zoning rights to underpin current operations and possible expansion.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Why should Port Otago dredge?

### ODT Online Sat, 27 Mar 2010
Fishermen oppose Port Otago’s sand, silt proposal
By Allison Rudd
Otago fishermen have formed a working party to write their formal response to Port Otago’s plans to dump more than seven million cubic metres of sand and silt off Taiaroa Head. Port Otago will soon apply for resource consent to widen the Otago Harbour shipping channel and dump 7.2 million cubic metres of dredge material 6.5km out to sea.

The Port Chalmers Fishermen’s Co-operative fears the sand and silt may create a “dead zone” along the coast, threatening fishing stocks and their income.

Read more

Related posts:
21.2.10 So where’s the media explosion?
26.2.10 Latest on Dunedin’s offshore oil and gas prospects
26.2.10 Port Otago: “Next generation” project
11.3.10 ORC: Ports merger only approved if it benefits Otago
18.3.10 Dunedin harbourside for oil base?

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The interesting thing is, aside from port merger politics, a number of New Zealand’s major ports are dredging their channels in anticipation of larger container vessels.

Did the ports’ boards stop to ask the shipping line(s) ‘What size of boats are you planning to send us?’ So we, the port companies, can reliably assess if we need to fund expensive consenting processes and dredging?

Sometimes, the ports’ suit brigades aren’t up to managing their way out of a paper bag? That’s not the right question, or is it. After all, this is a matter of regional-national logistics and planning for sustainable business development in New Zealand.

Bottom line: port activity must be coordinated and quality controlled for the service and development of the national export economy as much as the global shipping trade.

The ports falling into into ad hoc, reactionary localised practice; attempting to do things on the cheap; not attending to maritime safety; not upskilling and training the workforce; failing to coordinate the spread of risk across our major deepwater facilities and access points; not inviting new business partnerships and supplier relationships; and so on – is not about promoting and building an efficient, flexible and sustainable freighting base for New Zealand producers.

Why encourage container traffic through the port of Lyttelton if their cranes are unsuitably old and clunky (showing the lack of major investment in that port company’s infrastructure)?

Why send (larger?) container ships to Port Otago if there’s no harbour master to oversee maritime safety? Why would we think to promote Dunedin as an oil base without a harbour master? (Hello, Otago Regional Council, owner of Port Otago Ltd, are you going to manage your responsibilities to the marine environment anytime soon? …An international vessel grounds in Otago Harbour, we haven’t systems and accountabilities in place to manage spillage and contamination – the boat’s full of high value Fonterra milk powder immediately due to China processing plants – we’ve f***ed the supply chain. Who doesn’t get their money, who is liable?)

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Knowing and managing risks and liabilities going forward through close modelling, system analysis and quality control of New Zealand supply chains, industry processing, freight handling and haulage, transportation planning, trade diplomacy, incentive systems, international gateway ports and airports – amongst other factors – is ESSENTIAL to growing the export economy.

Not too many people know how the ports operate. We assume all the systems and risks are being professionally managed by the port companies, according to statutory requirements.

The truth is – leaving statutory responsibilities aside for a moment (by the way, it’s not all tip-top with these) – each port has been crawling along, instituting its own limited management and operating systems. A power of work at every level is urgently needed to bring industry consistency to the safe management and competitiveness of our New Zealand ports.

Why allow a bunch of ‘sailors’ (many of them accountants with no wider training or expertise), dressed as port executives, to run New Zealand port infrastructure like they know what they’re doing. They don’t.

The ports’ middle management tiers are gripped by the heavy overwhelming reality of historical cumulative logistical weakness in the New Zealand port industry.

All up, ports’ management is not well organised – or sufficiently well skilled and educated – for the practical, hardnosed ‘change management’ required in the national port sector.

The port boards and bosses are under par as strategists. Let the blood-letting begin.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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