Monthly Archives: March 2016

DCC: Infrastructure report 2 pending —Mudtanks & stormwater drainage #SouthDunedinFlood

Douglas Field Published on Mar 30, 2016 | Updated Jul 30, 2016
busy doin’ nonth’

Comments from Lyndon Weggery:

2016/03/31 at 11:12 am
Newsflash!!! – According to my DCC source the long awaited MudTank report will be tabled on Tuesday 26 April 2016 to the Infrastructure Services Committee. That’s nearly 11 months after the infamous event.

2016/03/31 at 3:34 pm
Elizabeth – aside from our patient waiting for the Mudtank report we are also waiting for any progress on a Council formal resolution dated 30 November 2015 requesting staff to implement a work programme etc to alleviate the flooding dangers to South Dunedin. So far nothing has happened and in the course of a polite discussion with Councillor Aaron Hawkins on Facebook on related matters I have asked him to check on progress. To his credit he has agreed to do so.

● ODT 5.3.16 New contractor for mud tanks
● ODT 25.1.16 April date for report on flooding

Council meeting 30 Nov 2015

Minutes – Council – 30/11/2015 (PDF, 121.8 KB)

Report – Council – 30/11/2015 (PDF, 553.9 KB)
Infrastructure Performance During June 2015 Flood Event [report 1]

17
INFRASTRUCTURE PERFORMANCE DURING JUNE 2015 FLOOD EVENT

A report from Water and Waste Services provided an overview of the extreme rain event of 3 June 2015, its impacts and the performance of the drainage infrastructure. It focused primarily on the impact of the events that were experienced in South Dunedin, as that had been an area of particular public interest.

The analysis presented in the report was based on a flow balance model that had been developed for the purposes of assessing the impact of pumping station performance. The flow balance model had also been used to assess the relative impacts of the high groundwater levels in South Dunedin that significantly increased the amount of runoff generated by the rainfall.

The rain event significantly exceeded the capacity of the stormwater system in South Dunedin. The post event analysis had identified some opportunities to improve the performance of the existing infrastructure in large scale rain events, but would not prevent serious flooding in a similar future rain event.

Work was already underway to redesign the screens at the Portobello Road pumping station to make it easier to keep them clear during large events and was expected to be completed during the current financial year.

The planned infrastructure improvements would slightly reduce the impact of future flooding. However extensive flooding of low lying areas in large scale rain events or long duration rain events remained highly likely, particularly if the rain event coincided with high groundwater conditions.

The General Manager Infrastructure and Networks and Group Manager Water and Waste commented on various aspects of the report and responded to questions from Councillors.

Councillor Thomson left the meeting from 3.52 pm to 3.55 pm and Councillor Staynes left the meeting from 3.54 pm to 4.35 pm during the course of questions. Councillor Vandervis left the meeting from 4.36 pm to 4.38 pm and Councillor Peat left the meeting at 4.38 pm.

Following questions it was moved (The Mayor/Wilson):

“That the Council:

a) Notes the report on Infrastructure Performance during the June 2015 Flood Event.”

b) Notes the serious implications and consequences of rising ground water levels in parts of Dunedin.

c) That staff investigate and report back on a work programme to address the issues caused by rising ground water levels in South Dunedin and other parts of the city.

d) Notes that the report should include:
i) Possible responses to a range of sea level and climate change scenarios.
ii) Budgetary, infrastructural and community implications of both scenarios and responses.
iii) Catchment wide stormwater systems, ownership and effective management.

e) Notes that Council’s long term aims, as much as possible, are:
i) that the environment of affected parts of Dunedin is improved to an acceptable level.
ii) that no Dunedin citizen, ratepayer or householder is seriously disadvantaged as a result of any measures taken to deal with the challenges of ground water and rising sea levels.”

Councillor Peat returned to the meeting at 4.42 pm.

During discussion the work of staff was acknowledged during the time of the flooding.

Following discussion Motion (a) was put and carried on a division 14:0 with one abstention.
For: Councillors Benson-Pope, Bezett, Calvert, Hall, Hawkins, Lord, MacTavish, Noone, Peat, Staynes, Thomson, Whiley, Wilson, The Mayor
Council minutes – 30 November and 14 December 2015 7
Abstention: Councillor Vandervis, on the grounds that the motion did not identify the major flood causes as he understood them

Motions (b) – (d) were put and carried on a division 13:1 with one abstention.
For: Councillors Benson-Pope, Bezett, Calvert, Hall, Hawkins, Lord, MacTavish, Noone, Peat, Staynes, Thomson, Wilson, The Mayor Against: Councillor Whiley Abstention: Councillor Vandervis

Motion (e) was put and carried on a division 12:2 with one abstention.
For: Councillors Benson-Pope, Bezett, Hall, Hawkins, Lord, MacTavish, Noone, Peat, Staynes, Thomson, Wilson, The Mayor Against: Councillors Calvert, Whiley Abstention: Councillor Vandervis

It was moved (The Mayor/Staynes):
“That the meeting adjourns for ten minutes.”
Motion carried

The meeting adjourned from 5.35 pm to 5.47 pm.
[Item 17 ends]

Dunedin City Council Published on Dec 7, 2015
Dunedin City Council – Council Meeting – November 30 2015
Agenda Item 17 from 1:09:50

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Ratepayers achieve for Kaipara District —what Dunedin counterparts fail to do for spurious ‘pet projects’

Link + message received.
Thu, 31 Mar 2016 at 8:24 a.m.

█ Message: Maybe time to revisit Jacks Point and Luggate? …

The Mangawhai wastewater scheme cost about $63.3 million. Overall costs were not just financial, the Auditor-General’s report said. “They included a failed council, councillors replaced with commissioners, the departure of a chief executive, a severely damaged relationship between the council and community, an organisation that needed to be rebuilt, and much more.”

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 17:21, March 30 2016
Dispute settlement sees Auditor General pay nearly $5.4 million to Kaipara District Council
About $5.375 million will be paid to the Kaipara District Council by the Auditor-General’s office now that a dispute between the two has been settled. Mediation of the dispute over audit issues around the controversial and costly Mangawhai wastewater scheme was held by retired High Court judge Rodney Hansen QC, without any admission of liability and for each party to cover their own litigation costs.

Auditor-General Lyn Provost’s scathing inquiry report to Parliament in December 2013 outlined “a woeful saga” surrounding the community wastewater scheme, managed by the then-council between 1996 and 2012. It covered roles played by other agencies, including the Controller and Auditor-General’s office. The inquiry found the council failed to adequately perform its responsibilities to the community in connection with the wastewater scheme. The council itself alleged the Auditor-General did not identify these failings in a timely manner and take appropriate steps to bring them to the council’s attention. It also alleged some of the poor decisions it made could have been averted if the Auditor-General’s office had performed its responsibilities appropriately.

The Auditor-General offered an unreserved apology in the report to the Kaipara district community for the office’s failings in some of its work, but disputed the council’s damages claim. In particular, the Auditor-General considered the council had the responsibility to comply with its statutory obligations, and its failure to do so is not attributable to the Auditor-General’s office. The dispute was settled with neither party admitting liability but the Auditor-General’s office agreeing to pay $5.38 million to Kaipara District Council.

A rates revolt began as costs were included in Mangawhai rates, with some properties connected to the new scheme now paying around $3000 annually in rates. Kaipara District Council commissioner John Robertson said the council was pleased to see a positive outcome from the High Court action it took against the Auditor-General in 2014. “If we hadn’t got an outcome we would be back in court and facing all the risks of whatever judgments go on these sorts of things.”

The Kaipara District Council has two more court battles pending with Mangawhai ratepayers.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
3.10.15 Kaipara Concerns —ADOTROL* disease [Dunedin mention, again!]
13.2.15 Associate Minister of Local Government: Return democracy to Kaipara
2.2.15 LGNZ run by Mad Rooster Yule, end of story
27.11.14 Auditor-general Lyn Provost #Resign
31.10.14 Whaleoil on “dodgy ratbag local body politicians” —just like ours at DCC
9.9.14 Mangawhai, Kaipara: Latest news + Winston Peter’s speech
19.7.14 Whaleoil / Cameron Slater on ratepayers’ lament
29.5.14 Mangawhai Ratepayers and Residents Assn wins at High Court
31.3.14 Audit services to (paying) local bodies #FAIL ● AuditNZ ● OAG…
29.1.14 Mangawhai, Kaipara —we hear ya!
3.12.13 LGNZ: OAG report on Kaipara
12.11.13 Northland council amalgamation
29.6.13 Audit NZ and OAG clean bill of health —Suspicious!
21.4.13 Councils “in stchook” —finance & policy analyst Larry.N.Mitchell
19.3.12 Local government reform
21.2.12 Kaipara this time

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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RNZ in Absolutely Great Form [broadsheet carks it, who? where?]

SAMPLE

### RNZ National about 1 hour ago
Toby & Toby on …. The newspaper apocalypse and Sonny Bill Williams’ incredible new look
OPINION: Toby Manhire & Toby Morris

RNZ 30.3.16 Disappearing-newspaper - Toby Manhire and Toby Morris

Pardon?
“Newspaper apocalypse” is hyperbolic tabloidese, granted, but there’s a grain of truth there. In the UK, the final Independent newspaper was printed a few days ago, and the title now exists online only, with a much smaller, and less well paid, reporting staff. Hundreds of newspapers around the world have similarly folded, and many more are staring down the barrel, all since the Great Change.

The Great Change? Is this the bit about Sonny Bill Williams’ incredible new look?
No. That was shameless and misleading clickbait. Sorry.
Read more

█ A CIRCUMSPECT(ish) weekly column published every Wednesday, by graphic artist Toby Morris and journalist Toby Manhire. CLEVER RNZ, WOOP !!!

Related Post and Comments:
20.3.16 RNZ: ‘Is the ODT going OTT?’ #paywall

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: Snow White cause of substantial loss + DRAFT Annual Plan

snow-white-and-the-seven-dwarfs [sisterlondon.com] 1Vestiges of Purity for ALL [ethical cleansing HITS town]

‘Some of the unfavourable variance because of divestment losses’

### ODT Online Wed, 30 Mar 2016
City pays cost for divesting
By Timothy Brown
Some of the Dunedin City Council’s divestment decisions have cost the city, it was revealed at yesterday’s council finance committee meeting. […] The council voted last May to scrap any investments the [Waipouri] fund had in the munitions, tobacco, fossil fuel extraction, gambling or pornography industries and to bar future investment in those industries. […] The fund had produced $783,000 in profit during the eight months to February 29. However, this was $1.657million down on the budgeted $2.44million profit.
Read more

Agenda – FIN – 29/03/2016 (PDF, 1.8 MB)
This agenda includes the reports

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 Public Forum [page 4]
2 Apologies [4]
3 Confirmation of Agenda [4]
4 Declaration of Interest [5]

PART A REPORTS (Committee has power to decide these matters)

5 Financial Result – Period Ended 29 February 2016 [6]
This report provides a commentary of the financial performance of Council for the period ended 29 February 2016 and the financial position as at that date. The net deficit (including Waipori) for the eight months to February was $5.878 million or $381k worse than budget.

6 Financial Result – Period Ended 31 January 2016 [31]
This report provides the financial results for the period ended 31 January 2016 and the financial position as at that date. The net deficit (including Waipori) for the seven months to January was $6.668 million or $36k worse than budget.

Related Posts and Comments:
26.3.16 Dunedin: Erosion issues at St Clair and Ocean Beach
25.1.16 DCC: South Dunedin Integrated Catchment Management Plan (ICMP)
5.1.16 Hammered from all sides #fixit [dunedinflood Jun2015]
27.12.15 Pop Mashup(s) + Independent UK…on attack to local democracy
21.11.15 Mayor Cull won’t admit lack of maintenance #SouthDunedinFlood
14.7.15 DCC strategies needed like a hole in the head
27.4.15 She’s right: “We are a very poor city.” —Cr Hilary Calvert
6.4.15 Energy, a little picture #wow
25.5.14 Whaleoil: Rodney Hide on Dunedin’s Luddite Council
21.1.14 Jints, this one’s forya
13.1.14 Taking to water like a duck on oil

****

  • Dunedin City Council – Media Release
    Annual Plan consultation begins

    This item was published on 24 Mar 2016

    Should we be spending more on economic development in Dunedin and/or boosting funding for community grants? These are some of the questions the Dunedin City Council is asking residents as part of its 2016/17 Annual Plan and budget consultation, which opens today.

    Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says recent changes to the law mean the Council is taking a different approach to how it seeks feedback from residents on what should be included in the 2016/17 Annual Plan: “Just last year we went through a rigorous process developing a 10 year Long Term Plan (LTP), which sets out the city’s financial and strategic path. This year we are asking the community to comment largely on things we are proposing to add or change.” Some of the proposed changes are things that have already been discussed with the community and agreed on, but were either not funded in the LTP or not funded beyond the current 2015/16 year. Examples include the funding proposed for GigCity, UNESCO City of Literature and Dunedin’s Arts and Culture and Environment Strategies.

    Mr Cull says the planned increase in economic development resourcing is effectively a return of funding taken out several years ago because of budget constraints: “The proposed $790,000 increase in funding is largely community driven. One of the consistent messages emerging from residents is that job creation and business encouragement are vital for Dunedin. Our business sector is also telling us we need to market the city better to visitors and businesses.”

    Funding has also been provided for investigations into South Dunedin groundwater/ sea level rise issues [WHAT ISSUES – WHERE IS THE SCIENCE ?], and to investigate coastal erosion in other areas. Other proposed funding includes an extra $120,000 for community grants because there are always more requests than money available.

    These suggested changes can be achieved within the proposed 2.9% rates rise.

    The consultation document is now available at www.dunedin.govt.nz/2016AP. Public consultation on the Annual Plan closes at 5pm on 20 April. People are encouraged to provide their feedback early and, if possible, use the online form.

    A snapshot of what is proposed, presented in a map fold newsletter, will be delivered to every Dunedin household. Information will also be available at DCC service centres and libraries and at the Customer Services Agency in the Civic Centre. There will also be a public meeting and workshop, and six drop-in sessions with the opportunity for face-to-face discussion with Councillors. These will be held around the wider city during the consultation period.

    █ Comments on the DCC Facebook page and tweets to @DnCityCouncil using #DunedinAP will also be considered as feedback. The consultation period will be followed by hearings and deliberations in May and a final Annual Plan will be adopted by the Council in June.

    █ A range of supporting documents and an online submission form are available at www.dunedin.govt.nz/2016AP.

    Contact The Mayor of Dunedin on 03 477 4000.
    DCC Link

    Related Posts and Comments:
    23.2.16 Hold on! DCC Annual Plan 2016/17 #CommunityEngagement
    30.1.16 DCC Rates: LOCAL CONTEXT not Stats —Delta and Hippopotamuses
    26.11.15 DCC report: Mosgiel Pool Future Aquatic Provision
    12.9.15 Cr Kate ‘Cycleways’ Wilson —(disingenuous) fails constituents
    22.8.15 DCC cycleway$ now tied to more ‘urban de$ign’ $pend, after reha$h…
    14.7.15 DCC strategies needed like a hole in the head
    22.7.15 DCC Long Term Plan 2015/16 – 2024/25
    24.6.15 DCC Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS)
    29.5.15 Design alternatives to (pre-selected) bridge not canvassed by DCC
    5.5.15 DCC financial position | DCC reply: “$20M cash on hand” #LGOIMA
    4.5.15 DCC: Draft LTP matter —‘Unfunded Mosgiel Aquatic Facilities’
    28.9.14 “DCC entitlement” about to ramrod change at CBD #manipulation
    5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact… | consolidated council debt
    27.6.14 Stadium costs $23.4144 million per annum
    25.1.12 Waipori Fund – inane thinkings from a councillor
    17.11.13 Cull, MacTavish: (to borrow a phrase) “Have you fixed the debt crisis?”

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    *Image: sisterlondon.com – SW + dwarves, tweaked by whatifdunedin
    (many thanks to Disney)

    33 Comments

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    DPAG April #exhibition arrivals

    [click to enlarge]
    DPAG April 2016

    LIGHT SWITCH AND CONDUIT
    The Jim Barr and Mary Barr Collection
    9 Apr 2016 – 14 Aug 2016
    This exhibition explores the relationship between artworks and the domestic context by delving into the personal collection of Jim Barr and Mary Barr. Light switch and conduit focuses on their recent period of collecting and brings together works by key figures in the rising generation of contemporary New Zealand artists, alongside more established New Zealand artists and several international artists as well. This exhibition includes work by Dan Arps, Fiona Connor, Simon Denny, Oscar Enberg, Glen Hayward, Kate Newby, Campbell Patterson and Luke Willis Thompson. Link

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    *Michael Parekowhai Canis Minor 2016 (detail), Axminister carpet, brass, bronze, c-type photograph | Photo: Max Bellamy

    9 Comments

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    The Kills x4 +1 #music

    Domino Recording Co. Uploaded on Dec 10, 2007
    The Kills – U R A Fever (2008)
    Video for U R A Fever, first single to come off the band’s third album, out March 2008.

    organicunity Uploaded on Jul 20, 2009
    The Kills – Superpowerless
    Homemade video of Superpowerless by The Kills.

    Domino Recording Co. Uploaded on Jan 18, 2012
    The Kills – The Last Goodbye
    The Kills celebrate their ten year anniversary this poignant and playful video for ‘The Last Goodbye’, taken from their album ‘Blood Pressures’. Directed by the Oscar nominated actress Samantha Morton, who made her directorial feature debut with the critically acclaimed ‘The Unloved’, this is her first music video. Shot in monochrome on crisp, silvery 35mm, the video reflects the beautiful simplicity of the track, with an old-school photo booth providing an intimate backdrop for Mosshart’s intense and heart-warming opening performance followed by a series of touching to-camera poses reflecting the musicians’ longstanding, spirited friendship.

    TheKillsVEVO Published on Mar 1, 2016
    The Kills – Doing It To Death (Official Video)
    Taken from “Ash & Ice” — the brand new album from The Kills, out June 3rd 2016. Directed by Wendy Morgan.

    Yordana Jakobsen Uploaded on Jun 26, 2010
    The Kills – I Put A Spell On You (Screaming Jay Hawkins Cover) audio

    Wikipedia: The Kills
    The Kills are an indie rock band formed by American singer Alison Mosshart (“VV”) and British guitarist Jamie Hince (“Hotel”). Their first four albums, Keep On Your Mean Side, No Wow, Midnight Boom, and Blood Pressures, have garnered critical praise. Ash & Ice, their fifth and most recent studio album is set to be released on June 3, 2016. Wanting to cut themselves off from their pasts, Mosshart and Hince renamed themselves “VV” and “Hotel”, respectively. Hince said that he and Mosshart “got drunk one day and named each other off the top of our heads as a stupid romantic ode to the pop art scene.” Later, after each wrote multiple band name ideas on typewriters, Mosshart and Hince decided on a new name, The Kills. Together, they began writing sparse, minimalist songs with the aid of a drum machine.

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    1 Comment

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    Dairying, Housing : More on Resource Legislation Amendment Bill 2015

    Water resource management [lincoln.ac.nz] 1Irrigation [lincoln.ac.nz]

    █ Interpretation of the existing RMA has led to dairy intensification destroying waterways and threatening public health and welfare, in large measure.
    A bit of a tour….

    ### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 14:29, March 23 2016
    Canterbury rumbly-gut outbreak linked to dairying
    By Pat Deavoll
    An outbreak of “rumbly-gut” among communities in Canterbury has Waikato veterinarian and agri-ecology consultant Alison Dewes concerned. She thinks the outbreak is the result of dairy intensification and irrigation contaminating public drinking water. Thirty per cent of the region’s shallow wells have already experienced an increase in nitrogen and pathogen levels after 10-15 years of irrigation on shallow lighter soils, she says. “We have the highest rates of ecoli diseases in the world, and the highest rate of campylobacter, cryptosporidia and giardia in communities in the Hinds region. We have the highest rates of zoonoses (disease spread from animals to humans) in the world in some of the irrigated/dairy catchments like Selwyn and Hinds and the government is promoting a further 40,000ha of irrigation in an already allocated and at risk catchment. Economics and dairy intensification are trumping public health and welfare.”
    Read more

    ****

    ### NZ Herald Online 8:42 AM Wednesday Mar 9, 2016
    40pc of farms fail to lodge consents
    By Zaryd Wilson – Wanganui Chronicle
    Forty per cent of dairy farms required to lodge a resource consent application with Horizons Regional Council have not done so. A total of 229 dairy operations were required to have lodged an application by January 1 this year under the regional council’s One Plan, which aims to limit nitrogen pollution of waterways. The One Plan – adopted by the council in 2014 – limits nitrogen leaching by intensive farm operations, namely dairy, commercial horticulture, cropping and intensive sheep and beef farming. Figures released to the Chronicle under the Official Information Act reveal that only 137 of the 229 dairy operations which came under new rules have lodged consent applications. The new rules took effect on July 1 last year, and farms had six months – up until January 1 – to apply.
    Read more

    ****

    Wetland copy-header [nzarm.org.nz] 1Wetlands [nzarm.org.nz]

    26.11.15 NZH: Resource Management Act reforms to be introduced
    The Government will introduce its long awaited Resource Management Act reforms to Parliament next week after securing the support of the Maori Party. The reforms to the country’s main planning document stalled two years ago when National’s support partners refused to back them because of their potential impact on the environment.

    Ministry for the Environment

    About the Resource Legislation Amendment Bill 2015
    This page has information on the amendments proposed in 2015 to the Resource Management Act 1991.

    Resource Legislation Amendment Bill [New Zealand Legislation website]
    The Resource Legislation Amendment Bill (the Bill) was introduced to Parliament on 26 November 2015.

    ****

    Leading New Zealand law firm Chapman Tripp say:
    OPINION Most of the provisions in the Bill have been telegraphed in advance so there is little to surprise. If passed as drafted, it has the capacity to reduce costs and speed up planning processes – but probably only at the margins. For more radical and meaningful change we may have to await the results of the Productivity Commission’s inquiry into urban planning (see Chapman Tripp’s commentary here, dated 2.11.15).

    RMA Reform Bill – busy with change but less than National wanted
    Chapman Tripp 26 November 2015
    OPINION The ‘phase two’ RMA reforms, initially to have been passed in 2014, have now finally been introduced to Parliament as the Resource Legislation Amendment Bill. The Bill is a busy piece of legislation running to more than 200 pages, and aims to help streamline planning and consenting processes. But National has had to abandon its proposals to remove the “hierarchy” some saw as enshrined in the existing Part 2 of the RMA, promoting environmental values ahead of economic development in sections six and seven. After the loss of the Northland seat to Winston Peters in March, it does not have the votes to get the wider and more far-reaching changes through. We look at the Bill:
    Major changes
    ● Requiring councils to follow national planning templates (once such templates are available) with standardised provisions across the country.
    ● A range of measures aimed at producing faster, more flexible planning processes. These include: tighter timelines for plan production and the introduction of two new tracks – a collaborative track and a streamlined track.
    ● Reduced requirements for consents – allowing councils discretion not to require a resource consent for minor changes, creating a new 10 day fast-track for simple consents and eliminating the need for an RMA consent when consenting is provided for in other legislation.
    ● Stronger national direction – especially in relation to hot-button issues like providing for new housing or addressing dairy stock in rivers.
    Read more

    Blue skies review for urban planning – the take-off
    Chapman Tripp 15 January 2016
    OPINION The blue skies review into urban planning has now left the runway, with the release by the Productivity Commission before Christmas of an issues paper seeking feedback on possible directions for change.

    Continue reading

    7 Comments

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