Monthly Archives: October 2013

Town Belt Traverse | Sunday 3 Nov

Originally published on October 14, 2013.

TownBeltTraverse 1This year is the 125th anniversary of the foundation of
the Dunedin Amenities Society.

The Town Belt plays a special role in our history and is one of New Zealand’s oldest and most unique landscape, recreational and biodiversity assets.

The Society is holding the Town Belt Traverse on Sunday 3 November as a self-guided 7.9 km walk that takes in just a few of the historical and natural highlights of this unique area.

This is a family friendly non-competitive event designed for people to re-acquaint themselves with the Town Belt and enjoy its beauty.

The generosity of many local businesses means the Society has some great prizes to give away for those who take part and complete the walk.

So get your walking shoes, grab your dog lead or your pram and do the Town Belt Traverse with your friends and family.

Check this link for the details…..

Paul Pope
DAS website editor

———
The Dunedin Amenities Society established in 1888 is New Zealand’s oldest environmental society.

Visit our website www.dunedin-amenities-society.org.nz
Follow the Society on Twitter
Visit the Society on Facebook

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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FYI Dunedin, through the post

DCC FYI Dunedin 12 (November 2013)DCC News: FYI Dunedin Issue 12 (November 2013)
[click to enlarge]

This issue and others at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/fyi-dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Not just in America !!!

Link from Martin Legge.

### marketoracle.co.uk Oct 28, 2013 – 09:37 AM GMT
Politics / Social Issues
America’s Culture of Ignorance
By James Quinn

“Five percent of the people think; ten percent of the people think they think; and the other eighty-five percent would rather die than think.” –Thomas Edison

The kabuki theatre that passes for governance in Washington D.C. reveals the profound level of ignorance shrouding this Empire of Debt in its prolonged death throes. Ignorance of facts; ignorance of math; ignorance of history; ignorance of reality; and ignorance of how ignorant we’ve become as a nation, have set us up for an epic fall. It’s almost as if we relish wallowing in our ignorance like a fat lazy sow in a mud hole. The lords of the manor are able to retain their power, control and huge ill-gotten riches because the government educated serfs are too ignorant to recognize the self-evident contradictions in the propaganda they are inundated with by state controlled media on a daily basis.

“Any formal attack on ignorance is bound to fail because the masses are always ready to defend their most precious possession – their ignorance.” –Hendrik Willem van Loon

The levels of ignorance are multi-dimensional and diverse, crossing all educational, income, and professional ranks. The stench of ignorance has settled like Chinese toxic smog over our country, as various constituents have chosen comforting ignorance over disconcerting knowledge. The highly educated members, who constitute the ruling class in this country, purposefully ignore facts and truth because the retention and enhancement of their wealth and power are dependent upon them not understanding what they clearly have the knowledge to understand. The underclass wallow in their ignorance as their life choices, absence of concern for marriage or parenting, lack of interest in educating themselves, and hiding behind the cross of victimhood and blaming others for their own failings. Everyone is born ignorant and the path to awareness and knowledge is found in reading books. Rich and poor alike are free to read and educate themselves. The government, union teachers, and a village are not necessary to attain knowledge. It requires hard work and clinging to your willful ignorance to remain stupid.

The youth of the country consume themselves in techno-narcissistic triviality, barely looking up from their iGadgets long enough to make eye contact with other human beings. The toxic combination of government delivered public education, dumbed down socially engineered curriculum, taught by uninspired intellectually average union controlled teachers, to distracted, unmotivated, latchkey kids, has produced a generation of young people ignorant about history, basic mathematical concepts, and the ability or interest to read and write. They have been taught to feel rather than think critically. They have been programmed to believe rather than question and explore. Slogans and memes have replaced knowledge and understanding. They have been lured into inescapable student loan debt serfdom by the very same government that is handing them a $200 trillion entitlement bill and an economy built upon low paying service jobs that don’t require a college education, because the most highly educated members of society realized that outsourcing the higher paying production jobs to slave labour factories in Asia was great for the bottom line, their stock options and bonus pools.

Instead of being outraged and lashing out against this injustice, the medicated, daycare reared youth passively lose themselves in the inconsequentiality and shallowness of social media, reality TV, and the internet, while living in their parents’ basement. They have chosen the ignorance inflicted upon their brains by thousands of hours spent twittering, texting, facebooking, seeking out adorable cat videos on the internet, viewing racist rap singer imbeciles rent out sports stadiums to propose to vacuous big breasted sluts on reality cable TV shows, and sitting zombie-like for days with a controller in hand blowing up cities, killing whores, and murdering policemen using their new PS4 on their 65 inch HDTV, rather than gaining a true understanding of the world by reading Steinbeck, Huxley, and Orwell. Technology has reduced our ability to think and increased our ignorance.

“During my eighty-seven years, I have witnessed a whole succession of technological revolutions. But none of them has done away with the need for character in the individual or the ability to think.” –Bernard M. Baruch

The youth have one thing going for them. They are still young and can awaken from their self-imposed stupor of ignorance. There are over 80 million millenials between the ages of 8 and 30 years old who need to start questioning the paradigm they are inheriting and critically examining the mendacious actions of their elders. The future of the country is in their hands, so I hope they put down those iGadgets and open their eyes before it is too late. We need many more patriots like Edward Snowden and far fewer twerking sluts like Miley Cyrus if we are to overcome the smog of apathy and ignorance blanketing our once sentient nation.

The ignorance of youth can be chalked up to inexperience, lack of wisdom, and immaturity. There is no excuse for the epic level of ignorance displayed by older generations over the last thirty years. Boomers and Generation X have charted the course of this ship of state for decades. Ship of fools is a more fitting description, as they have stimulated the entitlement mentality that has overwhelmed the fiscal resources of the country. Our welfare/warfare empire, built upon a Himalayan mountain of debt, enabled by a central bank owned by Wall Street, and perpetuated by swarms of corrupt bought off spineless politicians, is the ultimate testament to the seemingly limitless level of ignorance engulfing our civilization. The entitlement mindset permeates our culture from the richest to the poorest. Mega-corporations use their undue influence (bribes disguised as campaign contributions) to elect pliable candidates to office, hire lobbyists to write the laws and tax regulations governing their industries, and collude with the bankers and other titans of industry to harvest maximum profits from the increasingly barren fields of a formerly thriving land of milk and honey. By unleashing a torrent of unbridled greed, ransacking the countryside, and burning down the villages, the ruling class has planted the seeds of their own destruction.
Read more

● James Quinn is a senior director of strategic planning for a major university. James has held financial positions with a retailer, homebuilder and university in his 22-year career. Those positions included treasurer, controller, and head of strategic planning. He is married with three boys and is writing these articles because he cares about their future. He earned a BS in accounting from Drexel University and an MBA from Villanova University. He is a certified public accountant and a certified cash manager.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: First meeting, tidy or not

### ODT Online Tue, 29 Oct 2013
First test for Cull as council meets
By Chris Morris
Support for Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull’s appointments will be put to the test when councillors take their seats for the first time in public today. The new council – featuring seven new faces compared with the last term – will hold its inaugural meeting this afternoon. One of the first orders of business, after councillors are sworn in, will be to consider reports outlining Mr Cull’s appointments to positions of responsibility and changes to the committee structure.
[The] largely-procedural meeting will include reports from Mr Cull on the council’s revamped committee structure, membership and appointments to outside organisations.*
The meeting will also mark the contributions of two long-serving city councillors, Paul Hudson and Teresa Stevenson, after both stood unsuccessfully for another term.
Read more

Information on the new Councillors will be available at the DCC website from 8 November 2013.

Excerpt. See page 3 of the council report ‘Committee Structure and Membership’ listed below:

DCC Chairs and Deputy Chairs for Council Committees

*We note from the following reports that Cr Lee Vendervis has been given NO appointments to outside organisations. Mayor Cull is being punitive, if not impolitic and absurdly petulant.

Dunedin City Council
INAUGURAL MEETING, 2013-16 TRIENNIUM

Tuesday, 29 October 2013, 1.00 PM
Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers

Agenda – Council – 29/10/2013 (PDF, 82 KB) – View as HTML
Inaugural Meeting

Report – Council – 29/10/2013 (PDF, 71 KB) – View as HTML
Appointment to Outside Organisations

Report – Council – 29/10/2013 (PDF, 228 KB) – View as HTML
Committee Structure and Membership

Report – Council – 29/10/2013 (PDF, 100 KB) – View as HTML
Legislation

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

23 Comments

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DCC (EDU) invents new job! —Gigatown/Digital Office

Anonymous: In what possible universe does it take a full time role to coordinate sending tweets?

Whatifdunedin: Something Chanel could do in her coffee breaks across the day.

Received.

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Chanel O’Brien [DCC EDU]
Date: Thu, Oct 17, 2013 at 1:11 PM
Subject: New Role – Gigatown Project Coordinator
To: Chanel O’Brien
Cc: “EDU (Economic Development)”

Good Afternoon,

Gigatown will be the first town in the Southern Hemisphere to access one gigabit per second (1Gbps) internet connection. The winning town will be the one that creates the most buzz using social media and online community engagement. The town with the loudest voice will be New Zealand’s first Gigatown and will be positioned to become a leading digital innovation hub for New Zealand.

http://www.gigatown.co.nz/

The Digital Office is looking for a Gigatown Project Coordinator who will help Dunedin with the campaign to win the Gigatown challenge by coordinating, promoting and running events across the City. A pivotal role in this exciting opportunity for the City.

The position description is attached. [see below]

For more information please contact the Digital Office at:

hello @ digitaloffice.co.nz

Thank you

Best wishes

Chanel

Chanel O’Brien
Business Development Advisor
Economic Development Unit
Dunedin City Council

50 The Octagon, Dunedin; P O Box 5045, Moray Place, Dunedin 9058, New Zealand

Telephone: 03 477 4000; Fax: 03 474 3736
Email: chanel.obrien @ dcc.govt.nz

● Position Description – Project Coordinator

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30.9.11 Wellington Towards 2040
20.12.10 Your City Our Future – call for community feedback and suggestions
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18.8.09 Wi-Fi: DCC favours Octagon businesses to exclusion of others
20.7.09 Want/need free Wi-Fi network – do we???

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin: “no-growth city”

Dunedin City Council critic Calvin Oaten, in a piece he has also sent to the mayor and incoming council, proposes the city should be run on a ”no-growth basis”.

### ODT Online Thu, 24 Oct 2013
Opinion
Dunedin, no-growth city?
By Calvin Oaten
Maybe a good starting point would be to review some recent history. The health of any community is unarguably based on its financial stability and its leaders being fully mindful of the need to protect the citizens’ treasure, spending it wisely, and quietly maintaining and improving their wellbeing.
Has this been the priority of our leaders over time? Recently it seems not. In fact one sometimes wonders if there is any comprehension at all of what is meant by good governance and prudence.
When I look at the long-term annual plan of 2003-04 I found the city’s net debt was $53.463 million and was scheduled to peak in 2011-12 at $147.466 million. Looking at it 10 years later, the 2013-14 plan shows the debt at $270.290 million. If we include stadium debt of $146 million, this comes to a total of $416.290 million. So, an increase over 10 years of $362.82 million. Does that indicate financial prudence?
Oh, and we should not forget DCHL’s contribution to our malaise. It has been extorted and mismanaged to the point where it and the DCC’s combined consolidated debt amounts to about $623 million. As shareholders, this by extension is ours. Think about that.

Dunedin has been in a slow, inexorable decline, whether we acknowledge it or not.

The statistics demonstrate this clearly and concisely. The 1901 census shows Dunedin’s population was 70,000 while New Zealand’s was 815,862. We were 8.5% of that total. In 1921 we were 81,848 souls and New Zealand 1,284,873. We were 6.3% of that total. Then in 1936, 82,000, 1950, 91,200 and in 2006, 118,683. Meanwhile, New Zealand in 2013 is 4,480,182. We are just 2.64% of that. Put another way, in 105 years Dunedin grew by 69%, while the country grew by 450%.
Read more

Related Post and Comments:
20.10.13 Doh, low growth for Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Whaleoil on a favourite theme of ours

Whale Oil Beef Hooked logoA vigorous, voracious press would keep our country honest, unfortunately they are all as corrupt as Len Brown
by Cameron Slater on October 23, 2013
Our media have and continue to act in an utterly shameful manner. Now chasing off after some irrelevant titbit that some National MP said something. It is pathetic… our media like to claim they are the ones who hold the powerful to account, instead they are gutless, shameful apologists. They should be embarrassed. Len Brown is playing the victim now and his Albert Street branch of the mayoral office is running interference beautifully on his behalf. He has declared that there needs to be regulation of what people can say about politicians private lives…and there is not a squeak out of the media about that… instead they are running around looking for a conspiracy when the only conspiracy that exists is their conspiracy to talk about anything but Len Brown’s shenanigans. We need a powerful media, that as Boris Johnson says should be vigorous and voracious in order to keep the country honest… instead we have a bunch of gutless lapdogs doing the biding of ratbags, criminals and the corrupt.
Read more

@Whaleoil on Twitter | Whaleoil on Facebook

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC in-house catering, pruned like CCC?

An interesting article. I’ve been away from DCC for too long to know whether the free lunches, after meeting drinks etc are still standard for Councillors after meetings. It was normal two councils ago, but you might know whether that is still the case or whether Paul Orders has got it under control. –Source

dcc catering [yelp.com]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 15:30 23/10/2013
No free lunch for councillors
By Glenn Conway
There is no such thing as a free lunch, especially at the Christchurch City Council from now on. Mayor-elect Lianne Dalziel has ordered her new-look council to bring their own lunches to work or buy from a local business rather than rely on the in-house catering service. The move is part of her deliberate shift in culture from a council that feels entitled to a council that is there to work for the community.

Today was a case in point – the new mayor brought some homemade chicken salad to work.

If councillors wanted to have a drink after a busy day, they could do that – “but it’s not going to be on the ratepayer”. Catering cost the council more than $45,000 in the past financial year, but Dalziel wants to keep councillors aware of the fact they are there to work for the ratepayers, not to be fed by them. Dalziel said it was a part of her push for a culture change throughout the organisation. On days of long meetings, some catering may be provided but, as a general rule, “I’ve told them it’s BYO [bring your own]”, she said.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Harbourside: Access to a revamped Steamer Basin has public backing

Liability Cull is not 100% correct. So what’s new.

The ‘harbourside’ public consultation, including pre-plan change workshops, picked up good support for IMPROVED public access to the waterline (note, via a reinstated Rattray Street rail crossing at grade) and a REVAMPED Steamer Basin.

WE HAVE BEEN ROBBED.
Cull says the harbourside plan change was a mistake. It most surely was not a mistake! The proposed plans for how the plan change would be articulated in the area were the problem. Nearly everyone wanted historic industrial sheds and wharf sheds to remain and be redeveloped sympathetically with respect to heritage values, enhancing the land-water connection. Unfortunately, and fortunately, the Otago Chamber of Commerce with five partners appealed the plan change decision, significantly dashing the intents and purposes of the “vision”. Nonetheless, this shouldn’t stop future redevelopment of the ‘edge’ at the Steamer Basin, for greater community recreational use, with some commercial opportunities built in. We still haven’t got walk-on/walk-off access for the cruising yachts heading to subantarctic waters —embarrassing.

OK DCC’s broke at the moment, but ORC…

Cull – Crash one (PC-7), get bent on inviting the real mistake… the $100m tombstone apartment and hotel complex at 41 Wharf Street, with all inherent costs to Dunedin ratepayers and residents. That’s where Cull stands, nowhere good. Not even close.

Plan Change 7 – Harbourside

### ODT Online Mon, 21 Oct 2013
Harbour project labelled mistake
By Chris Morris
Pursuing a vision of harbourside redevelopment in Dunedin has so far cost the city’s ratepayers more than $2.6 million, it has been confirmed. The revelation, prompted by Otago Daily Times inquiries, has led the Otago Chamber of Commerce to label the Dunedin City Council’s ”grandiose” plan a mistake. It has also prompted Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull, who was an early critic of the proposal, to suggest it should never have got off the ground.
Read more

DCC’s habourside costs – $2.6m (via ODT)
• Legal costs – $401,660
• Settlement – $200,000
• Other costs – $315,633
• Capital costs – $1,697,192
• Total – $2,614,485

Capital costs of $1,697,192 comprising:

• 2005-06 – purchase of 20 Thomas Burns St – $497,500
• 2011-12 – purchase of 30 Thomas Burns St – $1,199,692

NZHPT Dunedin Harbourside Historic Area (1)NZHPT Dunedin Harbourside Historic Area

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24.9.12 Stadium Councillors back coastal oil exploration
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● 26.10.11 Dunedin Harbourside: DCC “caved”
17.12.10 HARBOURSIDE Announcement
17.4.10 Harbourside: more negotiation to come
16.4.10 DCC Media Release – Harbourside Stage Two
13.4.10 Dunedin – an oil base?
1.4.10 DCC Media Release – Harbourside
27.3.10 Withdraw proposed Harbourside plan change in its entirety!
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10.3.13 Plan Change 7: Harbourside – remove stage two
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█ For more, enter the terms *loan and mercantile*, *harbourside*, *hotel*, *balloon*, *shell*, *anadarko* or *SH88* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

ODT: Piece of maritime history moved
Another lost opportunity cut in half — Te Whaka at Birch St Wharf
Image: norsetroll.blogspot.com

Te Whaka, Birch St Wharf [norsetroll.blogspot.com]

11 Comments

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Owen Graham, heritage advocate

Owen Graham [odt.co.nz] re-imaged 3

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Wins and the odd loss in preservation game
By Rosie Manins

Owen Graham, of Dunedin, counts the preservation of the Athenaeum Library in the Octagon as one of the highlights of his six years as the Otago-Southland area manager for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust.
Longtime heritage advocate Owen Graham hopes his grandchildren will benefit from his work to preserve Otago’s history.
Mr Graham recently ended his six-year tenure as the Otago-Southland area manager for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT).
The Dunedin resident spent about 26 years before that in a similar role for the Department of Conservation, and said going into the corporate industry after more than three decades working for the Government was a refreshing change.
His work to advocate the values of heritage throughout the region was often met with opposition and was not without controversy.
Read more

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9.4.13 DCC sells Athenaeum, 23 The Octagon
9.6.12 City Property to compete more obviously in the market…
17.1.12 DCC living beyond its means [all spending and debt not declared]
21.2.11 The proactive heritage development lobby EXISTS in Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: odt.co.nz – Owen Graham, re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

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Doh, low growth for Dunedin

North Dunedin [flickriver.com] re-imaged 3North Dunedin [flickriver.com] re-imaged by whatifdunedin

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Census data tests planning assumptions
By Chris Morris
The Dunedin City Council will review some of the assumptions underpinning its planning efforts, after census data revealed slower-than-expected growth in the city. Council city development manager Dr Anna Johnson yesterday told the Otago Daily Times the city’s growth rate was lower than council planning had anticipated. The city’s resident population had increased from 118,683 in 2006 to 120,246 this year, which equated to annual growth of just 0.19%, she said. That was below 2006 expectations, which had anticipated annual growth of 0.4%, she said. ”The growth is slower than was expected or planned for, and it is lower than the estimates that we have been working with.” There was nothing in the data as yet to suggest the council should change urban development policies included in its spatial plan, which anticipated demand for an extra 7600 residential units in the city by 2031, Dr Johnson said.
Read more

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Cycle lobby games and media tilts

Bike commuter 1 [cycling.com]Commuters [cycling.com]

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Oct 2013
Leuchs accuses Vandervis
By Chris Morris
Dunedin city councillor Lee Vandervis has been accused of misrepresenting former Olympian Kashi Leuchs’ views on cycleways to ”push forward his own agenda” at a recent Dunedin City Council meeting.
However, Cr Vandervis hit back yesterday, denying the claim and saying any suggestion he did so deliberately was ”slanderous”.
Read more

Correspondence received.

—– Original Message —–
From: Lee Vandervis
To: Elizabeth Kerr
Sent: Saturday, October 19, 2013 1:51 PM
Subject: FW: reaction? Feel free to quote.

ODT reporter Chris Morris has muddied rather than clarified the issues around my supposed misrepresentation of statements made by serious cyclists, including an employee running the Bike Otago shop.

Even worse, the Bike Otago owner Kashi Leuchs who I have never met or discussed anything with, wades in to today’s ODT and on his blog pretending to be one of the blokes that I spoke with running his shop and pretending he took part in or heard the supposedly misrepresented conversation!
The millions we have already spent on Dunedin ‘painted on’ cycle lanes are now not what they want according to their blog, but they have no idea of how what they do want will work at intersections.
How much more do they want ratepayers to spend to reinvent the cycle lane?

Cheers,
Lee

—— Forwarded Message
From: Lee Vandervis
Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 13:31:04 +1300
To: Chris Morris [ODT]
Conversation: reaction?
Subject: Re: reaction?

First time this has been brought to my attention thanks Chris.

The Bike Otago blog confirms just what I said and that I accurately described these serious cyclists reservations about existing cycle lanes;

“So we would just like to put a little context to what Lee tells the council here. Lee states that we said that cycling lanes actually give cyclists a false sense of security… But what Lee has missed out is the words ‘painted on’. For sure, we, like almost all cyclists you ask are against the painted on cycling lanes, similar to what we currently have on our one way system.”

I did not miss out the words “painted on” as these words were never mentioned in the cycle-shop discussion, and ‘painted on’ is mostly what we have.

This still leaves the most dangerous part of any road – the intersections – as needing special provision which is often provided overseas by cyclists/pedestrian stop lights on separated cyclelane/footpaths.

The statement “What Lee states about intersections not being separable is not something that we would consider hard to fix… it would just take a bit of good planning to ensure everyone can enjoy the roads safely together.” fails to suggest just what planning/expense might reduce the latest car-park-lane separated cycleway intersection danger issue, and fails to give any overseas examples.

I have studied and photographed European cycleway solutions this year [at my own expense] in Munich, Barcelona, Heidelberg and Berlin and have spent weeks cycling around the last two cities. The most common cycleway solution in these cities is shared cycleway/footpaths separated from moving cars by parked cars. Next most common is our painted cycle lanes. Even when separated cycle-lanes/footpaths were marked with dividing lines, most serious cyclists [carbon fibre/lycra/commuter] still rode with the car traffic as this was faster and easier at intersections.
This highlights that there are many different cycling styles and preferences, and claims that a new separated car-park-lane cycleway will please most cyclists is misleading.

My question to the new enthusiasts for wiping out 200+ car-parks all the way up the one-way street and having a physically separated bicycle path along the car-parking strip, is why not use the under-used eastern footpath as a separated cycle lane, as recommended recently in the ODT by roading engineer Paul Hambleton, and which has plenty of relatively safe precedent overseas? I have previously asked staff to consider this overseas proven option, and had a Council resolution supporting this.
I believe we need a proven cost-effective compromise that recognises all road users as well as a variety of cyclists styles, from the recreational to the serious. So far my shared-eastern-foot-path solution is the only affordable one I have seen.

Cheers,
Lee

On 18/10/13 12:18 PM, “Chris Morris” wrote:

Hi Lee,

Not sure if you’re aware of the post about you on http://www.bikeotago.co.nz/

They’re taking issue with your earlier comments at a council meeting in September, when you claimed Bike Otago cyclists and the bloke that run the shop did not support cycleways.

I’d like your response by 5pm at the latest, but as soon as possible, actually, as I may need to do follow-ups.

Chris.

—— End of Forwarded Message

—— Forwarded Message
From: Lee Vandervis
Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 16:37:37 +1300
To: Chris Morris
Conversation: reaction?
Subject: Re: reaction?

Bike Otago’s own quotation “we, like almost all cyclists you ask are against the painted on cycling lanes,” confirms that they are opposed to current cycle lanes, and shows that I did not misquote them Chris.
Nobody specified ‘painted on’ at the time, but the news that theses cyclists are against the already considerable expensive Dunedin cycle lanes should be of wide interest.
If Bike Otago want to fully represent their views at Council on a new specific type of separated cycleway that has not yet been detailed, designed, intersection explained, or built, they are welcome to try and do so.

The record shows;
It was moved (Vandervis/Hudson):
“1 That the Council further consult with the AA on cycle safety proposals.
2 That the eastern footpath of the One Way North be considered as a long-term separated cycle way.”
A request was made to take each recommendation separately. Motion 1 was put and carried.
Motion 2 was put and carried with Cr MacTavish voting against.

that I have pushed for a much more affordable separated cycleway not requiring the loss of 200+ car-parks along the unused eastern footpath as regularly seen overseas. Whether Bike Otago approve of this or not is up to them to say.
I don’t have an own agenda other than to prevent an enormous waste of ratepayers and limited Transit funds on a new type of separated cycleway yet to be designed that does not address the statistically most dangerous intersections.
For you or anyone else to suggest that I deliberately misrepresented unnamed serious cyclists chatting in a cycle-shop is slanderous.

Kind regards,
Lee

Related Posts and Comments:
24.9.13 Mediocrity and lack of critical awareness at DCC
9.9.13 Residents’ dissatisfaction (2013) with elected council and mayor —increase!
4.9.13 Draft Dunedin City Transport Strategy
30.8.13 Transport Strategy: Is this responsible local government?

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Otago Museum, regional collaboration

Otago Museum, Animal Attic [nzmuseums.co.nz]Animal Attic, Otago Museum [nzmuseums.co.nz]

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Oct 2013
Cultural institution teamwork is the plan
By John Gibb
Otago Museum director Dr Ian Griffin is keen to join forces with other museums and cultural organisations in order to seek more Government funding for regional museums and similar institutions. He was invited to a private lunch attended by Prime Minister John Key during a visit to Dunedin last month and, with the help of National list MP Michael Woodhouse, Dr Griffin had the chance to briefly raise the funding topic.
Read more

****

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Oct 2013
Museum job applicants high quality director says
By John Gibb
Otago Museum director Dr Ian Griffin is pleased with the ”high quality” of applicants for the museum’s vacant commercial director role, during a time of ”significant change” at the institution. Museum officials said about 18 people had applied. Dr Griffin said a new commercial director would soon be appointed, but there could be a delay of a month or slightly more, depending on any notice period required at any previous job for the successful applicant.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Demolishing serious mistakes

Wayne County jail crushed [myfoxdetroit.com][Rebuilding Awatea Street?]

### myfoxdetroit.com Oct 17, 2013 11:03 AM Updated: Oct 18, 2013 2:40 AM
Wayne County’s new jail being turned into a pile of rubble
By Charlie LeDuff – FOX 2 News
DETROIT (WJBK) — So I’m driving by the Wayne County Jail and – look – what are they doing? Working on it again? Nope.

They’re taking it apart.

And where are they taking it? They’re bringing it to be crushed up into dust. $404 million dollars – WASTED.

We’ve told you for two years that this thing was going to be over budget and not be big enough. They’ve already sunk $200 million into it – plus interest. Don’t forget the interest. $404 million. So what’s the answer? They’re crushing it. They’re crushing it without having told the county commission, the news media and most importantly: the taxpaying public.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: myfoxdetroit.com – Wayne County jail crushed

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DCC: Final vote tally + St Clair boat ramp

Emperors new clothes [catherinewhite.files.wordpress.com] re-imaged 1

### ODT Online Fri, 18 Oct 2013
Final tally increases mayor’s vote margin
By Chris Morris
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull extended his victory margin slightly when the Dunedin City Council’s final election results were released yesterday.
The figures, which added about 340 special votes not previously included, saw Mr Cull’s tally in the mayoral race rise by 158 votes, from 18,446 to 18,604. That meant his winning margin was extended by 113 votes, from 12,017 to 12,130, over nearest rivals Hilary Calvert (now with 6474 votes) and Cr Lee Vandervis (5872).
The final results saw small increases in the votes cast for all nine mayoral candidates, as well as the city’s 14 elected councillors.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
13.10.13 Pressuring Cull and his GD Party . . .
3.10.13 Exercise your right to VOTE
29.9.13 Alert: Dunedin voters —Mayors gain more powers

Council roading maintenance engineer Peter Standring said the first rock placement was included in the already documented $500,000 cost of immediately fixing [the] problem. The rocks placed this week cost about $60,000. Consultants hired by the council to look into the problem plan to report to the council next week, and may be required to do more work.

### ODT Online Fri, 18 Oct 2013
Start on Esplanade boat ramp close
By Debbie Porteous
The Dunedin City Council will begin building a temporary rescue boat launching ramp at the north end of the St Clair Beach sea wall next week, after this week dumping another 1000 tonnes of rock along the wall. The ramp is to run from the north end of the Esplanade down to the beach, and will be used by the St Clair Surf Lifesaving Club to get its inflatable rescue boats to the water. The club lost its original concrete ramp after the sea wall near the ramp was undermined and the fill behind the wall sucked out to sea earlier this year.
A consent application was lodged, but the ramp would be built at the same time as the application progressed, as it needed to be in place for the start of beach patrols at the end of this month.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
26.5.13 [bad news] St Clair seawall #FAIL
25.6.13 DCC Annual Plan 2013/14

Campbell Live 17.6.13 [screenshot 1a]Campbell Live 17.6.13 [screenshot 2a]Campbell Live 17.6.13 [screenshot view1]St Clair sea wall, Campbell Live (TV3) 17.6.13 [screenshots]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image (top) – Emperors new clothes [catherinewhite.files.wordpress.com] re-imaged by whatifdunedin

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NZRU, ORFU blasphemies etc

● The Trusts Charitable Foundation (TTCF Inc) ● The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd (TTCF Ltd) ● Otago Rugby Football Union (ORFU) ● Professional Rugby ● Centre of Excellence for Amateur Sport ● Harness Racing ● Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) ● Gambling Commission ● Pokies ● Rorts ● Organised Crime ● Serious Fraud ● Political Interference

NZRU logo

### ODT Online Tue, 15 Oct 2013
ORFU report to stay confidential
By Hamish McNeilly
A confidential report following the financial collapse of the Otago Rugby Football Union is likely to remain confidential.
The Dunedin City Council agreed to write off a debt of more than $400,000 and Dunedin Venues Management Ltd a debt of $80,000 to help the union avoid liquidation in March last year.
The New Zealand Rugby Union, which lent the cash-strapped union $500,000, commissioned a report by Cascade Consulting to look at the union’s involvement with pokie grants.
The report was later supplied to the Department of Internal Affairs, which declined to release the documents on the grounds it ”would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information”.

”The department does not consider the withholding of the report on ORFU provided by NZRU would diminish public confidence in the department as a responsible regulator of the gambling sector and does not consider that these reasons for withholding the information are outweighed by other considerations which render it desirable, in the public interest, to make the information available.” –DIA

The Otago Daily Times lodged a complaint with the office of the Ombudsman on July 25, 2012, asking for the release of the information.
Chief Ombudsman Dame Beverley Wakem, in a provisional opinion released this week, said the department was entitled to withhold the information.
Read more

For more information at this site, enter terms such as *dia*, *sfo*, *oag*, *orfu*, *martin legge*, *ttcf*, *russell garbutt*, *pokies* or *pokierorts” in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: New chief financial officer

### dunedintv.co.nz October 14, 2013 – 6:36pm
DCC appoints new chief financial officer
The DCC has appointed the University of Otago’s director of financial services, a former Allied Press accountant, as its chief financial officer.
Grant McKenzie [ODT files]Grant McKenzie has been chosen for the newly created role, with responsibility for the management of the council’s group finances.
A graduate of the University of Otago, McKenzie has a Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in accounting, is a chartered accountant, and a member of the Institute of Directors.
His role will include the provision of financial advice and support to the board of Dunedin City Holdings Limited, which looks after the council’s group of companies.
Ch39 Link

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Group Chief Financial Officer Appointed

This item was published on 14 Oct 2013.

The University of Otago’s Director of Financial Services, Grant McKenzie, has been appointed as the Dunedin City Council’s Group Chief Financial Officer (GCFO).

Announcing the appointment of Mr McKenzie to this newly-created role, DCC Chief Executive Paul Orders says, “Grant will bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the role and will be instrumental in ensuring the effective and efficient management of DCC group finances.”

Mr McKenzie is a graduate of the University. He has a Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in accounting, and is a Chartered Accountant. He is also a member of the Institute of Directors.

For the past eight and a half years, Mr McKenzie has been the University’s Director of Financial Services. In this role he has been responsible for the overall accounting function for the University and the wider University group.

Mr McKenzie is a director for several subsidiary companies within the University group, including the University of Otago Foundation Studies Limited, Unipol Recreation Limited and University Union Limited. He is also an elected trustee of the New Zealand University Superannuation Scheme.

Before working at the University, Mr McKenzie was the Group Accountant at Allied Press Limited. He has also worked for Dunedin business advisory firm Taylor McLachlan.

Mr McKenzie says, ”I’m very pleased to have been appointed to the role and look forward to the new challenges ahead.”

The new position of Group Chief Financial Officer replaces the DCC’s Chief Financial Officer (currently a vacant post),with the role expanded to include the provision of financial advice and support to the Board of Dunedin City Holdings Limited (DCHL). The role will also create more cohesive financial management between the DCC and Dunedin City Holdings Limited. Twenty eight applications were received for the position, from New Zealand and overseas.

DCHL Chair Graham Crombie says, “I’m really pleased Grant is joining us and look forward to having his experience and ideas around the table.”

The current position of Chief Executive of DCHL will be disestablished when Mr McKenzie takes up his GCFO role in late January. Mr Crombie says the significant contribution of DCHL Chief Executive Bevan Dodds will be recognised and an appropriate handover arranged.

Contact Chief Executive, Dunedin City Council on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
21.3.13 DCC: Opportunity created by Stephens’ departure
15.3.13 DCC: Stephens gone. It took way too long.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stadium: ORC repayments

### ODT Online Sun, 13 Oct 2013
ORC’s share of stadium almost paid
By Dan Hutchinson
The Otago Regional Council is on track to repay its share of the Forsyth Barr Stadium construction costs in less than half the time it originally expected.
The council committed $37.5 million towards the stadium, some of the funds coming from special Port Otago dividends and the rest from residents paying targeted rates from July 1, 2009.

● ORC takes $2.8 million a year from ratepayers for the stadium — that equates to $32 on the rates bill for an average-price Dunedin property ($270,000).
● DCC ratepayers will be paying stadium rates for about another 18 years.

Yesterday Mr Scott confirmed that the next financial year would be the last that people would have to pay the full stadium rate, with only $1 million left to pay in the 2015-16 year. He said the council thought at one stage it could make next year the last year for payments but a slight upward shift in interest rates delayed that.
Read more

ORC

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Pressuring Cull and his GD Party . . .

Full council voting figures here (via DCC website)

The local newspaper styles Cull’s return as mayor as a “crushing victory”.
This is the mayor who in the immediate past term continued to spend ratepayer dollars —sinking the council deeper in debt, failing to turn the city’s fortunes around. Cull led a council without ability to look rationally, prudently and conservatively at city finances. Lots of you brought him back. Cull fails to be transparent, lacks accountability, and often appears weak in adversity. If he can muster his Greater Dunedin ‘Party’ votes, expect more of same —however, with the return of Cr Lee Vandervis and timely arrival of new councillors Hilary Calvert and Doug Hall, Liability Cull better keep his helmet on.

Calvert Hall VandervisCrs Hilary Calvert, Doug Hall, Lee Vandervis

Dave Cull, helmet [odt.co.nz]ODT: Figures reveal Cull’s crushing victory
Dunedin mayor Dave Cull thrashed his nearest challenger by 12,000 votes, voting figures reveal. Because of the STV system, Dunedin’s voting figures are released later than other other authorities so the margin of Mr Cull’s victory was not immediately apparent. The figures now released show he polled 18,446 votes while his nearest challenger Hilary Calvert could manage only 6429. High-profile councillor Lee Vandervis was third with 5841 votes. Among the other challengers Andrew Whiley polled 2946 votes, Aaron Hawkins 2900, Pete George 779, Olivier Lequex 503 and Kevin Dwyer 217. Read more + Video

ODT: Voters endorse Southern mayors
Southern mayors have been told to keep up the good work by voters who have returned incumbents to office across much of the lower South Island.
In Dunedin, Mayor Dave Cull fended off a challenge from eight rivals, led by former Act New Zealand MP Hilary Calvert and followed by incumbent Dunedin city councillor Lee Vandervis. Mr Cull told the Otago Daily Times it was “really gratifying to get the confidence of the community reinforced”. Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Dave Cull, detail [ODT files]

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DVML works media/DCC to spend more ratepayer money

Dunedin Venues Management Ltd (DVML) has been testing the stadium sound system since February, and has discovered it is only working at 20% of what is needed.

Queries about the sound system were only some of a barrage of questions from Dunedin city councillors before they adopted the annual reports of DVML and Dunedin Venues Ltd this week.

### ODT Online Sat, 12 Oct 2013
Stadium PA fix up to $800,000
By Debbie Porteous
Permanently fixing problems with Forsyth Barr Stadium’s public address system would cost between $500,000 and $800,000.
DVML chief executive Darren Burden said the cost did not include permanently fixing sound issues with the wider auditorium, such as those experienced at concerts. They would continue to be addressed by temporary measures installed by promoters.
He said DVML had been working with acoustic engineers and sound system experts, including the company that installed the system. There were problems with the transmission of sound from microphones on the pitch to the sound box that delivered sound to speakers around the stadium.
The solutions, which ranged in price depending on what standard of sound delivery was wanted, involved improving the sound transmission from the field and installing more speakers around the stadium.
The cost of fixing it had to be dealt with internally by DVML.
Read more

****

Darren Burden, DVML [odt.co.nz]Head in the Sand Award?
Cr Richard Thomson said he appreciated Mr Burden (pictured) might wonder why he bothered when faced with such a barrage of questions from councillors. ”But it is really important for the city that this delivers as much revenue as possible.” (via ODT)

Comment at ODT Online:

Who is accountable?
Submitted by russandbev on Sat, 12/10/2013 – 9:06am.

Just another example of the difference between reality and hype. Ratepayers have been assured since the building of this rugby stadium that the PA system was state of the art. Indeed, the hype from the Carisbrook Stadium Trust before the build indicated that it was even better than that. Now ratepayers are told that it will cost the best part of a million to get right for the most basic of requirements, and that the costs of running the stadium will rise. Who is being held accountable? Not those responsible for this ongoing shambles, but only the ratepayers.

Related Posts and Comments:
7.10.13 DCC councillors, no idea of annual cost of owning and operating…
4.10.13 DVML . . . | ‘Make the stadium work’ losses continue
20.8.13 DVML foists invoices on DCC
20.6.13 Stadium: DVML, DVL miserable losers! #grandtheftdebt
30.12.12 To DVML Board, from Ian Tayor [sic]
11.12.12 Stadium: DCC runs amok with $750K annual subsidy to DVML
2.11.12 Stadium financials: Calvin Oaten on DVML, DVL and DCHL
2.11.12 Stadium financials: JimmyJones v Peter Hutchison (DVML)…
19.10.12 LGOIMA request: Breakdown of DVML recruitment costs [emails]
19.10.12 Weak boys, Cull and Burden on rugby stadium
11.10.12 Darren Burden plays LGOIMA game like Davies #DVML #PsychoAnswer

For more, enter the terms *dvml*, *darren burden* or *stadium* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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New Zealand: Pokie trusts same everywhere #pokierorts

● The Trusts Charitable Foundation (TTCF Inc) ● The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd (TTCF Ltd) ● Otago Rugby Football Union (ORFU) ● Professional Rugby ● Centre of Excellence for Amateur Sport ● Harness Racing ● Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) ● Gambling Commission ● Pokies ● Rorts ● Organised Crime ● Serious Fraud ● Political Interference

### NZ Herald Online Tuesday 8 October 2013
Super City elections 2013: West’s ‘ugly’ culture has Tamihere fuming
By Steve Deane
Colourful talk radio host MP John Tamihere wants to change what he sees as liquor trusts’ unhealthy monopoly from the inside but they defend set-up as democracy in action, saying proportion of payouts to turnover is about to pick up.

[pub crawl ensues in West Auckland – see full article]
What we’ve just seen [on the crawl], he says, is an example of how West Auckland’s alcohol licensing trusts use their control of the region’s pubs to maximise gambling revenue through pokies. The gambling money, he says, is then used to peddle influence and spread pro-trust propaganda, which reinforces the position of the liquor trusts.

The West’s drinkers are suckers, says Tamihere. They pay over the odds for their booze at the trusts’ bottle stores, are forced to drink in dives and are subjected to banks of pokies when they do. “It’s an ugly drinking culture,” says Tamihere. “It sets up a false world where the leadership of the trusts can make out that we don’t have any drinking problems out West. That is because we migrate them into town or over on to the Shore. No right-minded youth or family will go out anywhere in the West because they are dives. The culture has been perverted by the way the trusts just want to monopolise pokies.” Tamihere wants to get elected so he can change things from the inside. But is change really necessary? Like many things involving the colourful talk radio host, the answer is not straightforward.

Two weeks later we take another tour, this time with Ross Clow, the long-serving president of the Portage Licensing Trust and chairman of The Trusts Community Foundation.

As well as rebutting Tamihere’s ugly drinking culture claims, Clow’s aim is to show where the money from the liquor trusts’ combined $100 million turnover is going. Money, it will surprise no one, is at the heart of this issue. TTCF’s accounts show it paid $10.57 million in pokie revenue to West Auckland causes last year. Clow stands firmly by the claim that 97 per cent of the cash raised out West is returned to the West. He should know. As president of the Portage trust he is responsible for making the recommendations to TTCF on how money raised in its venues should be spent. Given he is also chairman of TTCF, Clow could be accused of making recommendations to himself. He defends the system as a sound way of making sure the money goes to the right places and insists he recuses himself when TTCF votes on Portage’s recommendations.

Tamihere disputes figures surrounding the return of money to West Auckland, but says he won’t be able to prove his case until he gets access to the trusts’ full accounts. “If I have to go to the High Court to break it open I will,” he says. “There is something not right here. I know my community. There is nothing like that being spent out here.”

Then there is the question of who really distributes the money. For years statements issued by the liquor licensing trusts have indicated the money comes from them. It doesn’t. It comes from TTCF, which is a separate financial entity.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
10.10.13 Whistleblowers’ message heard ??! #OtagoRacingClub #pokierorts
1.8.13 Politicians keeping DIA/SFO quiet on ORFU and TTCF #pokierorts
21.2.13 DIA, SFO investigation #pokierorts
11.11.12 Department of Internal Affairs #pokierorts #coverup #TTCF
25.7.12 Martin Legge backgrounds TTCF (pokie trust) and Portage and Waitakere Licensing Trusts #DIA

For more, enter terms such as *pokies*, *pokierorts*, *dia*, *sfo* or *ttcf* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Whistleblowers’ message heard ??! #OtagoRacingClub #pokierorts

### ODT Online Thu, 10 Oct 2013
Racing: ‘Sound’ result for Otago RC despite difficult circumstances
By Matt Smith
Otago Racing Club president Dean Lawrence has one request for this season – a little less rain, please. Lawrence, who was re-elected unopposed as president at the club’s annual meeting last night, rued the bad weather which plagued the first half of his maiden tenure as he presented his annual report to the committee at Wingatui last night. The loss of a race meeting due to bad weather at the start of last season got the club’s season off on the wrong foot and the bad luck continued with wet and cold conditions on Melbourne Cup day and Boxing Day, Lawrence said.
Read more

Excerpt, ODT 10.10.13 (page 20):
ODT 10.10.13 Otago Racing Club (excerpt) page 20

Related Posts and Comments:
1.8.13 Politicians keeping DIA/SFO quiet on ORFU and TTCF #pokierorts
21.2.13 DIA, SFO investigation #pokierorts

For more, enter terms such as *pokies*, *pokierorts*, *dia* or *sfo* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Voting Closes on Saturday

Vote 1

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Don’t Forget – Voting Closes on Saturday

This item was published on 07 Oct 2013.

It’s time to get those papers in – voting for the local body elections closes on Saturday.

If you haven’t already sent your voting papers in, now is the time to fill them out and return them. The elections are held by postal vote and papers must be mailed or delivered in time to be received by 12 noon on Election Day, Saturday 12 October.

Wednesday [was] the last recommended date for posting to ensure voting papers are received in time, but people can drop them in at the Civic Centre until Saturday.

The Electoral Officer for the Dunedin City Council, the Otago Regional Council and the Southern District Health Board, Pam Jordan, says if you have not received voting papers, you can cast a special vote.

The best way to do this now is to visit the Special Voting Booth in the Plaza Meeting Room in the Civic Centre. The booth is open Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5pm, and also on Saturday morning.

Ms Jordan says fewer people have voted so far than at the same point in the past three elections. As of Friday, 18.65% of voting papers for this area had been returned, compared with 28.44% for the same period in 2010.

Daily voting paper returns can be seen at http://www.electionz.com/elections/lgereturns/ELT71DU13_returns.htm

Contact Electoral Officer, Dunedin City Council on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
10.10.13 LGNZ: Local authority election results (advisory)
3.10.13 Exercise your right to VOTE

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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LGNZ: Local authority election results (advisory)

Received by Mayors, Chairs and Chief Executives
Tuesday, 8 October 2013 9:39 a.m.

Local Government New Zealand
MEDIA ADVISORY
Local authority election results – Saturday 12 October 2013

Voting for local authority elections closes at midday on Saturday 12 October. Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) will have a selection of election results available to the media from mid-afternoon on 12 October as follows:

LGNZ info[click to enlarge]

Information on past election results is currently available on LGNZ’s website.

****

Media contact and spokespeople
To request any of the above information or to arrange an interview, please contact Helen Mexted, LGNZ’s Director of Advocacy on 029 924 1221.

The following LGNZ spokespeople will be available to provide media commentary pre and post the election results:

Lawrence Yule – LGNZ President
Lawrence previously represented the Provincial Sector on the National Council. He has been Mayor of Hastings District since 2001, where he also won the honour of being Hastings District’s youngest Mayor. He continues to be at the forefront of not only district, but regional initiatives.

Malcolm Alexander – LGNZ Chief Executive
Malcolm has successfully led LGNZ through a significant period of recent change. He leads the organisation’s day-to-day management, relationships with its members and other stakeholders, and strategy and policy development. Malcolm was previously at Genesis Energy where he held the position of General Manager, Corporate Affairs. He was a member of the Board of the New Zealand Council for Infrastructure Development between 2008 and 2012 and was the Independent Chair of the Telecommunications Carriers’ Forum between 2002 and 2008.

****

About LGNZ and local government in New Zealand
Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) is the peak body representing New Zealand’s 78 local, regional and unitary authorities. LGNZ advocates for local democracy, develops local government policy, and promotes best practice and excellence in leadership, governance and service delivery. Through its work strengthening sector capability, LGNZ contributes to the economic success and vibrancy of communities and the nation.

The local government sector plays an important role. In addition to giving citizens a say in how their communities are run, councils own a broad range of community assets worth more than $120 billion. These include 90 per cent of New Zealand’s road network, the bulk of the country’s water and waste water networks, and libraries, recreation and community facilities. Council expenditure is approximately $8.5 billion dollars, representing approximately 4 per cent of Gross Domestic Product and 11 per cent of all public expenditure.

For more information visit: www.lgnz.co.nz

Download:
LGNZ Media Advisory Local Authority Elections Announcement
(PDF, 280 KB)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC councillors, no idea annual cost of owning, operating FB Stadium

Updated 2013/10/08 at 10:47 am.

DCC departing councillors [ODT Files 8.10.13] 1Platitudes — and much more, including seriously remiss untruths about the ‘value’ of councillor contributions — flew at yesterday’s city council meeting. Dunedin City Council members farewelled five long-serving councillors at their final meeting: Neil Collins, Syd Brown,
Bill Acklin, Fliss Butcher and Colin Weatherall.

Councillors said Cr Brown was a fair-minded and trusted member, a consistently hard worker who made a ”very substantial” contribution, especially on financial issues and as a strong advocate for Mosgiel, in his 15 years on council. ”He is a wise old owl. When he speaks, I listen and know we all do,” Cr Collins said.

Read more at ODT Online.

——————

Comment received.

JimmyJones
Submitted on 2013/10/07 at 6:31 pm

The average DCC councillor still has no idea of the annual cost of owning and operating the FB Stadium. They have been misled by the way the annual reports are arranged and they get confused because there are two stadium companies with similar names, as well as an interest cost to the DCC for the loan to buy the shares to buy the stadium.

Jim Harland, Paul Orders and their staff have been asked many times to disclose the total financial impact of the stadium. Mr Orders eventually promised to do this at an annual plan public meeting, but it hasn’t happened.

The annual reports of the stadium companies (DVL & DVML) to be approved today by our hapless councillors, have enough info to calculate a good estimate of the total cost.

These figures are from the annual reports page 6 (DVL) and page 9 (DVML). Remember that in these reports the term “subvention payment” means “subsidy” and has the effect of disguising the size of the companies’ losses. The city’s renters and ratepayers end up paying for both the disclosed losses and the subsidies so we need to add them together to get the total impact.

Total Stadium Impact:
Item:___Disclosed Loss_____Subsidy_______Total Loss
DVL:______$4.8 million______$7.3 million_______$12.1 million
DVML:_____$1.0 million______$0.6 million_______$1.5 million
Cost of interest on debt for DVL shares:________$5.1 million
Cost of rates subsidy for DVML (approx):_______$2.0 million
Total Ratepayer Impact (approx):_______$20.7 million

The DCC held stadium debt is $78 million and I have chosen the interest rate to be 6.5%. There might be some other costs that I haven’t thought of. The actual interest rates paid by DVL seems unrealistically low to me at 5.87%. Most DCC projects are charged 7.00%, so DVL’s low interest rate could amount to a secret subsidy of $1.6 million.

Anyway, $20.7 million per year is a lot of money and citizens and councillors need to know what is going on. We have heard DCC mayors and councillors promise financial transparency, but it seems that some of them have wanted to keep this figure quiet.

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: odt.co.nz – departing city councillors who brought you the stadium, one way or the other . . .

19 Comments

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