Tag Archives: Design

rough sheds, sydney london

Tinshed by Raffaello Rosselli
Amy Frearson | 21 June 2013 ● Dezeen
Australian architect Raffaello Rosselli has repurposed a corroding tin shed in Sydney to create a small office and studio apartment. Rather than replace the crumbling structure, Raffaello Rosselli chose to retain the rusty corrugated cladding of the two-storey building so that from the outside it looks mostly unchanged. The project embraces that it will continue to change with time through rust, decay and repair.

“The humble tin shed is an iconic Australian structure,” he explains. “As the only remaining shed in the area it is a unique reminder of the suburb’s industrial past.”

The architect began by taking the building apart and replacing its old skeleton with a modern timber frame. He then reattached the cladding over three facades, allowing room for three new windows. The frames of the windows are made from sheets of Corten steel that display the same orange tones as the retained facade.

“The materials have been left raw and honest, in the spirit of its industrial economy,” adds Rosselli. In contrast with the exterior, the inside of the building has a clean finish with white walls and plywood floors in both the ground-floor living space and the first-floor office.
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*Photography by Mark Syke, apart from where otherwise indicated.

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Collage House, London

Dezeen Published on Feb 13, 2017
Movie explores Jonathan Tuckey’s home in a 19th-century workshop 14 years on
Filmmaker Tapio Snellman has documented the ageing process of architect Jonathan Tuckey’s home, 14 years after he overhauled a 19th-century London workshop to create it. The architect, who is the founder of London-based firm Jonathan Tuckey Design, renovated and extended the steel fabricator’s workshop in 2002 to create a unique home for his family and their dog. He left the bare brick walls tarnished with black marks and chose “simple and everyday” materials to rejuvenate the character of the building, but also because they would weather well. Snellman, who shot Collage House in 2016, captures the ageing of these materials – including nicks and scratches on a series metal fixture and doors by splitting the screen into four – a trick he repeats throughout his film. “The split-screen sequences talk about the occupants and about the way architecture is integrated seamlessly with family life and personal expression,” Snellman told Dezeen. “The four simultaneous views create one strong spatial impression without any single image dominating the effect,” he told Dezeen. Both moving and fixed larch plywood panels clad the exterior, while beach plywood sheeting used as a floor lining inside the house, along with a concrete covering. Douglas fir stud work was planed and left exposed to partition spaces. This enables zones of activity to be defined, while also maintaining openness throughout.

Movie explores Jonathan Tuckey’s home in a former London steel workshop
Eleanor Gibson | 13 February 2017 ● Dezeen
This photography taken by James Brittain when the project completed in the early 2000s shows how Tuckey overhauled the industrial building by partially demolishing walls to create a central courtyard. “Plywood has weathered beautifully on both the interior and exterior and the scuff marks of 15 years use now tell the personal story of the family,” Tuckey told Dezeen. “The concrete floors have patinated and subsequently become more beautiful,” he continued. “The exposed brick was already there but continued to age gracefully as it was used to hang pictures and the kids used it to draw on it.” A space that forms a central part of Snellman’s film is the open-plan kitchen-cum-dining room, which occupies the former workshop. Here, he captures diagonal patterns of light that floods in through the long skylight between the original wooden bowstring beams restored by Tuckey. Snellman contrasts colour footage with black and white in the film, as well as tracking members of the family through the house. “The very controlled track shots try to eliminate the viewers awareness of the presence of the camera, as if the space would be seen at its most intimate, when no-one is present,” the filmmaker told Dezeen.

Ground floor plan [click to enlarge]

First floor plan

When renovating the building, Tuckey’s aim was to maintain as many of the building’s existing features as possible, while also creating plenty of playful spaces that catered to his then-young children. He divided the long and narrow building, which widens at the southern end, into three parts. He also demolished one of the existing buildings to create a courtyard and a small pond. The entrance hall and living area occupy the northern end with a mezzanine above, while the kitchen-cum-dining room occupies the central space. A walkway links these spaces to the two-storey structure added to the southern side, which houses the bedrooms and a bathroom. Since the original renovation, Tuckey has reconfigured the arrangement of the bedrooms, as his now teenage daughters needed more space. The children’s bedrooms have moved upstairs from the downstairs, while the single room used by the parents was divided into two interconnected rooms. A pair of hatches in the bedrooms open to the rooftop terrance, which was also only recently completed by the designer.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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iD Dunedin Fashion runway events

Otago Polytechnic Published on Mar 23, 2017
2017 iD International Emerging Designer Awards
Otago Polytechnic is proud to be a sponsor of the iD Dunedin Fashion Week. One of our favourite events is, of course, the iD International Emerging Designer Awards. In this coveted competition, students from Otago Polytechnic compete against others from around the world – this year there are 33 finalists. It’s Australasia’s largest emerging fashion design competition, and this year it’s at Dunedin’s historic railway station. For more info about studying fashion at Otago Polytechnic, rated in the world’s top 50 fashion schools, check out http://www.op.ac.nz/fashion

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At Twitter:

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ID Dunedin Fashion
March 23, 2017

Australian Finalist takes out 13th iD International Emerging Designers Awards
A stand-out Australian emerging designer collection that reinvents archetypal garments including the biker jacket and blazer has won tonight’s 13th annual iD International Emerging Designer Awards held at the Dunedin Railway Station in New Zealand. Australian-based Nehma Vitols from Sydney’s University of Technology tonight took out the H&J Smith $6,000 First Place prize with her collection, ‘XXX’ – described by judges as “inspired”, merging new fabric technology with handcraft while deconstructing familiar silhouettes in an entirely unique way. Paper, silk and cotton merge to form hybrid materials that oscillate between two and three dimensions and between garment and sculpture. During Vitol’s fashion education, the former student from the University of Technology, Sydney, was selected to participate in the Woolmark Global Studio Program in China and the Textile Print Global Studio in Pukshar, India. Alongside her Bachelor of Design, she completed a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies.
The judging panel made up of Tania Carlson, NOM*d’s Margi Robertson, Marc Moore from Stolen Girlfriends Club, Australian fashion editor Georgina Safe, and iD’s international guest for 2017 Paulo Melim Andersson say the standard of finalists at this year’s event was very high. An overriding focus of the designers was on the ocean with aquatic inspired collections and a renewed focus on sustainability. Says Andersson: “All of the collections are a result of research and a commitment to new ideas. There was little evidence of international referencing and instead each finalist created their own vision in a collection that was fresh, unique and original.”
Hosted by ZM’s PJ Harding and Jase Hawkins, 29 international emerging designer collections showed at [last] night’s 13th annual event, supported by Otago Polytechnic.

This year’s winners are:
● The H&J Smith First Prize ($6000) Nehma Vitols, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
● Laffare Second Place ($4000): Lila John, University of Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria
● Gallery De Novo 3rd Place ($2000): Paul Castro, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
● The Fabric Store Award for Excellence in Design worth $3000 (includes $2000 fabric): Tess Norquay, Massey University, Wellington, NZ
● Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall Most Commercial Collection Prize ($1000): Talia Jimenez University of Technology Sydney, Australia
● The NZME and Viva Editorial Prize (awarded to best NZ collection): Megan Stewart, Massey University, Wellington, NZ.
● The Emilia Wickstead Internship: Emily Cameron, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia.

Backstage, Dr Margo Barton from the Otago Polytechnic School of Design and a team of students was in charge of managing the Awards, while Dunedin-based salon Klone Hair, led by Danelle and Karl Radel, took charge of the runway hair creations. Makeup looks for the models, supplied by Aart Model Management and 10 international models from the University of Shanghai Engineering Science, were created by the Revlon sponsored makeup team, led by Christal Allpress.
iD Dunedin Fashion Week is supported by the Dunedin City Council. iD Link

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Talented Swedish designer Paulo Melim Andersson is the International Guest Judge for this month’s iD Dunedin Emerging Designer Awards on 23 March. Andersson has designed for top European fashion houses Chloé, Marni Margiela and Zadig & Voltaire during his fashion career and he will show a retrospective collection at the iD Dunedin Fashion Shows at the Dunedin Railway Station on 24 & 25 March. Read more

Paulo Melim Andersson – Chloé 2007 [via fashionnz.co.nz]

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C U R R E N T ● E X H I B I T I O N

17-30 March – MUSE at Gallery De Novo, Stuart St, Dunedin
Dunedin artist Suzy Platt’s fashion illustrations are on show at Gallery De Novo in her new exhibition ‘Muse’. Suzy’s paintings recently caught the attention of renowned British photographer Nick Knight who asked her to illustrate the Haute Couture collections at Paris Fashion Week. The illustrations can also be viewed in London at the SHOWstudio Gallery.

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5.3.17 iD Dunedin Fashion Week 2017 [includes videos]

Posted by Elizbeth Kerr

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iD Dunedin Fashion Week 2017

Received.

From: iD Dunedin Fashion
Sent: Sunday, 5 March 2017 10:42 a.m.
To: Elizabeth Kerr
Subject: Just two weeks to go until iD Fashion Week 2017! 💋❤👠💅😍

[excerpts]

id-dunedin-fashion-week-2017

TWO WEEKS UNTIL iD DUNEDIN FASHION WEEK 2017!
With a full calendar of events designed to send you into fashion heaven, iD Dunedin Fashion Week 2017 kicks off on Saturday March 18, 2017! Featuring exhibitions, designer talks, runway shows, open design studios in the iD Hub at Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall, and more, Dunedin is set to come alive with an amazing fashion week.

Tickets are still available from Ticketmaster for iD’s premier shows – the iD International Emerging Designer Awards and the iD Fashion Show at the Dunedin Railway Station.

Secure your seats today!

id-international-emerging-designers

iD INTERNATIONAL EMERGING AWARDS TO MOVE TO DUNEDIN RAILWAY STATION

This year’s iD International Emerging Designer Awards will be moved from the Dunedin Town Hall to the Dunedin Railway Station giving emerging finalists from around the world an opportunity to be part of the unique Railway platform runway experience associated with iD’s premier Fashion Show.

“This is an outstanding opportunity for these young designers to be more integrated with the overall events of iD Fashion Week,” says iD Committee Chair Cherry Lucas.

“Experiencing the magic of iD’s iconic runway show at the Railway Station as a new designer is exciting and unique. And for iD audiences, this is a fabulous opportunity to see the platform runway reinvented through the iD Awards, with all its distinctive, edgy and experimental qualities that people love to see.”

The venue will also enhance the audience’s experience, giving fashion lovers a closer look at the designs, say organisers.

“I’m so excited for the audience,” says Otago Polytechnic Professor of Fashion Dr Margo Barton.

“I get to see these creations up close every year but I never cease to be amazed by the creative talent out there. For the first time the audience will have that up-close experience too.”
Ms Lucas says the move to the Railway has also helped reduce set up time.

“This is the first year that we have had a large cruise ship visit on the day of our Railway Show. A growing number of logistical challenges were developing and it was decided that by bringing the set-up forward a day, many of the logistical challenges we were facing could be avoided or reduced.”

Ticketmaster and the iD team are working together to ensure all the current ticket holders receive similar seating to what has been purchased for the new venue. Current ticket holders will be contacted by Ticketmaster.

The iD International Emerging Designer Awards is supported by the principal partner for the event, the Otago Polytechnic.

iDFW insider Published on Mar 2, 2017
Meet 2017 iD Awards finalist Zhuxuan He
Meet University of Technology Sydney fashion graduate Zhuxuan He as she prepares for the 2017 iD International Emerging Designer Awards to be held in Dunedin, New Zealand in March.

CHECK OUT THE iD HUB AT DUNEDIN’S GOLDEN CENTRE MALL
As iD’s major sponsor, Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall becomes the iD Hub every year, holding meet and greet experiences with international guests and awards winners, alongside catwalk shows, VIP events and shopping experiences. Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall is the city’s most fashionable retail space, with shops such as Hype, I Love Paris, Storm, Ziera, and Platypus offering shoppers fabulous clothing and shoes from New Zealand and abroad. The Golden Centre has been a major partner with iD for the past seven years.

This year’s Hub offerings include an open studio from the Otago Polytechnic’s School of Design, meet-and-greets with iD awards winners on Friday March 24, and many more events that you’ll find at www.idfashion.co.nz.

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O T H E R ● V I D E O S

iDFW insider Published on Feb 15, 2017
iD Fashion week 2017 – Teaser
The 13th annual iD International Emerging Designer Awards will take place during iD Fashion Week (Dunedin, NZ) 18 – 26 March 2017. One of this year’s 35 international finalists Cecily Reed (a graduate of the Otago Polytechnic) shares some of her designs for the Awards.

iDFW insider Published on Oct 18, 2016
iD Fashion Show 2016
Set along one of the world’s longest catwalks on the platform of Dunedin’s historic Railway Station, the iD Fashion Show 2016 featured UK-based designer Emilia Wickstead, alongside top Kiwi designers including Kate Sylvester, Zambesi, NOM*d, Carlson, Company of Strangers, Mild-Red and Charmaine Reveley.

OtagoDailyTimes Published on Mar 17, 2016
Dunedin iD International Emerging Designer Awards
iD International Emerging Designer Awards is New Zealand’s largest fashion design competition and a highlight of the iD Dunedin Fashion Week. Thirty finalists have been selected from a field of over 90 applications from some of the world’s most prestigious design schools. All finalists will be in Dunedin to present their collection and vie for the cash prizes, internships and other benefits provided to the winning designers.

Channel 39 Published on May 1, 2016
Dunedin International Emerging Designers Awards 2016
Highlights of the 2016 iD Dunedin fashion week show. Featuring live performances from the ‘Dunedin Sound’ Musicians, zealander 2, Carter, Morley and Yeats….

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█ Criticism. Frankly, iD Fashion organisers, get over yourselves – let’s hope there’s better music for this year’s runway shows! The dismal so-called ‘Dunedin Sound’ was an abject failure, on and off made the audience grossly uncomfortable. Must’ve been bloody hard for the runway models – JFC, bad enough watching the videos!

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Education: Art and Design #UK

UK NSN report responds to the ongoing concern over the decline in the number of young people studying art and design, prompted by statements from numerous industry figures.

Brexit Effect | National Society for Education in Art and Design said art and design in schools was being eroded while the Creative Industries Federation described the failure to educate a new generation of creatives as “economic suicide”.

Art and design can help drive up standards in schools, says UK government
Amy Frearson | 8 February 2017 ● Dezeen
The UK government is urging schools to promote art and design subjects, after a report found that schools with more creative pupils achieve significantly higher grades. Released today, the New Schools Network (NSN) Arts Report reveals that schools with more arts GSCEs per pupil achieve above-average results. This was proven to be the case for schools in deprived areas, as well as those in affluent neighbourhoods. It shows that offering a broad mix of subjects, in addition to those included in the controversial English Baccalaureate (EBacc) system – which favours more traditional subjects like science and history – leads to better performance. At a launch event for the report earlier today, digital and culture minister Matt Hancock said the government is doing all it can to support creative subjects, but it is up to schools to deliver a varied curriculum. “This should not be an argument about a battle between the arts and other subjects, but instead a battle for stronger, better, well-rounded education,” he said. “Ultimately, the best schools in the country do this. They combine excellent cultural education to complement excellence in other academic subjects,” Hancock continued. “This report backs up that analysis. It looks at the data and says, if you want to drive up standards across the board, push your arts and music offer.”
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Note: The English Baccalaureate (EBacc) is a performance measure for schools, awarded when students secure a grade C or above at GCSE level across a core of five academic subjects – english, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language.

Corned beef at NZ….

installation-view-of-povi-christkeke-by-michel-tuffery-1999-christchurchartgallery-org-nz-1Installation view of Povi Christkeke by Michel Tuffery 1999
Education | Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu [christchurchartgallery.org.nz]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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ODT feature : Streets of gold #Dunedin

In case you missed the ODT four-part series on Dunedin’s residential heritage in late December….. here it is, via Dave Cannan’s The Wash (Facebook).




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█ The four parts, abridged for quick reference and linked here below, had an excellent (research) information follow-up by Kim Dungey.

Some very approximate dates have been added care of Quality Value (QV), these are based on (limited) property records held by councils; as well as year dates for historical architects, where known.

Streets of Gold, a Summer Times series celebrating Dunedin’s rich architectural heritage. In collaboration with Heritage New Zealand researchers Heather Bauchop and Susan Irvine, with additional research by David Murray, archivist, Hocken Collections; and Alison Breese, archivist, Dunedin City Council.

### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: High St
High Street has an association with the medical profession dating back to the 1880s, when the Mornington cable car started running and some impressive new houses were built along its route.

CAVENDISH CHAMBERS, 211 High St.
The company behind the venture, Medical Buildings Ltd, was incorporated on March 1, 1926, and the shareholders all took professional rooms in the new property. The building was completed in 1927. Architect: Eric Miller (1896-1948).

236 HIGH ST
This prominent residence (QV: c.1900?) with a turret and projecting windows was designed in 1888 for Scottish-born Dr Frank Ogston. Ogston gained his medical degree in Aberdeen and emigrated to Dunedin in 1886 to take up a position as a lecturer in medical jurisprudence and hygiene at the University of Otago. Architect: Henry Hardy (1830-1908), and builder-developer.

238 HIGH ST
An Arts and Crafts-style design, the house (QV: c.1909?) is finished in roughcast with brick exposed on the ground floor sills. It was built for Dr D.E. Williams and his family as a private residence and doctor’s surgery and was home to the Williams family until the 1960s. Architect: Basil Hooper (1876-1960).

296 HIGH ST
Built in 1904, the Chalet Hospital (a private facility) was described as being “finished in coloured and tuck-pointed brickwork … the whole of the relief and ornament is carried out in bold cornices over the windows”. Architect: John Louis Salmond (1868-1950).

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: York Pl
York Place features two large homes once owned by members of the Speight family.

LARBERT VILLA – 371 York Pl
It is unclear exactly when the villa was built. Coppersmith Alexander Burt, of A and T Burt, married Janet Crawford in 1866 (they had a family of six sons and three daughters) and the couple were living in York Pl by July 1868 when Janet gave birth to a son at the house.

FORMER SPEIGHT RESIDENCE – 362 York Pl
Built for Jessie and Charles Speight after their marriage in 1898, the residence appears in the Dunedin City Council rates records in the 1899-1900 year. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

HAEATA – 273 York Pl
The residence of Charles and Jessie Speight from the time it was built in 1915, it remained in the Speight family until 1960. Bearing a strong resemblance to the Theomin family’s Olveston (built 1907, designed by Sir Ernest George). Architect: John Brown (1875-1923), a neighbour.

MRS TURNBULL’S GROCERY STORE – 324 York Pl
Known more than a century ago as Mrs Turnbull’s Grocery Store, this unusual wedge-shaped building began life as a home, stables and shop built for John and Janet Turnbull in 1875. In January 1875 tenders were invited for a two-storey dwelling and shop to be constructed of wood. Architect and Surveyor: E.J. Sanders [aka Saunders].

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Wed, 28 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Highgate
Highgate has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

RENFREW HOUSE – 111 Highgate
Thought to have originated as a single-storey bluestone house with a central front door and double hung windows on each side. A second storey was later added. The exterior walls were built of double stone – more than 70cm thick – and the interior walls of double brick. With its wrought iron lacework, it has been described as one of the “finest examples of classic Victorian architecture in Dunedin”. Home of businessman Andrew McFarlane (1842-1904) and his wife Jane Wilson (1847-1920). By the 1890s, the family referred to their home as “Renfrew House”. Architect: credited to Nathaniel Wales (1832-1903), a neighbour.
 
KAWARAU – 204 Highgate
Designed in 1900 for dredging tycoon Alexander McGeorge, this grand residence reflects the fortunes made in Otago’s gold dredging boom of the late 1890s and early 20th century. Trained at Dunedin firm Cossens and Black, McGeorge (1868-1953) held a variety of significant engineering posts. The two-storeyed house is built of brick, has a slate roof, ornate decorative detailing, and features Tudor influences in the half timbering and veranda details. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

FORMER HUXTABLE RESIDENCE – 233 Highgate
This 1907 brick and tile residence designed for Anna and Alexander Huxtable, is a beautifully detailed example of an Edwardian villa, one with historic and architectural significance. Anna Huxtable was granted the land in 1907; a survey on May 15, 1907, indicates the foundations for the new dwelling were already in place at that date. (QV: c.1910?). Alexander Murray Huxtable described himself as both a commercial agent and patent medicine manufacturer. Architect: Edward Walden (1870-1944).

MELROSE – 384 Highgate
Likely designed for lawyer Arthur Nation (1852-1927) around 1876. In October that year, tenders were called for the construction of a “brick cottage” in the suburb of Melrose (a private subdivision in what is now known as Roslyn). However, Nation appears to have built more than a cottage: when his property was offered for sale in 1879 it was described as “a substantially-built and well-finished brick house”, its original features including hand-painted ceilings, timber joinery and stained glass. Architect: credited to John McGregor (1838-1911), and harbour engineer.

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Thu, 29 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Royal Tce
Royal Terrace has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

DAISY BANK – 12 Royal Tce
Associated with the prominent Hudson family. An Italianate, two-storeyed symmetrical house with a large basement, “Daisy Bank” was built of concrete and wood, circa 1897. Architect: J.A. Burnside (1856-1920).

LINDEN – 22 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s, a two-storied, two-bay Victorian residence of more than 15 rooms, with an exterior comprising plastered triple brick with quoins, foundations of Leith Valley andesite and a slate roof. Associated with the prominent Isaacs and Hudson families. Architect: Mason and Wales (likely Nathaniel Wales).

CLAVERTON – 30 Royal Tce
Associated with prominent local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary and one of New Zealand’s most prominent artistic families, the Hodgkins. Claverton was most likely built in 1877 by local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary (1840-95). Architect: likely Maxwell Bury (1825-1912).

ALYTH – 34 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s by prominent businessman, community leader and one-time Dunedin mayor Keith Ramsay (1844-1906). Named Alyth after Ramsay’s birth place, the house was completed, at the latest, by March 1875. Architect: Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902).

Read more + Photos

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It doesn’t have to be a mansion located on the high streets….

crabapple-cottage-otago-peninsula-thecuriouskiwi-co-nzCrabapple Cottage, Otago Peninsula [thecuriouskiwi.co.nz]

Lastly, a THOROUGHLY USEFUL guide for those unfamiliar with historic heritage archives, technical sources and search methods.

### ODT Online Fri, 30 Dec 2016
What is your house hiding?
By Kim Dungey
Enjoyed this week’s Streets of Gold series, in which we have profiled various Dunedin houses of historic significance? Fancy playing detective and tracing the history of your home? … In recent years, Heritage New Zealand has run “how to research your home” workshops in Dunedin, Invercargill, Oamaru and Central Otago. The popular seminars have drawn together the sources it uses every day to tell the story of historic places. Archivists say some people want to restore their homes to their original states, are curious about former owners or simply want to know the age of their houses for insurance purposes. Others require archaeological assessments of pre-1901 properties or have reported seeing ghosts in their homes and wanted to work out who they might be. Interested homeowners have a wealth of resources at their fingertips….
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Win! to DCC candidate Paul Pope #DunedinHospital

ODT 22.8.16 (page 6)

ODT 22.8.16 Letters to editor Pope p6 overlay*overlay by whatifdunedin

Posted by Stop Dunedin Hospital from being downgraded
Monday, 22 August 2016

[screenshot]

Facebook - Stop Dunedin Hospital from being downgraded 22.8.16

Comments on Monday, 22 August 2016 at 7:12 p.m.
[screenshot – click to enlarge]

Facebook - Stop Dunedin Hospital from being downgraded [Mon, 22 Aug 2016] - comments at 7.12 pm

█ For more, enter the terms *hospital*, *sdhb* and *food* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

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Misero-mercenary at U of O

misero mercenary

Just in, Rhodes says:

Naylor Love stiffed by U of O.
$100M Dental School to be awarded to Leighs Construction.

But…
Naylor Love’s consolation prize is the new $18M Otago Polytechnic Hall of Residence, where they were significantly more expensive than other local rival Amalgamated Builders, but scored much higher on non-price attributes, which gave them top ranking.

Amalgamated Builders, clearly not flavour of the month at either Polytech or University —it’s understood the same thing occurred at the recent Commerce Building Upgrade.

Related Post and Comments:
1.7.16 No one wants to work for U of O
31.5.13 University of Otago development plans

For more enter the term *university*, *campus master plan*, *property services*, *leith flood protection* or *landscaping* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

12 Comments

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