Tag Archives: University of Otago

SH1 Cycleways : the real story

Received from Hilary Calvert
Wed, 22 Feb 2017 12:40 p.m.

[begins]

NZTA has produced a Q and A sheet for their project news update on our cycle lanes along the one-way streets.

An annotated version is provided for reality junkies:

Q: Why is there a need for separated cycleways on the one-way system?

NZTA: Cyclists and pedestrians are over represented in fatal and serious injury crashes. There have been 2 fatalities since 2011. Short-term safety measure were put into place in 2013. Separated cycle lanes are the long-term solution.

Reality: There have been no deaths since the cycle lanes were widened in 2013. The two deaths since 2011 were likely contributed to by the very act of creating cycle lanes in the blind spot of vehicles. Had these cyclists been on the road they would have been safer.

Q: Where else in the country are they using these?

NZTA: These lanes are becoming familiar in major cities including Christchurch. Busy urban routes such as the one-way streets in Dunedin need higher standards of cycle lanes.

Reality: No one in their right mind would direct cyclists to State Highway 1, where all the trucks go. If these two parallel roads were returned to two-way streets, you might put trucks on one and bikes on the other. But this is mad.

Q: Why put the cycleways on the right rather than the left?

NZTA: Because it increases cycle safety and separates them from bus stops.

Reality: Bingo! NZTA has finally realised delivering cyclists to the blind side of trucks is very dangerous. But it was NZTA who chose to do that last time. A simple sorry would be a start.

Q: why not on the right-hand side from Duke St to Otago Museum then?

NZTA: This has been done in response to feedback received and supported by further cycle surveys. And there is a large number of cyclists who use this route who would have to cross the road.

Reality: Really? So feedback overcomes safety? Surely this brings into question whether they really understand the safety issues with the left-hand side. WE all know that cyclists are no different from the rest of us, they will take their bikes on the shortest route they can find. Which will mean that they are spending most of their time not on the new cycle lane. Actually, most of their time will be spent walking around campus because the University won’t let cyclists inside – safety issues, apparently.

Q: What impact will this have on parking?

NZTA: Keeping the cycle lanes on the unsafe side of the road will mean we lose 20 fewer parks. Parking will be provided in high demand areas. (see revised plans).

Reality: We will lose hundreds of parks, particularly in the highest parking areas around the hospital (made worse by the DCC proposal to build on the car parking area at Frederick St). Parking is already squeezed in high demand areas. These guys are in la la land, and I don’t mean the award winning movie.

Q: Will these cycle lanes disrupt traffic flows?

NZTA: The lanes are likely to smooth traffic flows and provide more reliable travel times because there will be fewer parking movements.

Reality: Yes more reliably longer times, which are likely to double for anyone using the one-way streets. More phases for cyclists and pedestrians, more traffic trying to find parks, more time needed to get to hospital appointments. It wasn’t that broke. Why are those from out of town so determined to get in the way of traffic in Dunedin?

Q: How many cyclists are likely to use the cycle lanes?

NZTA: Current usage peaks at 500 per day, but this could easily double. We will measure the change.

Reality: Weasel words. Try looking north from Lower Stuart St along the one-way street. There will be several vehicles on the cycle lanes and likely not even 1 cyclist. The reality is that we are likely to have fewer than 1 cyclist per kilometre of cycleway in Dunedin at any one time. The maximum of 500 is not relevant to the usage in general. (And indeed 500 per day is 500 over 1440 minutes, about one every 3 minutes. At the absolute peak. For a moment in time. So it may double to 1 cyclist at the absolute maximum every 1.5 minutes.) And having measured it later, we are still stuck with the cycle lanes even if they don’t create double the usage. Meanwhile there is no proposed monitoring of the time wasted on getting to hospital appointments, or the time spent by students walking further from free car parking to lectures, or any other flow-on effects of decreased parking where it is currently available.

Q: When is work likely to start?

NZTA: May 2017, taking around 15 months and in such a way as to ensure the one-way system is able to operate effectively and any disruption is kept to a minimum.

Reality: These streets are groaning at the seams already. Our entire one-way system will become impossible to operate usefully, and it will take double the time. By this time those who came to Dunedin because the traffic wasn’t so bad will have the start of every working day diminished and their Dunedin experience effectively destroyed around the central city. We have an elderly population, and this will be the last three years of the lives of some of us.

Q: Who pays and what will it cost?

NZTA: NZTA will pay for the work directly related to the cycle lanes. $8million.

Reality: More weasel words. There are large costs not included in the direct costs. Agencies are keen on doing guestimates of the multiplier effect of benefits to the city for, say, acts at the stadium. What about a study of the likely costs to the city of loss of parking revenue, loss of time spent driving around, loss of time spent walking from vehicles, anxiety around hospital appointments, loss of business for those relying on easy car access for their custom etc. There are also costs for the work connecting roads and footpaths etc between the cycleways and the rest of our DCC infrastructure, and the inevitable landscaping in the vicinity. And then the costs of fixing what we had to redo because none of the agencies are working together. An expensive nightmare.

Q: What is being done to provide more integrated transport in Dunedin?

NZTA: NZTA, DCC and ORC are implementing transport related projects: this is one. These cycle lanes will connect with cycling lanes being considered in North Dunedin linking University, Hospital, Otago Polytechnic and the CBD.

Reality: These institutions are already handy to each other. As regards the University the biggest obstacle to cycling is the size of the campus which cannot be crossed by cyclists.

****

Pity NZTA doesn’t have a booth in the heart of Dunedin where they could come and sit and listen to the issues. Perhaps on the corner of Stuart St and the one-way streets?

[ends]

NZTA Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme
Cycling in Dunedin contributes to improving transport options, providing a more efficient and integrated transport network, improving health, economic and social outcomes and city liveability. The Urban Cycleways Fund, subject to council approval, will help to accelerate the City to Harbour Bridge and the Central City and North East Valley cycle network.

NZTA Urban Cycleways Programme [general information]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

█ GREEN ATTACK ON YOUR BUILT ENVIRONMENT

leisure-cyclist-on-beach-road-cycleway-auckland-nzta-govt-nz-1two-way-separated-cycleway-beach-road-auckland-nzta-govt-nzTwo-way separated cycleway on Beach Road, Auckland [nzta.govt.nz]

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Filed under Business, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Health, Hot air, Infrastructure, Name, New Zealand, NZTA, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Sport, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

SDHB/Govt : Physio Pool GRIEF

Girl in water with dumbbels140 Hanover St [rankedbyreview.co.nz]

Pool upgrade supposed to happen a year ago this month.

### ODT Online Mon, 23 Jan 2017
Grant lost as physio pool work stalls
By Eileen Goodwin
A $120,000 grant has been pulled from the Dunedin physiotherapy pool upgrade because no-one yet knows when — or even if — it will happen. And the Otago Therapeutic Pool Trust has confirmed a second grant, of $100,000, is subject to an extension review and a decision is awaited.
Pool trust secretary-treasurer Neville Martin […] hopes to know more by June, when the Ministry of Health is expected to release a shortlist of site options for the $300 million Dunedin Hospital rebuild.
Read more

“To avoid closure of the pool by the Southern District Health Board, the trust has been required to cover all operating costs since the beginning of 2015.” –Neville Martin

Related Posts and Comments:
2.10.16 WHO says ‘heritage rules are too restrictive’ —What’s their agenda in the Heritage City
21.8.14 Dirty pool? #SDHB #University
6.8.14 Otago Therapeutic Pool at Dunedin Hospital

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCHL, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Health, Heritage, Infrastructure, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Politics, Pools, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, SDHB, Site, Sport, Travesty, University of Otago, What stadium

Stay positive Dunedin #awash

tqofe-stay-positive-dunedin-23-9-16-1TQoFE 23.9.16

****

Cull climbs into alcohol issue to advance his mayoral election campaign (?) – yet specifically states he won’t campaign on the matter of the new Dunedin hospital and retention of health services for Dunedin’s wellbeing.

Drink to that, Dave! *clink

### ODT Online Sat, 24 Sep 2016
Alcohol policy appealed
By Chris Morris
The Dunedin City Council faces a potentially protracted legal battle as New Zealand’s supermarket giants join forces to fight the city’s local alcohol policy. Progressive Enterprises and Foodstuffs are among eight parties — including the  New Zealand Police — to appeal the DCC’s provisional local alcohol policy. The appeals  mean the council’s policy  remains in limbo and changes to curb alcohol-related harm are stalled, more than a year after the initiatives were signed off by councillors.
Read more

Related Post and Comments:
29.4.16 Otago students at Pitt St: No longer drunk possums in trees
7.3.16 Balcony Collapse at Six60 concert, 598 Castle Street, Dunedin
3.11.15 Dunedin: University students into excess alcohol, party drugs… #CRIME
15.7.15 Business owner forcibly removed from Dunedin Central police station
● 11.5.15 Don’t for Chrissakes play down effects of liquor barons #DUD
● 8.5.15 Sunday TVNZ #Dunedin —10 May TV1 at 7:00 pm
● 11.11.14 Dunedin’s draft local alcohol policy (Lap)…
30.4.14 Octagon mud

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Events, Finance, Geography, Health, Heritage, Hotel, Housing, Media, People, Perversion, Politics, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

U o O please explain!

The University of Auckland was ranked in the top 151-200 universities, an improvement on 2015 when the institution was ranked in the top 201-300.

### ODT Online Thu, 25 Aug 2016
Otago drops in academic ranking
By Margot Taylor
The University of Otago has dropped in an annual list of the world’s top universities. The university was ranked in the 300-401 band of the top 500 universities in the world in Shanghai Ranking Consultancy’s Academic Ranking of World Universities 2016, the first time in eight years it has not been in the top 200-301. […] Otago University was the only New Zealand institution to drop in the list since it was last ranked.
Read more

University of Otago Capping Sextet, 2015 - John Key Tugs [youtube.com]University of Otago Capping Sextet, 2015 [youtube.com]

█ For more, enter the terms *u o o*, *university*, *harlene* or *student* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image:

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Filed under Business, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Heritage, Infrastructure, Media, Name, New Zealand, Public interest, Site, University of Otago, What stadium

Misero-mercenary at U of O

misero mercenary

Just in, Rhodes says:

Naylor Love stiffed by U of O.
$100M Dental School to be awarded to Leighs Construction.

But…
Naylor Love’s consolation prize is the new $18M Otago Polytechnic Hall of Residence, where they were significantly more expensive than other local rival Amalgamated Builders, but scored much higher on non-price attributes, which gave them top ranking.

Amalgamated Builders, clearly not flavour of the month at either Polytech or University —it’s understood the same thing occurred at the recent Commerce Building Upgrade.

Related Post and Comments:
1.7.16 No one wants to work for U of O
31.5.13 University of Otago development plans

For more enter the term *university*, *campus master plan*, *property services*, *leith flood protection* or *landscaping* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

12 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Infrastructure, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Otago students at Pitt St: No longer drunk possums in trees

Last night I heard (muted) sirens about, nothing more – not realising what was happening a few houses away up Pitt St. My place is tucked in off the road, nothing seemed out of the usual for a Thursday night, ‘student party night’ —just typical city noise that often includes sirens and choppers. Reading through a consent file for 97 Filleul St collected from DCC that afternoon, I was absorbed, completely missing the street action…. On waking this morning, I opened the first message on my phone, from a journalist asking if I’d heard the party on Pitt St last night? Hmm

Google Street View -18 Pitt Street, Dunedin Nov2009 (1)18 Pitt Street, Dunedin [Google Street View Nov 2009] tweaked

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 12:50, April 29 2016
Dunedin student seriously injured after jumping from roof
By Laura Walters and Hamish McNeilly
A Dunedin student in hospital with life-threatening injuries jumped from a roof just minutes after party-goers were told to turn their music down by noise control officers. Dunedin District Command Centre Senior Sergeant Brian Benn said police were called to the house on Pitt St about 11.30pm on Thursday. “A drunken student tried to jump off a roof. That didn’t end too well for him.” Benn said no one at the party saw the 21-year-old land after jumping from the roof, but when partygoers went to find out what happened they found him with “reasonably serious injuries”. Neighbours said the flat had been quiet during 2016 until Thursday night’s party. “It was a terrible racket,” one neighbour said. St John ambulance spokesman Andy Gray said the student’s condition was updated from serious to critical due to his “life threatening injuries”. He was taken to Dunedin Hospital but the large party continued.
Read more

Fri, 29 Apr 2016
ODT: Student ‘critical’ after jump off roof
A student is fighting for his life after jumping off the roof of a two-storey house at a large Dunedin flat party last night. Senior Sergeant Brian Benn, of Dunedin, said the 21-year-old was seriously injured after “an aerial stunt” at the Pitt St party went wrong.

Not for the first time.
Last year, it began with the male students at 53 Royal Tce….

Comment by Elizabeth
2016/04/07 at 2:38 am
An associate caught sight of a particularly juvenile and UNSAFE act that occurred next door [at 53]….
The scene.
Two storeyed house with dormer windows in the City Rise, tenanted by university 3rd or 4th year male students.
Constant noise and behavioural issues…. well-known to Noise Control, Campus Watch and Proctor [Police attention very much the next step – these young idiots have been told].

One of them had earlier broken his leg. Following recovery and some time later…. his so-called ‘friends’ egged him on to jump from a dormer roof (at second floor level) into a shallow paddling pool at ground level. He had to think about it for quite a while…. obviously he was facing serious injury or worse if he got it wrong, given the building height and shallowness of the water. Being a mental statistic he jumped – by luck not good management he did not need an ambulance.

What was that about safety nets – let the morons kill themselves, one less noise complaint.

red_cross_joshua_dwire_03.svg 2 - falling dude [creativebloq.com] whatifdunedin overlay

Recent student idiocy:
● 53 Royal Tce – Dunedin [no injury, not recorded] Late 2015
● 598 Castle St – Dunedin [multiple crowd injuries] 4 Mar 2016 Link
● 124 Dundas St – Dunedin [serious head injury] 12 Mar 2016 Link
● 18 Pitt St – Dunedin 2016 [critical injury] 28 Apr 2016

Related Post and Comments:
7.3.16 Balcony Collapse at Six60 concert, 598 Castle Street, Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: red_cross_joshua_dwire_03.svg 2 | creativebloq.com – falling dude
[whatifdunedin overlay]

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Filed under Baloney, Dunedin, Events, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Police, Property, Public interest, Site, Travesty, University of Otago

Professor Robert “Bob” Carter RIP

Robert Merlin “Bob” Carter (9 March 1942 – 19 January 2016) was an English palaeontologist, stratigrapher and marine geologist who is perhaps best known as a prominent Australian climate change skeptic. He was professor and head of the School of Earth Sciences at James Cook University from 1981 to 1998.

Gurglars emailed me on Sunday about the Obituary:

ODT 5.3.16 (page 32)

ODT 5.3.16 Obituary Robert Carter p32[click to enlarge]

Then I heard from Mick (Douglas Field) on Monday:

You will have read the obituary (ODT Saturday) to Bob Carter who died in January this year. As you know he was a prominent sceptic re climate science and was more or less bannished from James Cook University in Queenslamd. You wll also know of his strong connection to the University of Otago.
Chris Monckton (The Viscount Monckton of Brenchley) has written a rather charming piece of music that he has called Bob Carter’s Peal. It was originally written for piano but it has been modified by the clever people at Edinburgh University (Chris lives in Edinburgh) who made a version with the sound of the bells of Ghent Cathedral.

Go to: http://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/02/27/ghent-cathedral-bells-ring-out-bob-carters-peal/ Article + Audio

[excerpt]
“Professor Robert Carter of James Cook University, who died in January 2016, has been immortalised in a clock-tune written by one of his friends in the manner of a Turmuhrglockenspielsonatine by the Baroque German composer Johann Sebastian Bach. This poignant but merry tune has been described as “the loveliest bell-tune ever written”. Traditionally, the Classical composers wrote clock-tunes to commemorate the weddings or funerals of their friends.

Professor Robert Carter, a geologist, became internationally famous in the last two decades of his life because he was one of the very few scientists who had the courage publicly to question some of the more extreme claims made by advocates of the apocalyptic theory of global warming. As the reported rate of global warming (even after much ever-upward adjustment of the linear-regression trends on all of the principal global-temperature datasets) continues to be very considerably below the rates that had been predicted, his polite but incisive questioning of what has become a substitute for true religion in the academic world will one day be seen to have been prescient.
Bob Carter was personally distressed by the extent to which the academic world had abandoned the scientific method in the rent-seeking pursuit of ever-larger grants from governments panicked or profiting by the climate scare. His university, which makes much money out of global warming by this questionable method, felt threatened by its leading professor’s heresy. Shoddily, the vice-chancellor, to his eternal shame and to that of his university, presided over the abandonment of all pretense at academic freedom: the university took various frankly malicious steps to Bob Carter’s detriment, the last of which was the withdrawal of his right as an emeritus professor to continue to use the library of the university that he had served so long and so well.
He was deeply distressed not so much by his university’s mistreatment of him in the closing years of his long and distinguished life as by its totalitarian rejection of the essential and formerly sacrosanct principle of academic freedom to dissent from profitable orthodoxy. Despite the university’s petty-minded and self-serving misconduct, he remained cheerfully and determinedly active to the last, attending the UN climate summit in Paris in December 2015.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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