Monthly Archives: May 2013

Sinkhole

Friday, 31 May 2013 4:34 p.m.

St Clair Esplanande 31.5.13 (1)St Clair esplanade, Dunedin [image supplied – click to view enlarged]

Related Posts and Comments:
26.5.13 [bad news] St Clair seawall #FAIL
28.11.11 St Clair seawall and beach access
31.3.11 St Clair esplanade, Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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University of Otago development plans

University of Otago Registry and Clocktower Building [physics.otago.ac.nz] 1University of Otago Stadium building [otago.ac.nz] 2When previously . . .

### ODT Online Thu, 30 May 2013
$358m vote of confidence
By Vaughan Elder
The figure the university has earmarked for construction, from last year until 2020, was revealed in the university’s priority development plan, obtained by the Otago Daily Times under the Official Information Act. The plan includes 22 projects, 20 of which are in Dunedin. The university declined to reveal the budgets for individual projects, citing commercial sensitivity, but put the total budget for the work at $357.8 million.

University chief operating officer John Patrick said the projects were included in the plan for a number of reasons, including to accommodate growth, to improve building layout and efficiency and health and safety.

Asked how the university could afford such a large amount of work, given what it had previously described as a “difficult” funding environment, Mr Patrick said: “The University of Otago has a fiscal strategy that is designed to provide funding for capital development.”
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30.5.13 ODT: University updates staff on quake work

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (top) physics.otago.ac.nz – University of Otago Registry and Clocktower; otago.ac.nz – Building at University Plaza

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Warm Dunedin: assistance to homeowners for installing insulation and clean heating

Warm Up New Zealand (energywise.govt.nz)

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Warm Dunedin Trial Extended

This item was published on 31 May 2013.

The popular Warm Dunedin pilot programme has been extended for up to three months.

The Warm Dunedin targeted rate programme helps increase household warmth, health and comfort by providing a rates advance to help with the upfront costs of installing insulation and/or clean heating.

Warm Dunedin works alongside the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) Warm Up New Zealand: Heat Smart programme, which offers Energywise funding for installing insulation. Other funding and assistance programmes are also available.

Dunedin City Council Energy Manager Neville Auton says applications open again on 1 June and are due to close on 31 August. If funding runs out before applications close, the programme will stop earlier.
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Full information on the programme is available at www.dunedin.govt.nz/warmdunedin or phone Customer Services on 477 4000.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: EECA [energywise.govt.nz]

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Carisbrook: Auditor-General #fails Dunedin residents and ratepayers

Dunedin residents Bev Butler and Russell Garbutt each sought an inquiry into the Carisbrook deals.

(see my comment and other comments received)

### ODT Online Tue, 28 May 2013
No Carisbrook inquiry, auditor says
By Chris Morris
The Dunedin City Council’s possible multimillion-dollar loss from the sale of Carisbrook does not warrant an investigation, the Office of the Auditor-general says.

”We do not regard the purchase and disposal as raising issues that relate to our Delta inquiry, which is focused on the property investment actions of a council subsidiary.”

OAG staff have confirmed that there will be no investigation of the council’s purchase, and pending sale, of Carisbrook properties, which could end up costing the council more than $4 million. That followed two separate requests received by the office in February, asking for the Carisbrook deal to be added to a wider OAG investigation of land purchases by council-owned company Delta. An OAG statement yesterday said the decision not to proceed came after reviewing council documents, which showed the issue ”does not warrant further inquiry”.
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Related Post and Comments:
15.2.13 Carisbrook: Call for OAG investigation into DCC / ORFU deals

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Carisbrook and Leith flood protection

Received from Rob Hamlin.
Monday, 27 May 2013 1:03 p.m.

Carisbrook on Sunday (26.5.13)

Carisbrook 26.5.13. Rob Hamlin 1
A picture of doomed dereliction – Innit? I tried to take photos of this last week, but the weather wasn’t good enough. I seem to recall that the comb lines in the manicured grass were going in a different direction then, indicating that further ratepayer-funded pampering has occurred this last week. What earthly reason can there be for the DCC to be spending money doing this on a structure that they claim they have a) sold and b) issued a demo permit for? Some seats are missing (but could be inside). The lights are gone, but Delta bought the last set anyway so why not ‘play it again Sam’?

Otago Regional Council – Leith Flood Protection Scheme

Water of Leith 001 (1)001 ‘Sad Sacking’
The results of the equally seawall-like doomed attempts by the ORC and their representatives to establish a million dollar[?] lawn in the middle of winter in the bottom of a drainage channel occupied by a major flood prone waterway (the Leith). An act of simply heroic lunacy. This is the aftermath of the minor flood last week. The proto-lawn is covered in sacking further up the river, except for the bit next to the water – that’s now wrapped around the post in the foreground. Luckily it did not end up in the harbour – although many tons of silt presumably did. No doubt the ORC will be able to issue itself with a retrospective resource consent for this uncontrolled discharge into the environment.

Water of Leith 002 (1)Water of Leith 004 (1)002, 004 ‘Washed away’
For weeks now and presumably at great expense to the ORC, the contractors (Lund if the site signs are to be believed) have been laying down what looks like micropore mat, hexagon reinforcement, and what looks like a very expensive chicken wire plastic mesh combo – stitched together. They then planted grass on it. This can be seen growing feebly on the slope in 002. Alas, the minor flood that dislodged the sacking also gently sluiced out the soil and grass from the expensively-laid reinforcements on the level parts of the lawn laid (lunacy) right up to the edge of the river.

Water of Leith. Robert Hamlin (1)000 gives a higher angle shot showing the artistry of this now exposed and empty (of soil) soil stabilisation system, along with the feeble grass above it. I am not sure how they will reposition the soil into this stuff short of ripping it up and starting again. Presumably if all this expensive stuff was intended to stop soil coming out, it will be equally good at resisting attempts to put it back in again by mechanical means. Oh dear!

Water of Leith 003 (1)003 ‘Mighty defences’
Here we have what is actually supposed to keep the Leith in the straight and narrow from now on. This is the concrete shuttering for an incomplete part of the bank (this shuttering is now filled with shyte from the flood). The wall when poured (one hopes after clearing out said shyte) will be a worthy successor to the St Clair seawall – it is about 12 inches tall and 8 inches thick. It is plastered onto the top of (rather than onto the front of as with the seawall) the remains of its more substantial predecessor. The lawn (in the areas where it used to be there) starts directly behind it…

Water of Leith 005 (1)005 ‘Classy concrete placing’
The mighty foot-high defences take an interesting course in the photograph taken looking up the left-hand bank from the Forth Street Bridge. I do not know if this feature-bulge in the mighty wall is the outcome of a molar-like architectural design feature to increase the organic appearance of the site or if it’s simply a concrete shuttering quality control issue. It’s your rates money – you decide.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Photos: Rob Hamlin (May 2013)

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[bad news] St Clair seawall #FAIL

Comment received from Stu.
2013/05/26 at 7:29 pm

St Clair sea wall compromised? Webcam image refreshes every 1 minute.

http://media.wickednetworks.co.nz/current-stclair.jpg

Tweet to @whatifdunedin from @lowercasewriter.

Tweet @lowercasewriter 26.5.13

StClair

Related Post and Comments:
28.11.11 St Clair seawall and beach access

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

140 Comments

Filed under Construction, DCC, Design, IPENZ, Project management, Property, Site, Urban design

[good news] McKinlays shoes

McKinlays desert boot. Dunedin (stuff.co.nz 26.5.13)

Dunedin desert boots, made under the fashion radar

The first McKinlays factory was set up in Dunedin in 1879; the patriarch, William Robert, came from Kilmarnock in Scotland. McKinlays kept it going until the Depression of the 1930s, when the business, along with so many others, went bankrupt. They started up again in 1939, and now they’ve outlasted almost every New Zealand shoe factory that was going back then.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 26/05/2013
Based on a shoe story
By Rosemary McLeod – Sunday Star-Times
I bought the first pair – black – a couple of years ago, and went back straight away for the mauve ones. How comfortable. How cheap. How clever I was to make this discovery. This year I bought the deep yellow pair, but what I’d really like is all the colours, lined up neatly in my wardrobe. […] McKinlays have been making them steadily for years, and they’ll probably be making them for many more years yet, just under the fashion radar. This year there’s purple, as opposed to my mauve, for example. There used to be a bolder green. The wonder of it is, they’re made in Dunedin. The only other hands-on shoemakers left in this country since deregulation are Last Rite (workboots), Minnie Cooper (trendy, cute ads), Sole Shoes (cheap) and Paraflex (industrial work boots).

All McKinlays shoes are made from cowhide. They’re turned out on old-style factory equipment which is now irreplaceable; the new equivalents, Italian-made, inevitably, are only good for huge production runs for huge markets. That’s no good for a business that, beside its usual production runs, makes shoes for people with problem feet, one pair at a time – as well as shoes for hobbits, on request.

It’s not a big factory; nor is it flash, but McKinlays turns out 40-50,000 pairs of shoes a year here, Graham McKinlay tells me, some of them green blokey boots for the Australian defense force. The biggest sellers are a jodhpur boot called Hunter. They’ve been making 3000 pairs of those every year for the past 25 years.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Photo: stuff.co.nz
This story makes me smile. From my apartment I can see McKinlays shoe store on George Street, through the trees of Knox Garden.

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