Tag Archives: Franchises

Rugby stadiums not filling #SkyTV

Eden Park [stuff.co.nz]Waitakere Stadium may replace Eden Park

“Still the historical home of Auckland rugby and provided we get cost-effective venue hire, we can make it work.” –Andy Dalton, Auckland Rugby

### nzherald.co.nz 5:00 AM Tuesday Jul 15, 2014
Auckland rugby looks at new home
By Campbell Burnes
The Auckland Rugby Union is looking at the possibility of shifting their ITM Cup home games away from Eden Park as paltry crowds hit them financially. Auckland Rugby has been an official tenant of Eden Park since 1925 and historically has always been associated with the ground and sporting success there. While nothing has been formally tabled, and all five home ITM games this year will take place at Eden Park, the Herald understands there is a growing feeling that a venue such as Waitakere’s Trusts Stadium would be more suitable from 2015 or 2016.
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FB Stadium [newstalkzb.co.nz]Stadium/Rugby propped by Dunedin ratepayer subsidy (direct and hidden)

“When you look back at this time last year when we were all crying into our soup…” –Roger Clark, Highlanders

### ODT Online Tue, 15 Jul 2014
Rugby: Real money to be made from hosting games
By Steve Hepburn
The Highlanders were due to arrive in Durban early this morning and begin preparing for their playoff match against the Sharks on Sunday morning. The side ended up sixth in the table after the final round of games in the weekend and will be on the road the entire time it is in the playoffs. Highlanders general manager Roger Clark said the franchise would make a little bit of money out of making the playoffs but the real benefits came to those that hosted the games. He was yet to finalise how much money the team would receive for making the playoffs but it was not significant, he said.
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█ See comments to this article at ODT Online by russandbev, QsRC, MikeStk and others.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: stuff.co.nz – Eden Park; newstalkzb.co.nz Forsyth Barr Stadium

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Dunedin product innovation and production #doubleglazing

### ODT Online Mon, 7 Jul 2014
Retrofit double-glazing system catches on
By Sally Rae
A Dunedin-designed double-glazing system, which started as a concept drawn on a paper pie packet, is now being sold in Australia. Thermawood, a patented retrofit double-glazing system for existing timber joinery, was the brainchild of Graeme Clarke, whose background was both as a joiner and a glazier. The system was developed around drainage.
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Website: Thermawood Otago

Thermawood graphicFrom the website: ‘An advanced double glazing system for existing timber joinery. A unique, patented double glazing system which has been approved and tested to building standard NZS4211:2008 the industry standard for weather-tightness for windows and doors. Experienced, skilled tradesmen ensure quality workmanship. Thermawood is proudly locally owned and operated from Dunedin, servicing the wider Otago region. All Thermawood materials are 100% NZ made and the Grandadapter is manufactured locally in Mosgiel. Thermawood Otago are also experienced in and offer – retrofitting aluminium windows and doors, double glazing, re-glazing, frameless glass showers, balustrades, painted glass splash-backs, mirrors, architectural glazing systems.’

Note: What if? Dunedin can’t endorse the product; we can confirm it’s a locally available building option.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: thermawoodotago.co.nz

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Highlanders “Buy Us” entertainment: Obnoxious, noxious PROFESSIONAL RUGBY —stay away DCC !!!

One other possible investor could be Dunedin Venues Management Ltd as a shareholding in the Highlanders would keep the side playing at Forsyth Barr Stadium for the foreseeable future. –Steve Hepburn

### ODT Online Wed, 11 Dec 2013
Rugby: ORFU keen to be stakeholder in privatised Highlanders
By Steve Hepburn
The NZRU said yesterday the Highlanders were being considered for privatisation next year. The Otago Rugby Football Union is keen to be a stakeholder in the southern franchise, but whether the union has the financial muscle to get involved is still open to question although any discussion is months away.
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DVML is drowning in debt and is on shaky management ground (there is more to say about that in coming days).

ORFU is the entity DCC has continually ‘helped’ to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars over a considerable number of years without qualification, openly, illicitly — without the required checks and balances in place to conservatively and prudently manage ratepayer funds — DCC has been the unsanctionable open chequebook of assistance to a fraudulent sporting regime.

No doubt Mr Mayor Rugby-is-Us Cull (with ex Cr Brown and the like pulling strings), the DVML Boys, and the money-laundering GOBs of Dunedin… will want to buy a rugby team. Because the GOBs/ORFU sure as hell did not buy the stadium – they connived and deceived to have it gifted by all ratepayers and residents such that the city council’s consolidated debt is $623 million and rising. They haven’t raised the (conditional) $45 million in private sector funding they promised to the stadium construction project. And now, they want MORE.

Disgusting.

█ ODT 11.12.13 A levelled playing field – the end of Carisbrook

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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This is all painfully familiar…

blog.svconline.com

The trials of the Phoenix Coyotes, the least popular hockey team in the NHL, offer a lesson in public debt and defeat.

### theatlantic.com Sep 7 2012, 2:37 PM ET
Business
If You Build It, They Might Not Come: The Risky Economics of Sports Stadiums
By Pat Garofalo and Travis Waldron
In June, the city council of Glendale, Arizona, decided to spend $324 million on the Phoenix Coyotes, an ice hockey team that plays in Glendale’s Jobing.com Arena. The team has been owned by the league itself since its former owner, Jerry Moyes, declared bankruptcy in 2009. For each of the past two seasons, Glendale has paid $25 million to the league to manage the Coyotes, even as the city faced millions of dollars in budget deficits. Now, Greg Jamison, who is also part of the organization that owns the NHL’s San Jose Sharks, is making a bid for the team, and would therefore be the beneficiary of the subsidies.

“Take whatever number the sports promoter says and move the decimal one place to the left. Divide it by ten. That’s a pretty good estimate of the actual economic impact.”

To put the deal in perspective, Glendale’s budget gap for 2012 is about $35 million. As the city voted to give a future Coyotes owner hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars, it laid off 49 public workers, and even considered putting its city hall and police station up as collateral to obtain a loan, according to the Arizona Republic. (The latter plan was ultimately scrapped.) Overall, Glendale is not only on the hook for $15 million per year over two decades to a potential Coyotes owner, but also a $12 million annual debt payment for construction of its arena. In return, according to the Republic, the city receives a measly “$2.2 million in annual rent payments, ticket surcharges, sales taxes and other fees.” Even if the Coyotes were to dominate the league like no other in recent memory and return to the Stanley Cup Finals year after year, the city would still lose $9 million annually.

“It’s kind of a perverse argument that taxpayers should subsidize this because businesses depend on this deal that isn’t viable.”

This is an altogether too common problem in professional sports. Across the country, franchises are able to extract taxpayer funding to build and maintain private facilities, promising huge returns for the public in the form of economic development.
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[Link supplied]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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