Tag Archives: Vision???

Norman Foster: SkyCycling utopia above London railways #ThinkBig

Or how to put DCC and NZTA to shame for their dangerous, low-design segregated cycle lane solution at Dunners. See the latest DCC / NZTA report, Summary of Cycle Safety Options Made Public, at Comments.

Foster SkyCycling utopia above London railways [dezeen.com]Foster SkyCycle [click to enlarge]

So Big Norm’s a cyclist, and when he gets a wee bit of work in New York City from time to time he likes to travel The High Line [Wikipedia]. But then. He had a gazumping thought about London congestion.

Foster is the only architect on Britain’s rich list.

### dezeen.com 2 January 2014
Norman Foster promotes “cycling utopia” above London’s railways
News: British architect Norman Foster has unveiled a concept to build a network of elevated pathways above London’s railways to create safe car-free cycling routes, following 14 cyclist deaths on the city’s streets in 2013.
Entitled SkyCycle, the proposal by architects Foster + Partners, landscape architects Exterior Architecture and transport consultant Space Syntax is for a “cycling utopia” of approximately 220 kilometres of dedicated cycle lanes, following the routes of existing train lines.
Over 200 entrance points would be dotted across the UK capital to provide access to ten different cycle paths. Each route would accommodate up to 12,000 cyclists per hour and could improve journey times across the city by up to half an hour.
“SkyCycle is a lateral approach to finding space in a congested city,” said Foster, who is both a regular cyclist and the president of Britain’s National Byway Trust. “By using the corridors above the suburban railways, we could create a world-class network of safe, car free cycle routes that are ideally located for commuters.”
If approved, the routes could be in place within 20 years, offering relief to a transport network that is already at capacity and will need to contend with 12 percent population growth over the next decade.
“To improve the quality of life for all in London and to encourage a new generation of cyclists, we have to make it safe. However, the greatest barrier to segregating cars and cyclists is the physical constraint of London’s streets, where space is already at a premium.”
According to the designers, construction of elevated decks would be considerably cheaper than building new roads and tunnels.
Read more

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### dezeen.com 28 November 2013
Sandwichbike flat-pack wooden bicycle by PedalFactory goes into production
A flat-pack wooden bicycle that can be assembled in less than an hour has gone into production. PedalFactory claims the Sandwichbike can be unpacked and put together in just 45 minutes. The single-speed bike is constructed from 19 parts that are packaged and delivered in a box along with the tools required to assemble it. The Sandwichbike was launched in Amsterdam on Sunday 1 December 2013. This innovative wooden bicycle is now being shipped.
Read more + images/slide show

Sandwichbike delivery box by Pedal Factory [dezeen.com]Sandwichbike by Pedal Factory [dezeen.com]“If you can make a sandwich, you can make a Sandwichbike.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images via dezeen.com

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Nostalgia (2001): Mr ‘DCC’ Harland’s blue sky lottery for plebs

Choices 2001-2021, the city’s strategic plan

Dunedin Your Way! (Choices 2001-2021) 1

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC ‘vision’ (spatial plan chess)

Read: Mayor and Councillors “trumped” by the contrivances of staff bureaucrats and their greedy developer friends. They call it public consultation. Or open chequebook.

Mayor Dave Cull described the plan as presenting the vision for the future city and the district plan as setting out the rules for development.

### ODT Online Tue, 18 Sep 2012
Spatial plan passes
By Debbie Porteous
A long-term vision for the development of Dunedin was adopted by the Dunedin City Council yesterday with a warning from councillors to developers. The Dunedin Towards 2050 – A Spatial Plan document provides the council with direction on managing future growth and development in Dunedin by specifying the nature and location of development in the city in years to come. It has no regulatory force, but carries some weight in resource consent and district plan change decisions and will guide the current review of the district plan, which is not expected to be operative until 2015.
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Cr Colin Weatherall is on the SERIOUS button, he knows there’s trouble ahead:

“During discussion on the plan Cr Colin Weatherall, the chairman of the council’s hearings committee, issued a note of caution about using the plan as a justification in resource consent applications, because the district plan still takes legal precedence.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Norman Foster, [A]rchitect

As the great British architect Norman Foster turns 75, he talks to Jonathan Glancey about flying cars, his new underground city – and how he beat bowel cancer.

### guardian.co.uk Tuesday 29 June 2010 21.31 BST
Norman Foster at 75: Norman’s conquests
By Jonathan Glancey
“The other day,” says Norman Foster, “I was counting the number of aircraft I’ve flown: from sailplanes and a Spitfire to a Cessna Citation. By chance, it comes to 75.” So Foster, who turned 75 this month, has decided to make models of all 75, to hang in his own personal museum, which he keeps at his Swiss home, an 18th-century chateau set in vineyards between Lausanne and Geneva.
These model aircraft will hover over his collection of some of the 20th-century’s greatest machines, cherished for both their engineering brilliance and streamlined beauty; many of them look like winged or wheeled versions of Foster’s most innovative buildings. “At the moment,” says the architect, “I’m restoring a Citroën Sahara, designed to tackle north African dunes. I’m also thinking of getting a Bell 47 helicopter as a focal point. And I’ve had a model made of the Graf Zeppelin airship.”
The subject [architecture] is too often treated as a fine art, delicately wrapped in mumbo-jumbo. In reality, it’s an all-embracing discipline taking in science, art, maths, engineering, climate, nature, politics, economics. Every time I’ve flown an aircraft, or visited a steelworks, or watched a panel-beater at work, I’ve learned something new that can be applied to buildings.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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