Tag Archives: Urban planning

DCC ‘vision’ (spatial plan chess)

Read: Mayor and Councillors “trumped” by the contrivances of staff bureaucrats and their greedy developer friends. They call it public consultation. Or open chequebook.

Mayor Dave Cull described the plan as presenting the vision for the future city and the district plan as setting out the rules for development.

### ODT Online Tue, 18 Sep 2012
Spatial plan passes
By Debbie Porteous
A long-term vision for the development of Dunedin was adopted by the Dunedin City Council yesterday with a warning from councillors to developers. The Dunedin Towards 2050 – A Spatial Plan document provides the council with direction on managing future growth and development in Dunedin by specifying the nature and location of development in the city in years to come. It has no regulatory force, but carries some weight in resource consent and district plan change decisions and will guide the current review of the district plan, which is not expected to be operative until 2015.
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Cr Colin Weatherall is on the SERIOUS button, he knows there’s trouble ahead:

“During discussion on the plan Cr Colin Weatherall, the chairman of the council’s hearings committee, issued a note of caution about using the plan as a justification in resource consent applications, because the district plan still takes legal precedence.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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interest.co heats NZ housing debate – listen up

This is not just about the Accommodation Supplement that 320,000 New Zealanders received last year. Alex Tarrant’s full post prompts a sharp, sometimes shonky blogging debate. It raises critical issues that dog the consultation and drafting of Dunedin’s spatial plan but which never got a look in, and never will. Read the comments.

Our ‘first’ spatial plan should not have been rushed, given the time scale it must address. For ‘rushed’ substitute ‘superheated’, where respect and consideration are much diminished for existing patterns of living (good and bad), underlying and surrounding issues, Southern practices and philosophies, utilisation of natural and people-made resources, regional and global influences, and cumulative effects – and the real economics of PLACE-SHAPING that hinge on the recent actions of a badly-managed, far-from-smart city council that has manufactured a mountain of unsustainable debt.

### interest.co.nz December 7, 2011 – 04:12pm
Property
Accommodation Supplement: Landlord subsidy punching a big hole in govt books due to unaffordable housing, or an essential benefit?
By Alex Tarrant
The government is being urged to boost the supply of affordable housing to help wean people off a state rent subsidy which could cost NZ$2.2 billion a year – almost twice as much as official predictions – by 2016. But any fix could require a large up-front investment in state house building, and/or require action from the private and community sectors to help increase housing supply, and therefore affordability, at the lower end of the price spectrum.

The Green Party has called on the government to see whether spending on the Accommodation Supplement could be more effectively spent elsewhere, with the party touting construction of more state houses as one solution to problems of housing and rent affordability. Co-leader Meteria Turei has attacked the Accommodation Supplement in Parliament as a subsidy for landlords. Turei told interest.co.nz high house prices, with constrained supply, meant higher rents and therefore costs to the government through the rent subsidy.

Meanwhile, the government’s Productivity Commission, which is currently investigating issues of housing affordability in New Zealand, has had the issue of the Accommodation Supplement, and the possible hit to the government’s books, raised with it by the Salvation Army.
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One (sample) blogger, right or wrong…

by PhilBest | 08 Dec 11, 11:08am (at Tarrant’s thread)

The fact, observable everywhere in the world where there are urban growth containment policies, is that the escalation of urban land prices under this racket, is always greater than the ability of people to “trade off” space to keep within what they can afford.

The few remaining undistorted markets in the world, have a LOWER median multiple house price AND a far larger average amount of space per person. A one-eighth of an acre section in NZ or Britain, costs literally several times as much as a 1 acre section in many US cities (regardless of pre-or-post-crash conditions. The US cities without urban land rackets had no price bubble).

The result of fringe homes being $150,000 houses on $250,000 sections instead of $150,000 houses on $50,000 sections; is that a decent apartment near the CBD is $1,000,000 (almost all of which represents gold-plated land value) instead of under $200,000 as it is in the undistorted market.

The biggest irony in all this, is that FAR LESS people have the “choice” of living near the CBD, under the “inflated land price” model. Economist Jan Brueckner says in a paper entitled “Urban Growth Boundaries: An Effective Second-Best Remedy For Unpriced Traffic Congestion?”:

“…failure of the Urban Growth Boundary to appreciably raise densities near employment centres is the main reason for its poor performance, and this failure will persist regardless of whether the city has one or many such centres…”

There are numerous other similar academic findings from economists listed HERE: http://www.performanceurbanplanning.org/academics.html

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Ian Athfield on post-earthquake Christchurch #eqnz

Ian Athfield chronicles the challenging journey taken since being appointed to the role of Architectural Ambassador for post-earthquake Christchurch.

The earthquakes have magnified the reliance on pattern making by the motorcar instead of dealing with the respecting of communities.

### architecturenow.co.nz 7 Dec 2011
The challenge of Christchurch
By Ian Athfield
For those who have been close to the destructive events which occurred in Christchurch it is extremely difficult to remove oneself from the magnitude of the task facing the city’s future. Thirteen months after the first quake, sitting watching the tide move slowly in over the sands of Awaroa in the Abel Tasman National Park, I am able to reflect on the subject without the confusion of the many voices and images that have been roused and drawn within Christchurch and beyond.
Proposals from Christchurch’s Draft Central City Plan

There is a very strong case to allow simple, low-rise, well designed, re-locatable buildings to link the remaining existing structures of the city in a clear and coherent expression of the beginning of a new focus, while long-term decisions are clearly thought through by intelligent minds working together. Long-term decisions can build on this fabric.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities

Dunedin City Council hosted a public lecture by Dr John Montgomery at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery last Friday (16 September).

Dr Montgomery provided a presentation [PDF, 5.94 MB] on the economy, culture and design of cities, building on his work in the UK and Australia. His views are particularly relevant for the development of Dunedin’s Central City Plan and Economic Development strategies.

John Montgomery is an urban planner, economist, author and managing director of Urban Cultures Ltd.

Urban Cultures consults in urban economics, city planning, urban design, arts-led urban revitalisation and managing the night-time city.

More on John Montgomery at Idealog.

Your City Our Future (YCOF) – Update

Dunedin City Council undertook a city-wide consultation in June 2011 to identify priorities for future expenditure. The results from the consultation survey are available here: YCOF survey report July 2011

The information and feedback received from the consultation, along with the feedback from the YCOF leadership teams has been used in the development of the Council’s draft spatial plan, “Dunedin Towards 2050”, draft Central City Plan, and draft Economic Development Strategy.

Formal consultation on these documents is planned for October/November 2011.

Find additional information on the development of the Council’s Central City Plan here: www.dunedin.govt.nz/centralcityplan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architecture and Design: harnessing the collaborative energy

### places.designobserver.com Posted 16.09.11
The Art of Advocacy: The Museum as Design Laboratory
By Barry Bergdoll
Since 2007, when I ventured out of the academy to take the reins of the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, we have traversed an unexpected set of economic, social and environmental challenges in which the centrality of the design professions has become manifestly clear, even as larger forces — in which designers are too often complicit — act to marginalise the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, design and the fine arts.

The neologism “starchitect” has lost much of its lustre…

Having worked side-by-side with diverse professionals, I am more than ever convinced that a cooperative, multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to the future vitality of the field — and essential if designers are to contribute to solving the enormous problems of our day. At MoMA we have been trying to discover meaningful positions and prospects even as practitioners have been jolted into discussion of just where the moral compass should be set.
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Richard Goldie on urban planning

### publicaddress.net 12:51 Dec 16, 2010
It’s called “planning” for a reason
By Richard Goldie, Peddle Thorp architects
My first blog. I’m told you just write as if you were talking — to be fair the absentee audience is a bit off-putting — heckling from a place of greater safety perhaps? And I’m not that fluid a typist. The good news is that the GFC* has afforded us all some headspace, so I’ve used a bit of the time to undertake more of what I call ‘thought projects’. Naturally a number of these are focused on Auckland. I’ll briefly introduce three of them now and hope the feedback will spur deeper thinking and then maybe the chance to speak to these in more depth. Here goes….urban planning!
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*Global Financial Crisis

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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