Tag Archives: Unreinforced Masonry (URM)

Enhancing building performance #eqnz

Knee-jerk reactions to government proposals are hardly necessary at Dunedin, the DCC’s earthquake-prone buildings policy has already been launched.

DCC Earthquake Strengthening + Policy

ODT 8.12.12:
Dunedin City Council [policy planner – heritage] Glen Hazelton said the Government’s proposals were “pretty much in line” with the council’s existing policy. That policy required owners whose buildings were found to be less than 34% of code requirements to upgrade. Owners had between 15 and 34 years to do so, depending on the state of their building, meaning some would face shorter timeframes under the Government’s proposals than they had expected, but not extra costs. The most earthquake damage-prone buildings had faced the shortest timeframes anyway under the council’s policy. The council had warned owners of the possibility timeframes would be reduced from 34 years.
The council’s own buildings – including the likes of the Town Hall, Municipal Chambers and Railway Station – were already having their earthquake strength tested, council city property manager Robert Clark said. That work began early this year and up to 30 written reports on individual buildings were expected by mid-next year. Some, such as the Municipal Chambers, had already been strengthened, while others, like the Railway Station, were considered to be of sturdy construction, but were being checked, he said. Results were yet to be made public, but buildings appeared to be “measuring up at the moment”, reaching 66% of the building code or even better, he said. The council already faced extra costs, having initiated its own checks, but it was “appropriate” to do so and ensure the health and safety of staff and the public. He expected the checks would meet the requirements of the Government proposals, although detailed information was yet to be received. Mr Clark doubted buildings would need to be abandoned or demolished.
http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/238351/quake-plans-could-see-buildings-adandoned

### NZ Herald Online 5:30 AM Saturday Dec 8, 2012
Earthquake changes could cost $1.7bn
By Isaac Davison
Uncompromising proposals to eliminate or strengthen earthquake-prone buildings could change the face of character areas such as Mt Eden’s Dominion Rd, and cause complex disputes in high-rise apartments owned by multiple parties. The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has proposed seismic assessment of all commercial and high-rise, multi-unit buildings in New Zealand – believed to be 193,000 properties.
Those that were not upgraded to withstand a moderate-sized earthquake within 10 years of assessment would be demolished.
The Government proposals were in response to a Canterbury Earthquake Royal Commission report on quake-prone buildings, released yesterday. The ministry broadly agreed with the Royal Commission’s recommendations, but it proposed more lenient timeframes for strengthening and did not agree that the minimum threshold for remedial work should be raised. Housing and Construction Minister Maurice Williamson said to do so would impose “catastrophic” costs on society.
The Government proposals have been released in a consultation paper. If they are adopted, the cost of the changes would be borne by councils and property owners.
Read more + Q&A

*****

Only 39 people died due to unreinforced masonry buildings at Christchurch, that’s remarkably few given the age and size of the city, the population size and concentration, and the extent of devastation caused by the quakes.

### NZ Herald Online 10:58 AM Friday Dec 7, 2012
Most NZ buildings to be quake assessed
By Isaac Davison
All non-residential buildings and high-rise, multi-unit apartments in New Zealand will be assessed for earthquake risk and the results made public under Government proposals released this morning.
Any building found to be at risk of collapse will have to be strengthened or demolished within 15 years under the proposed changes, which form the Government’s response to a Royal Commission investigation into earthquake-prone buildings after the Canterbury quakes.
The Government planned to adopt many of the commission’s recommendations, but has chosen longer timeframes and lower minimum standards of building strengthening than the report proposed.
The commission found there was poor information on earthquake-prone buildings in New Zealand, lack of central guidance on defining and repairing these structures, and variable council approaches to fixing the problem. Only 23 of 66 local authorities were able to tell the commission how many earthquake-prone buildings were in their area.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
19.7.12 Tonight – NZHPT Open Lecture WIN CLARK
2.7.12 Demolition by neglect. Townscape precincts.
26.1.12 Earthquake strengthening: voluntary targeted rates scheme
28.12.11 NZHPT National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund
15.12.11 Dunedin: Nominations for heritage re-use awards close next week
5.11.11 Barlow Justice Valuers / New Zealand Historic Places Trust—Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012
10.10.11 Facebook: Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage
9.10.11 Facebook: Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage
9.10.11 Diesoline – supreme winner of the inaugural Dunedin Heritage Re-use Awards
8.10.11 Workshop for heritage building owners – 23 November
3.10.11 Historic heritage SAVE
14.9.11 DCC Media Release: Dunedin’s Heritage Buildings
13.9.11 DCC assistance possible for earthquake strengthening
1.9.11 DCC Finance, Strategy and Development Committee
29.7.11 Disappearing heritage #Dunedin
4.5.11 Dunedin’s goldrush-era heritage won’t fall over, unless you make it
26.4.11 Dunedin Heritage Buildings Economic Re-use Steering Group
28.3.11 Dunedin earthquake proneness 2
10.3.11 Layers of Gold – Dunedin Heritage Festival 18-21 March 2011
21.2.11 Dunedin Heritage: Central government should be contributing
21.2.11 The proactive heritage development lobby EXISTS in Dunedin
19.2.11 Dunedin, are you ‘of a mind’ to protect Historic Heritage?
20.1.11 Dunedin Heritage Fund
16.1.11 DScene: Honour heritage
26.12.10 Historic heritage notes

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under #eqnz, Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Economics, Heritage, Media, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Tonight – NZHPT Open Lecture WIN CLARK

See earlier post with details and downloadable flyer.

CAN EARTHQUAKE PRONE BUILDINGS BE STRENGTHENED?

YES THEY CAN!

.

The future of ‘old buildings’ in Dunedin is a topical issue.
Come and hear Win Clark, consultant structural engineer and Executive Director for the NZ Society for Earthquake Engineering talk about how stone and masonry buildings can be strengthened.

Find out:
• Why do masonry buildings fail?
• What are the biggest issues for strengthening ‘old buildings’?
• What modern techniques are available to strengthen brick and stone masonry buildings?
• What are the solutions to meet structural and economic criteria?

Win Clark is the consultant structural engineer for NZ Historic Places Trust.

THURSDAY 19 JULY 2012 5:30 to 7pm
OTAGO MUSEUM – BARCLAY THEATRE
419 Great King Street, Dunedin

Light refreshments to follow the conclusion of the talk.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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NZHPT Open Lecture: WIN CLARK

All welcome. Free entry.

NZHPT Win Clark flyer (PDF, 606 KB)

Win Clark is consulting structural engineer for NZ Historic Places Trust.

Enquiries to Owen Graham, Area Manager – Otago/Southland
New Zealand Historic Places Trust/Pouhere Taonga

Floor 4, 109 Princes Street, PO Box 5467, Dunedin 9058, New Zealand
Phone 03 4779871 | DDI 03 4702362 | Cell 027 4316701 | Fax 03 4773893
Shop online at http://www.historic.org.nz/

Help keep New Zealand’s heritage places alive

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Prista Apartments: Dunedin’s goldrush-era heritage won’t fall over, unless you make it

Today, I was handed a B/W photocopy poster…

To find out more about early Dunedin and why people want to save these buildings, join the Gathering!

The buildings are located in the South Princes Street Townscape Precinct, and their facades to Princes Street are protected in the Dunedin City District Plan.

Nearby we have Jetty Street, so named because it was the main point of entry, by jetty, to colonial Dunedin’s commercial heart. The original harbour edge (before reclamation occurred) was in very close proximity to Princes Street.

These are not the first buildings erected in the street, they are the more solid ‘replacements’ financed on the proceeds of the Central Otago goldrush. They date to the 1860s-70s. They are a rare and unique remnant of a significant time in Dunedin’s commercial history and establishment.

The buildings are intact and, according to one of New Zealand’s leading structural engineers, Lou Robinson of Dunedin (a recognised specialist in earthquake strengthening), the facades are “simple” to strengthen and retain. The cost of retaining the facades is not prohibitive.

The same follows for the buildings themselves given their brick construction.

The Dunedin City Council “is of a mind” to grant the application to redevelop the site for apartments, with ground floor retail and first floor carparking – conditional to the applicant providing a new facade design that better meets the townscape precinct values.

Why would anyone take out authentic heritage fabric and replace it with what we hear could be mimicry of Victorian/Edwardian building details.

The Christchurch-based developer has been asked to submit a new facade design by 1 July 2010.

“Counting down” is a poor turn of phrase in the circumstances.

The organisers of the Save Historic Buildings Gathering welcome your participation this Saturday.

Those interested in earthquake strengthening, sustainable built environment, sustainable building approaches, embodied energy and lowering our carbon footprint can swap notes at the Gathering.

Keeping the buildings and adaptively re-using them, given their handy location in the CBD, is not just about aesthetics, cultural history and bygone eras, it’s also about preserving our heritage as a generator of economic development and attending to the quality and identity of ‘our place’.

[updated 18.6.13]

Related Posts and Comments:
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
15.9.10 Prista Apartments: Wrote this. Said this with a slight variation http://bit.ly/cTOrhv
13.9.10 Same again, Dunedin City District Plan about to be ignored
11.2.10 Note to DCC, via New Jersey
24.1.10 Prista Apartments: 372-392 Princes St and 11 Stafford St

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Project management, Urban design