Tag Archives: United Kingdom

Education: Art and Design #UK

UK NSN report responds to the ongoing concern over the decline in the number of young people studying art and design, prompted by statements from numerous industry figures.

Brexit Effect | National Society for Education in Art and Design said art and design in schools was being eroded while the Creative Industries Federation described the failure to educate a new generation of creatives as “economic suicide”.

Art and design can help drive up standards in schools, says UK government
Amy Frearson | 8 February 2017 ● Dezeen
The UK government is urging schools to promote art and design subjects, after a report found that schools with more creative pupils achieve significantly higher grades. Released today, the New Schools Network (NSN) Arts Report reveals that schools with more arts GSCEs per pupil achieve above-average results. This was proven to be the case for schools in deprived areas, as well as those in affluent neighbourhoods. It shows that offering a broad mix of subjects, in addition to those included in the controversial English Baccalaureate (EBacc) system – which favours more traditional subjects like science and history – leads to better performance. At a launch event for the report earlier today, digital and culture minister Matt Hancock said the government is doing all it can to support creative subjects, but it is up to schools to deliver a varied curriculum. “This should not be an argument about a battle between the arts and other subjects, but instead a battle for stronger, better, well-rounded education,” he said. “Ultimately, the best schools in the country do this. They combine excellent cultural education to complement excellence in other academic subjects,” Hancock continued. “This report backs up that analysis. It looks at the data and says, if you want to drive up standards across the board, push your arts and music offer.”
Read more

Note: The English Baccalaureate (EBacc) is a performance measure for schools, awarded when students secure a grade C or above at GCSE level across a core of five academic subjects – english, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language.

Corned beef at NZ….

installation-view-of-povi-christkeke-by-michel-tuffery-1999-christchurchartgallery-org-nz-1Installation view of Povi Christkeke by Michel Tuffery 1999
Education | Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu [christchurchartgallery.org.nz]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

3 Comments

Filed under Business, Design, Economics, Education, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, People, Public interest, Technology

Lexus UK latest design videos #cars #takumi

HAIL y’ballers on a budget bitches [greenie-cyclists @ #DUD]
Ain’t no down economy.

Lexus UK Published on Dec 21, 2015
Lexus on Ice: NX Ice Wheels
The Lexus hallmarks of expert design, sublime style, and supreme craftsmanship have driven their ethos of Creating Amazing for years, both in their production vehicles and their concepts. For Lexus’s latest project, they put a team master craftsmen to the test as they tackled their coolest concept yet: the ice-tyre Lexus NX. Driving on four perfectly-finished, hand-sculpted tyres made from optically perfect, crystal-clear ice, the Lexus NX emerged from its own test of craftsmanship and quality – a five-day deep freeze at -30 degrees Centigrade that left it clad in a thick layer of ice.

Taking three months from start to finish, the ice-tyre Lexus NX is the product of a collaboration between Lexus UK and the ice-sculpting experts at Hamilton Ice Sculptors. The challenge was two-fold: how to recreate the Lexus five-twin-spoke alloy wheel and its Yokohama winter tyre with incredible precision, while also making a wheel and tyre that would support the NX’s 2.2-tonne mass. Like the highly-trained Lexus ‘takumi’, Hamilton Ice Sculptors combine generations of experience using traditional ice-sculpting methods with the latest technology to design and produce their works of art. Employing advanced techniques like laser-scanning, three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD), and multi-axis machining equipment, they could produce consistent wheel and tyre combinations ready for hand-finishing with traditional tools and techniques.

With the ice tyres ready and the NX suitably chilled in its icy chamber, the moment of truth saw the wheels and ice tyres mounted onto the frozen Lexus hybrid (which started first time, of course) ready for its first attempt at driving on ice. Part engineering, part art, this unique project came together to prove that anything is possible with the right combination of desire, skill and dedication.

While tires made entirely from ice may not get the best traction, they certainly look cool. To start, the car’s actual wheels were laser-scanned to ensure the rolling ice sculptures were a perfect match for the vehicle. After the wheels were set in place, the NX sat in -22°F conditions for five days before it was finally unveiled. The ultimate test drive is far from the high speed, closed-course stunts you usually see in car commercials, but given that the NX has a curb weight of about 4000 pounds, the journey is plenty impressive on its own. (The glowing blue back lights are also a nice touch.) You can watch the full process in the video above. [msn motoring]

Lexus UK Published on Oct 5, 2015
Lexus – Making the Origami Inspired Car
There’s never been a Lexus quite like it: sheet metal, glass and plastics have been set aside for the creation of a one-off, life-sized recreation of the Lexus IS…. Crafted in precision-cut card. Pushing the boundaries of design, technology and craftsmanship, this driveable, full-sized sculpture explores Lexus’s promise of Creating Amazing. Comprised of some 1700 individually shaped pieces of cardboard, this origami-inspired car is a faithful replica of the Lexus IS saloon, and is produced as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills that go into every car Lexus makes. Many thanks to NVDK, a design and production agency, providing services for the industries of art, design and architecture, from concept right through to final production. NVDK specialises in digital craftsmanship, mixing cutting edge digital technologies with artisanal skills and traditions to achieve forward-looking results.

Learn more at: http://www.lexus.co.uk/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LexusUK/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/OfficialLexusUK
Instagram: https://instagram.com/officialLexusUK/

Website: http://www.nvdk.co.uk

Lexus UK Published on Apr 24, 2015
How to fold an origami cat with your non-dominant hand
The people that work at Lexus’ factories aren’t just employees. They’re craftsmen and women that take considerable pride in the standard of their work. But not all Lexus craftsmen are equal. At the top of the tree are artisans known as ‘takumi’. Their goal is simple – the pursuit of perfection in their chosen field, whether it be paintwork or welding, vehicle dynamics or interior crafting. They are responsible for keeping up the high standards Lexus demands of its vehicles. Becoming a takumi is no easy task. All takumi have at least a quarter of a century of experience, time spent honing their skills to a fine point. Several takumi have had their skills digitised and programmed into robots that recreate actions repeated thousands of times, so it’s vital that they’re up to scratch. Before becoming a takumi, candidates are assessed in a number of ways, but one is via a decidedly non-digital method – the Japanese art of paper folding, origami. Before they graduate to takumi status, candidates are challenged to fold a relatively simple origami cat. But here’s the catch – they have to fold the cat with just one hand, and in under 90 seconds. Oh, and it has to be their non-dominant hand. Challenging? To find out, we went to see Mark Bolitho. A respected name in the world of origami, Mark works full time creating paper masterworks for corporate clients, advertising and events, and is also the author of several books on the art. In short, he knows what he’s doing when it comes to folding paper.

Lexus UK Published on Oct 5, 2015
Lexus – The Origami Inspired Car Revealed

Lexus UK Published on Oct 8, 2015
Kevin McCloud drives Lexus Origami Car at Grand Designs Live 2015
Design guru Kevin McCloud launched the 10th anniversary of Grand Designs Live today by driving a unique, origami-inspired Lexus into the show at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham. The car is a life-size replica of the new Lexus IS saloon, created from 1,700 fully recyclable laser-cut cardboard sheets, capturing every design detail, inside and out. It has been commissioned by Lexus as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills of the takumi, the men and women who work on the company’s production lines in Japan.

Lexus UK Published on Jun 29, 2015
How to draw a car – designing the Lexus LF-SA
Lexus’ striking design has always been a fundamental part of its appeal – it’s what sets it apart from other premium marques. And there’s no better way of getting a deeper understanding of how Lexus is designing for the future than by watching the process from start to finish. This video goes behind the scenes at ED², Lexus top secret design studio in the south of France, to show you how to draw a car.

UK Lexus Published on Apr 21, 2015
Lexus at Milan Design Week 2015
A closer look at Lexus, A Journey of the Senses at Milan Design Week 2015.

Learn more at: http://www.lexus.co.uk/

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Coolness, Democracy, Design, Economics, Fun, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Leading edge, Media, Name, People, Project management, Transportation

Industrial Heritage Save: Cowes Hammerhead crane

Cowes Hammerhead Crane [cowes.co.uk] 2Cowes Hammerhead Crane 17.11.04 [iwradio.co.uk]Cowes Hammerhead crane at J S White Shipyard, Thetis Road

The 80 ton giant cantilever crane built of cast iron with a square tower of three stages with its base embedded in concrete was completed in 1911 by British firm Babcock and Wilcox.

via Twitter

Cowes Isle of Wight @cowesofficial Long over-due repairs to the iconic Cowes Hammerhead crane have been announced by the Isle of Wight Council. fb.me/1qTwdPn6v 24/12/14 12:38:54 a.m.

IOWCouncil Official @iwight Repair works to Cowes Hammerhead Crane to begin in March. Full details at iwight.com/news/Hammerhead-Crane-repair-works-to-begin pic.twitter.com/K57leaER1h 23/12/14 10:24:23 p.m.

TheVictorianSociety @thevicsoc Cowes Hammerhead crane named in Victorian Society’s Top Ten List of Most Endangered Buildings shar.es/1moLcS 9/10/14 4:12:22 a.m.

Cowes Hammerhead Crane 6938825525_abb3906851_z [staticflickr.com]

### onthewight.com Tuesday, 23 Dec 2014 9:35am
Isle of Wight News
Council make active moves to save important Island heritage
By Sally Perry
Repair works to secure the long-term future of the Cowes Hammerhead Crane are to begin in the new year after funding was received from English Heritage. Well done to all involved in moving this forward. The Cowes Hammerhead Crane is on English Heritage’s ‘at risk’ register and the organisation has put forward £76,000 to cover the costs of repairs to the famous structure. The council has appointed a specialist firm to carry out the works, which are due to begin in March 2015. The works will mainly see the corroded sections of steel from the crane’s tower replaced, with all new steel receiving a coat of paint. […] Clare Charlesworth, heritage at risk principal advisor for English Heritage, said: “Our grant towards the repair of the Hammerhead Crane means this nationally important piece of industrial heritage is one step closer to coming off the at risk register.”
Read more

****

Only remaining pre-WWI hammerhead crane
The giant cantilever crane was built within the first decade of these cranes’ development and is the only remaining pre-WWI hammerhead crane in England.

### onthewight.com Wednesday, 8 Oct 2014 8:07am
Isle of Wight News
Cowes Hammerhead crane named in Victorian Society’s Top Ten List of Most Endangered Buildings
By Joe O’Donnell
Last year the iconic giant cantilever crane in Cowes – used for the production of naval warships – was named Most at Risk by English Heritage, today it has been added to the Victorian Society’s Top Ten List of Most Endangered Buildings. […] Cowes’ industrial past is epitomised by shipbuilder J.S. White’s 80 ton hammerhead crane – installed to increase capacity for the production of naval warships. One of these, HMS Cavalier, is preserved at Chatham Dockyard as a memorial to the 143 British destroyers and over 11,000 men lost at sea during WWII. […] Earlier this year, Isle of Wight Council issued an urgent works notice to the crane’s owner after the crane was found to be structurally unsound. The owner is now disputing the urgent works notice but we urge the Council to continue to press to secure the future of this industrial landmark.
Read more

Cowes Hammerhead crane at J S White Shipyard [woottonbridgeiow.org.uk] 1Cowes Hammerhead crane (caption - cowes_floating_bridge_1950) [cowes.shalfleet.net][click to enlarge]

█ English Heritage List entry – No. 1390949 (history and description)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Cowes Hammerhead crane – (from top) cowes.co.uk | iwradio.co.uk | staticflickr.com [6938825525_abb3906851_z] | woottonbridgeiow.org.uk (mixed media to b/w by whatifdunedin) | cowes.shalfleet.net (1950)

6 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, Media, Name, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Urban design

Whaleoil on a favourite theme of ours

Whale Oil Beef Hooked logoA vigorous, voracious press would keep our country honest, unfortunately they are all as corrupt as Len Brown
by Cameron Slater on October 23, 2013
Our media have and continue to act in an utterly shameful manner. Now chasing off after some irrelevant titbit that some National MP said something. It is pathetic… our media like to claim they are the ones who hold the powerful to account, instead they are gutless, shameful apologists. They should be embarrassed. Len Brown is playing the victim now and his Albert Street branch of the mayoral office is running interference beautifully on his behalf. He has declared that there needs to be regulation of what people can say about politicians private lives…and there is not a squeak out of the media about that… instead they are running around looking for a conspiracy when the only conspiracy that exists is their conspiracy to talk about anything but Len Brown’s shenanigans. We need a powerful media, that as Boris Johnson says should be vigorous and voracious in order to keep the country honest… instead we have a bunch of gutless lapdogs doing the biding of ratbags, criminals and the corrupt.
Read more

@Whaleoil on Twitter | Whaleoil on Facebook

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Business, Democracy, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, What stadium

DUNEDIN: We’re short(!) but here is some UK nous…

Dunedin City has New Zealand’s largest historic heritage resource.

The following is taken from three pages of the English Heritage HELM Historic Environment Local Management website:

1. Tall Buildings
2. Regeneration
3. Building in Context

****

TALL BUILDINGS

Guidance on tall buildings update
The English Heritage and Design Council CABE 2007 joint Guidance on tall buildings is a material consideration in the determination of planning applications for tall buildings.

Guidance on tall buildings
Guidance on Tall Buildings sets out how English Heritage and Design Council CABE evaluate and consider proposals for tall buildings. It also offers advice on good practice in relation to tall buildings in the planning process. Both organisations recommend that local planning authorities use it to inform policy making and to evaluate planning applications for tall buildings where the appropriate policies are not yet in place and the Government has endorsed this guidance.

This revised version was endorsed by Government on 26 July 2007. The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (Mr. Iain Wright) said:
“In conjunction with my colleague the Minister for Culture, Creative Industries and Tourism, Department for Culture, Media and Sport, I would like to bring to the attention of the House the guidance note on tall buildings prepared jointly by English Heritage and the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), which is published today. This updates and supersedes previous guidance published in 2003 and reflects changes to the planning system since that time.

The Government’s aim is to ensure local planning authorities are getting the right developments in the right places, which we consider to be a fundamental part of creating places where people will want to live and work, now and in the future. Recent reforms to the planning system have helped to reinforce this message, making clear that all new development should be of good quality and designed in full appreciation of its surroundings and context. Tall buildings, in the right places and appropriately designed, can make positive contributions to our cities.

The Government therefore welcome this updated guidance, which will assist local planning authorities when evaluating planning applications for tall buildings, including, importantly, the need for effective engagement with local communities. It also places a greater emphasis on the contribution that design can make to improving the character and quality of an area. It offers good practice guidance to a range of stakeholders in relation to tall buildings in the planning process, provides practical advice on achieving well-designed solutions in the right places, and is capable of being material to the determination of planning applications. Copies of the documents are being placed in the Libraries of both Houses.”

The Guidance and the National Planning Policy Framework
The approach set out in the Guidance is consistent with the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). At the heart of the NPPF is the presumption in favour of “sustainable development”. Pursuing sustainable development involves seeking improvements to the quality of the built and historic environment (paragraph 9) as well as economic, social and environmental progress generally. Paragraph 17 identifies 12 core principles that should underpin both plan making and decision taking, including securing high quality design and a good standard of amenity for all existing and future occupants of land and buildings, taking account of the different roles and character of different areas; conserving heritage assets in a manner appropriate to their significance.

The Government attaches great importance to the design of the built environment. Permission should be refused for development of poor design that fails to take the opportunities available for improving the character and quality of an area and the way it functions (paragraphs 56 and 64). Planning decisions should ensure amongst other things that developments respond to local character and history (paragraph 58). Planning decisions should also address connections between people and places and the integration of new development into the historic environment (paragraph 61).

Local Planning Authorities should set out their strategic priorities for the area which should include strategic policies to deliver the conservation and enhancement of the natural and historic environment, including landscape (paragraph 156). Crucially, local plans should identify land where development would be inappropriate, for instance because of its environmental or historic significance. They need to contain a clear strategy for enhancing the natural, built and historic environment where they have been identified. – paragraph 157. This follows on from the requirement that local plans should set out the opportunities for development and clear policies on what will or will not be permitted and where (paragraph 154).

It is also important to note that local planning authorities should have up to date evidence about the historic environment in their area and use it to assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment (paragraph 169).
Link

Download
Guidance on tall buildings 2007 (71 KB)

****

REGENERATION

The historic environment is the context within which new development happens. Major inner city renewal, rural diversification, edge of village development, traffic calming measures: all have the potential to enhance or degrade the existing environment and to generate time- and resource-hungry conflict. An early understanding of the character and value of the historic environment prevents conflict and maximises the contribution historic assets can make to future economic growth and community well-being.

Conservation-led regeneration encourages private-sector investment both by retaining businesses in an area and by providing an incentive to relocate to it. Putting resources into a neighbourhood because of the value of what is already there, rather than labelling it as deprived, builds community and business confidence. So do works to improve the maintenance of the public realm of streetscape and public parks and gardens.

Understanding how places change, what makes them distinctive and the significance of their history is the key to regeneration. The historic environment is part of successful regeneration because it contributes to:

Investment: Historic places attract companies to locate, people to live, businesses to invest and tourists to visit. Market values in historic areas are higher than elsewhere.

Sense of place: People enjoy living in historic places. There is often greater community cohesion.

Sustainability: Re-use of historic buildings minimises the exploitation of resources. There is evidence of lower maintenance costs for older houses.

Quality of life: The historic environment contributes to quality of life and enriches people’s understanding of the diversity and changing nature of their community.

Planning for regeneration and renewal requires strong, effective partnerships at local and regional level. Local authorities play a central part in the management of the historic environment. The Local Authority Historic Environment Services pages give more information about the role of local authorities.

Conservation-led regeneration is successful because places matter to people. Neighbourhood renewal works because the quality of the places in which people live directly affects their quality of life. When communities are helped to develop their own sense of what matters for them, and why, the results can transform a neighbourhood and act as a catalyst for further private- and public-sector investment.
Link

Further reading
Regeneration and the Historic Environment
Heritage & Spin-off benefits
Heritage Works
Regeneration in Coastal Towns

Websites
English Heritage Regeneration Policy
The Heritage Dynamo: how the voluntary sector drives regeneration
Prince’s Trust Regeneration Through Heritage Handbook

****

BUILDING IN CONTEXT

Building in Context was published jointly by English Heritage and CABE (the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment) in 2001. It aims to stimulate a high standard of design when development takes place in historically sensitive contexts. It aims to do this by example, showing a series of case studies in which achievement is far above the ordinary. As a result, it is hoped that people will be encouraged to emulate the commitment and dedication shown by the clients, architects, planning officers and committee members involved in the projects illustrated and be able to learn from their experience.

The belief underlying the publication is that the right approach is to be found in examining the context for any proposed development in great detail and relating the new building to its surroundings through an informed character appraisal. This does not imply that any one architectural approach is, by its nature, more likely to succeed than any other. On the contrary, it means that as soon as the application of a simple formula is attempted a project is likely to fail, whether that formula consists of ‘fitting in’ or ‘contrasting the new with the old’.

A successful project will:

● Relate well to the geography and history of the place and the lie of the land
● Sit happily in the pattern of existing development and routes through and around it
● Respect important views
● Respect the scale of neighbouring buildings
● Use materials and building methods which are as high in quality as those used in existing buildings
● Create new views and juxtapositions which add to the variety and texture of the setting.

The right approach involves a whole process in addition to the work of design, from deciding what is needed, through appointing the architect, to early discussions with and eventual approval by the planning authority.

Collaboration, mutual respect and a shared commitment to the vision embodied in the project will be needed if the outcome is to be successful. The report came to a number of conclusions:

● All successful design solutions depend on allowing time for a thorough site analysis and careful character appraisal of the context
● The best buildings result from the creative dialogue between the architect, client, local planning authority and others; pre-application discussions are essential
● The local planning authority and other consultees can insist upon good architecture and help to achieve it
● Difficult sites should generate good architecture, and are not an excuse for not achieving it
● With skill and care, it is possible to accommodate large modern uses within the grain of historic settings
● High environmental standards can help generate good architecture
● Sensitivity to context and the use of traditional materials are not incompatible with contemporary architecture
● Good design does not stop at the front door, but extends into public areas beyond the building
● High-density housing does not necessarily involve building high or disrupting the urban grain and it can be commercially highly successful
● Successful architecture can be produced either by following precedents closely, by adapting them or by contrasting with them
● In a diverse context a contemporary building may be less visually intrusive than one making a failed attempt to follow historic precedents

The above are extracts from the document, which was written by Francis Golding. The case studies were chosen to cover a wide range of different uses, locations, architectural approaches and processes. Each case study looks at the project as a whole, the site, the problems, the solutions and the lessons learnt.

The full text of Building in Context and its case studies are available on-line from the PDF version of the document.
Link

Download
Building in context: New development in historic areas (2.94 MB)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

31 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, Name, People, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Damien Hirst goes eco

Ilfracombe, Devon UK

### wired.co.uk 17 February 2012
Business
Damien Hirst to build 500 sustainable homes in Devon
By Duncan Geere
Artist Damien Hirst has announced plans to build 500 homes in Devon that aim to serve as a model for environmental housing across the UK. The houses will be located in Ilfracombe, on land that’s been owned by Hirst for the past 10 years and a pair of nearby farms. Each will be equipped with photovoltaic panels and concealed wind turbines in the roofs, but be designed to complement existing local buildings.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Inspiration, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Kevin McCloud interview

Interesting comments on contextual housing, and more…

### radio.co.nzSat 24 Sep 2011 at 11:05
Saturday Morning with Kim Hill
Kevin McCloud: grand designs
Architectural historian and designer Kevin McCloud is best known for the television series Grand Designs, and has also made series about Europe, the slums of Mumbai, and urban blight and regeneration. He writes about architecture and people, most recently in the book Kevin McCloud’s 43 Principles of Home: Enjoying Life in the 21st Century (Collins, ISBN: 978-0-00-726548-0), and runs HAB (Happiness Architecture Beauty), building sustainable and contextual housing schemes. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Foresters. Kevin McCloud visits New Zealand for the first time for One Night Only, an evening of design and anecdotes, on 26 October at Auckland’s Civic Theatre. (35′28″)
Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

“Dunedin” – we introduce Transparency International UK

### newsinfo.inquirer.net 9:31am Wed, 15 June 2011
UK failing to address corruption—study
By Cassandra Vinograd – Associated Press
LONDON— Corruption is a much larger problem in Britain than acknowledged and key institutions are refusing to confront the problem, a global watchdog warned Wednesday. Transparency International UK called the findings of its two-year study into corruption in the UK a “corruption health-check” for the country — with a diagnosis of “growing threat, inadequate response”. The group said its research found that corruption is flourishing in some parts of the UK and there is “disturbing evidence” of denial in policy responses to the issue. “There is complacency and a lack of knowledge of the extent of corruption in key sectors and institutions,” according to the study.
Read more

****

The findings show that the tentacles of organised crime increasingly extend to sectors such as prisons and sport where criminal activity and corruption are inextricably linked, affecting businesses, communities, the economy, and society’s most vulnerable groups.

### transparency.org.uk Wed, 15 June 2011
UK fails corruption health check
A report published today by Transparency International UK reveals that corruption is a much greater problem in the UK than recognised and that there is an inadequate response to its growing threat. More than half of the public believe that UK corruption is getting worse. The 3-volume report – the most extensive study into UK corruption ever undertaken – examines 23 sectors and concludes that key institutions are refusing to confront the problem.
Read more

Corruption in the UK: Overview & Policy Recommendations (PDF, 790 KB)
TI-UK Executive Director, Chandrashekhar Krishnan, gives an overview of the findings from the three Corruption in the UK studies, and sets out TI-UK’s policy recommendations.

Corruption In The UK: Part One – National Opinion Survey (PDF, 647 KB)
Results and analysis of an opinion survey of 2,000 UK citizens’ experiences and perceptions of corruption.

Corruption in the UK: Part Two – Assessment of Key Sectors (PDF, 630 KB)
Part two covers the following sectors: Police, National Health Service (NHS), legal profession, prison service, social housing, procurement, sport, City of London, construction, local government and UK Border Agency.

Corruption in the UK: Part Three – NIS Study (PDF, 1 MB)
The NIS study covers the following sectors: Business, civil society, electoral management body, executive, judiciary, law enforcement, media, ombudsman, political parties, public sector and the supreme audit institution.

****

Transparency International UK is a Chapter of the world’s leading non-governmental anti-corruption organisation, Transparency International (TI). With more than 90 Chapters worldwide, and an international secretariat in Berlin, TI has unparalleled global understanding and influence.

Transparency International UK
– raises awareness about corruption
– advocates legal and regulatory reform at national and international levels
– designs practical tools for institutions, individuals and companies wishing to combat corruption
– acts as a leading centre of anti-corruption expertise in the UK.

Corruption is the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. It hurts everyone whose life, livelihood or happiness depends on the integrity of people in a position of authority.

http://www.transparency.org.uk/ @TransparencyUK
http://www.transparency.org/ @anticorruption

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

18 Comments

Filed under Construction, Economics, Events, People, Politics, Project management, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design

UK Tesco Towns + IM Pei’s Oklahoma 1964

### guardian.co.uk Wed 5 May 2010
‘This town has been sold to Tesco’
By Anna Minton
Are towns built by the UK’s leading supermarket the future of urban development?
Imagine living in a Tesco house, sending your child to a Tesco school, swimming in a Tesco pool and, of course, shopping at the local Tesco superstore. According to the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (Cabe), the government’s adviser on architecture and design, this collective monopoly is not an imaginary dystopia. “Tesco Towns” on this model are already being planned across the UK, from Inverness in Scotland to Seaton in Devon.
While the economic downturn has hit many parts of the development industry hard, Tesco recorded profits of nearly £3.4bn last year. Its plans for expansion are reflected by a growing tide of what are described as “supermarket-led mixed-use development proposals” – entire districts of homes, schools and public places built by the company.
Read more

• Anna Minton is the author of Ground Control: Fear and Happiness in the Twenty-first-century City (Penguin, June 2009).

****

### 2 May 2010
Downtown Oklahoma City’s plan revisited
By Steve Lackmeyer
Almost a half century has passed since architect I.M. Pei arrived in Oklahoma City with plans to remake its downtown. And downtown has been a consistent construction zone ever since.
Pei’s plan, which included the demolition of more than 500 buildings, was despised by the city’s locals and outdated in the end, and met its demise in the late 1980s.
A major exhibit of the plan, including a model created by Pei and his firm, is being put on display at the Cox Convention Center starting Monday.
Made of wood and plastic, each inch of the 10-foot-by-12-foot model equals 50 feet of land. Without the advancements of modern technology, this model likely took a sizeable team six months or more to construct by hand. Though the model cost $60,000 to create in 1964, Norman-based architectural model builder Wiley White estimates the display would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars today.
Read more + Video + 3 Photos

17 May 2010 – D Day for public airing of the Tertiary Campus Development Plan (a rose by by another name…) in the University of Otago ISB Link, off Cumberland St.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

After 2012 Olympics, the legacy is…

### architectsjournal.co.uk 27 January, 2010
Olympics site to become huge parkland post Games
By Merlin Fulcher
The 2012 Olympic site will become a public park when the games finish, according to plans unveiled this week. The scheme by landscape architects Hargreaves Associates will turn 101 ha of former industrial land into the UK’s largest new urban park since the early twentieth century.

Avenues of trees and hedges will be used to provide a ‘welcoming entrance’ to the area, and more than 4,000 semi-mature British-grown trees will be planted across the Olympic Park and Olympic Village.
Read more + Images

Related posts:
12.11.09 Zaha Hadid: ‘Gateway into the Games’ London 2012 Olympics
25.3.09 London 2012 Stadium legacy plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Fun, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Urban design

Urban regeneration: knowing where potential lies

The past decade has created a flood of carbon copy useless ‘new’ city centres…

### guardian.co.uk Tuesday 29 December 2009 10.13 GMT
2000 to 2009: Reviews of the decade
Regeneration in the noughties
By Tom James
I moved to Sheffield in 2000. Back then, it was a pretty mad place: a post-Blade-Runner-city of soviet-style car parks, motorways through the city centre and pedestrians herded into underpasses. Knackered, empty and full of potential.
Regeneration seemed to offer an opportunity to change all that, to turn the city into something amazing. My friends and I dreamed of old factories full of art and music; of our brutalist heritage restored; of derelict cooling towers turned into Tate Moderns of the north. We realised pretty quickly that this was a little ambitious.
Read more

-Tom James is an urban activist and writer.

****

Follow the link above for more Guardian articles on Regeneration, including:

30.12.09 Public space in the noughties by Anna Minton, author of Ground Control: Fear and Happiness in the 21st Century City, published by Penguin.
This should have been the decade of public space but, instead, areas are increasing becoming privately owned and controlled.

20.11.09 Politicians must acknowledge the value of volunteering
Don’t pay us lip service, recognise the part we play in regenerating communities, says Brenda Grixti, Manager of Benchill Community Centre in Wythenshawe.

5.8.09 Legacy of the docks
It is time to rethink the London Docklands development as simply a struggle between powerless locals and ‘yuppie’ colonisers, says former resident Michael Collins.

****

### localknowledge.mercatus.org Friday, January 1, 2010
Caring Communities: The Role of Nonprofits in Rebuilding the Gulf Coast
By Peter J. Boettke
The idea of “social entrepreneurship”—innovation in the philanthropic sector to fill in the gaps left by both the market sector and the state sector—has become a hot topic in the last decade. People increasingly wonder how nonprofit enterprises and social entrepreneurs can effectively mimic the successes of the market economy in increasing human welfare, choice, and dignity without either the profit-loss system of markets or the democratic and constitutional checks of the public sector.

The face-to-face forces of reputation and community membership not only coordinate highly effective small-scale projects that support those in need, but they provide a sense of community and identity to us all.

This issue of Local Knowledge seeks to pay attention to and increase our understanding of the necessity and vitality of such associations and the work of social entrepreneurs in society, both in normal times and in those that are most trying.
Read more

-Peter J. Boettke is University Professor of Economics at George Mason University and Vice President of Research, Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

4 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design