Tag Archives: Trains

Auckland launches electric trains

Auckland train [Auckland Transport] 1The first electric trains roll out tomorrow (Auckland Transport)

### 3news.co.nz Saturday 26 Apr 2014 7:00a.m.
Long wait for electric trains almost over
By Dan Satherley – Online Reporter
Almost a century ago, transport officials proposed electrifying Auckland’s nascent rail network. Tomorrow those plans become reality, with the public launch of the city’s first electric trains. All 5000 tickets for the inaugural rides, which start at 10am, were snapped up within 24 hours. Passengers will be taken from Britomart to Newmarket and back on the first of the 57 new trains to go into service.

“Our catchline is smarter, better, quieter, all those things. They’re much more efficient, they use a lot less energy, they are much, much quieter and they are much more reliable.”

Auckland Transport media manager Mark Hannan says the upgrade has been a long time coming. The current diesel-powered trains were purchased from Perth at scrap metal prices after the West Australian city electrified its network in the early 1990s. The first of the electric trains will be taking fare-paying passengers on the Onehunga line from Monday, and by the middle of next year all of the old locomotives will be history.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Trains for RWC 2011?

### ODT Online Mon, 10 Jan 2011
Trains part of Cup plan
By Hamish McNeilly
Suburban and inner city trains could be back on Dunedin railway tracks during this year’s Rugby World Cup, it has been revealed. Taieri Gorge Railway chief executive Murray Bond confirmed to the Otago Daily Times the tourism train operator was investigating opportunities during the tournament.

Taieri Gorge [is] yet to talk to rugby officials about the proposal.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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‘Demolition of the Paris Metro’ by sleepycity

[Excerpts] “On 20 April 1896 the project to construct an underground transportation system for the city of Paris began. Four short years later the Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris (CMP) opened their first line, running east-west from Porte Maillot–Porte de Vincennes. Not long after that the CMP was joined by the Société du chemin de fer électrique souterrain Nord-Sud de Paris (Nord-Sud) and between the two companies almost all of the 10 lines initially planned for Paris were built by 1920. Initially these lines served only the city of Paris (the snobby residents even went to far as to ensure the metro ran right hand side, to guarantee non-interoperability with the left hand side system in the suburbs) but in the 30’s – 50’s the suburbs were finally connected. Today Paris’ metro is still growing and changing through constant renovations, line extensions and currently the conversion of more lines to use the driverless robotrains like those of line 14…

Back in October 2007 sometime after midnight and before the first trains rolled into regular service, qx and I took our first timid steps onto the tracks of the Paris metro. With more nervousness and care than I’d like to admit we gingerly stepped down between the metal rails just off the end of a platform wondering what madness had possessed us to do so. We’d never done Metro like this before and this scary new world was full of elements we didn’t understand at all…

Before developing a deeper appreciation of the system we were drawn initially to the abandoned stations. Some of these seem totally abandoned and haven’t been reappropriated for other uses, some have become RATP storage and others, even more rare, were never even open to the public…”

Photo essay at sleepycity
Blog author: dsankt

Tweet name and profile: sleepycity @dsankt Europe
World wandering hobo with camera, seeking adventure involving: sewers, drains, metro, subway, bridges, mines, abandonments, industry, infrastructure.

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D Scene – South Dunedin library, Hillside, RWC 2011

### D Scene 26-5-10

Former councillor welcomes news (page 5)
News that negotiations for a potential site for the South Dunedin library are all but finalised has been welcomed by former St Kilda councillor Anne Turvey.

Turvey said the issue is greater than that of the simple provision of a library.

{continues} #bookmark

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Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 8)
Your say: Letters to the editor
Give New Zealand workshops a go by Stuart McKenzie, Dunedin
In a dream world by Jimmy Jones, Caversham
#bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Details: The finer points (pages 9 -10)
South in a spin
By Mike Houlahan
Planning is already well in train to make sure Rugby World Cup 2011 will be about more than just the games. Rugby World Cup chief executive Martin Snedden is, naturally, taking a keen interest in whether Dunedin is ready to host its allotted Rugby World Cup games next year. But it is the combined promotional campaign devised by Otago and Southland councils and tourism organisations that has got him really excited.

“Have you seen the Spin It Wide DVD?”

{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

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Biz: Crunching the numbers (pages 12-13)
Light at the end of tunnel?
KiwiRail’s Hillside workshop is a hive of activity right now, but remains a shadow of its former self. Mike Houlahan considers the past, present and future of a Dunedin landmark. Amid the smashes and the clashes that are KiwiRail’s Hillside Workshops hard at work, it’s easy to forget that the workforce at the South Dunedin institution is about 10 per cent of what it once was.

Today, Hillside employs 185 staff. A few decades ago, when rail was the dominant means of moving freight and people around New Zealand, more than a thousand people worked at Hillside, building and maintaining locomotives and carriages.

{continues} #bookmark

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Scarfie: Life on campus (page 19)
Audacious winners: Design Studies students do well in entrepreneur competition
Designing a future
By Gavin Bertram
Last week the ten winners of the NBR 24/7 Audacious Business Idea Competition were announced, and four were from Design Studies. That’s not a bad return from the University of Otago department that is soon for the chop – an irony not lost on the students.
{continues} #bookmark

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DScene – Public libraries, Hillside Workshops, stadium, pools

### DScene 19-5-10
Book it in (page 1)
The long-awaited South Dunedin Library looks to be on the horizon, with Dunedin City Council coming closer to a final deal on a site. See page 3. #bookmark

Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Harsh economic lesson taught at Hillside (page 2)
Dunedin was taught a brutal economic lesson last week, when KiwiRail confirmed its preliminary view that it would not tender for its own contract to build railcarriages and engines for Auckland.
{continues} #bookmark

Council set to finalise deal (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council is about to finalise a deal on a potential location for the South Dunedin library. City property manager Robert Clark, who has been negotiating with an undisclosed vendor, said he expected to secure a site for the proposed library in the next three weeks to a month.
{continues} #bookmark

Factory staff uncertain of future (page 3)
By Mike Houlahan
Work programmes at KiwiRail’s Hillside workshops are decided for the next two years, but the 185 staff employed there remain unsure what will happen after the factory’s current contracts end.
{continues} #bookmark

Snedden checks stadium progress (page 5)
By Mike Houlahan
Rugby World Cup chief executive Martin Snedden has been checking progress on the construction of the Forsyth Barr at University Plaza stadium as his top priority for his visit to Dunedin this Friday. Snedden’s Dunedin visit is the latest in a series of excursions around the country, to the various towns and cities hosting Rugby World Cup matches.
{continues} #bookmark

Raising the roof (page 5)
The 398 tonne, 130m long roof truss for the Forsyth Barr multi-purpose roofed stadium in Dunedin, was lifted 35m into the sky at the weekend. The challenging five-hour operation could only be achieved in spcific weather conditions.
{continues} #bookmark

The Rugby World Cup itself, the Webb Ellis Cup, will be on show in Dunedin on Friday. TVNZ’s Breakfast weather presenter Tamati Coffey is touring the country, and will be broadcast live from the Art Gallery in the Octagon, from 6.30-8.30am. Two pool game ticket packs will be given away to the best dressed rugby fan.

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Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 8)
Your say: Letters to the editor
Landmark to the rich by Harvey Kong Tin, South Dunedin
Stadium issues by Lee Vandervis, Roslyn
#bookmark

Details: The finer points (page 10)
Library plot twist
By Wilma McCorkindale
A sudden plot twist last week has mystified readers of the continuing mystery entitled “Where will Dunedin’s new public library be built?” The main character in the story, the former Dunedin Chief Post Office building in the Exchange, had loomed as the most likely suspect in this “where-will-we-do-it” saga. But the plot thickened last week after the building was sold to another buyer whose four-star hotel plans mean the city’s books must find accommodation somewhere else.
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Library needs overhaul according to report (page 11)
In its report to the council in December 2005, Octa backed [Dunedin Public Libraries chief librarian] Bernie Hawke on the need for a South Dunedin library but also said that the Dunedin Public Library needed to be redeveloped. The library building, tucked in behind the staircased Dunedin Civic Centre, was designed in the 1970s and built in 1981.
{continues} #bookmark

Little library needs a helping hand (page 11)
After almost a century of people borrowing from its shelves, St Kilda Community Library is asking folk to lend it a hand. It is looking to boost a small six-strong team of volunteer librarians, its dwindling membership, and its stack of titles, library committee president Gillian Lemon said.
{continues} #bookmark

Taking shape (page 12)
By Mike Houlahan
A year into Hillside Engineering’s newest contract, workers can begin to see the finished product take shape. Well, one-third of it anyway. This week the KiwiRail-operated workshop unveiled its latest work in progress, carriages for the sightseeing trains the TranzCoastal and the TranzAlpine.
{continues} #bookmark

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Game: Beyond the scoreboard (page 20)
Pool problems
Dunedin’s pools are a success story, with the four main council-managed pools racking up three quarters of a million visits in the 2008/09 financial year. However, all that glitters isn’t gold. Huge demand by casual and fitness swimmers for their turn in the city’s pools has in turn limited access to the water for competitive swimmers and pool sports such as water polo.
{continues} #bookmark

A recent report commissioned by the Dunedin City Council on pool services suggested a three-pronged strategy: upgrades at Moana and St Clair pools, new business practices, and a new pool at Mosgiel and a new inner city training pool.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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RWC trains: corporate travel or rowdyism?

### ODT Online Wed, 31 Mar 2010
World Cup train option between Christchurch, Dunedin
By Mark Price
Rugby fans could have the option of travelling by train between Dunedin and Christchurch during the Rugby World Cup next year. KiwiRail communications manager Nigel Parry confirmed yesterday the company was considering running special trains to matches in both cities.
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