Tag Archives: Tower buildings

Hotel: The height of arrogance

Don’t care how much you’ve spent on slapping Dunedin’s face, chook.
GO AWAY —give your ‘Swarovski crystal’ to some other place.

Bored housewife syndrome:
If you’ve spent a million already your consultants are out of control.

### ODT Online Fri, 14 Feb 2014
Harbour hotel now ‘a long shot’
By Chris Morris
The woman behind the plan to build a $100 million waterfront hotel in Dunedin says the proposal is now “a long shot”. Betterways Advisory Ltd director Jing Song, of Queenstown, told the Otago Daily Times she was frustrated by the delays and cost involved, after spending more than $1 million so far on pursuing the project at 41 Wharf St.
Read more

DEPLORABLY, Mayor Cull has held several meetings with the developers in Auckland “to try to advance the project”. The Mayor deliberately mixes HIS politics with a resource management matter, SHAME.

*Mr Rodgers is Mr Cull’s personal solicitor.

Related Post and Comments:
25.6.13 Hotel/Apartment Tower decision to be appealed

For more, enter *hotel* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Heritage, Hot air, Hotel, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Queenstown Lakes, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Dunedin (apartments) Hotel: Better ways to lipstick a pig

Dunedin Hotel proposed [via newstalkzb.co.nz]Dunedin Hotel proposed [stuff.co.nz]Dunedin Hotel proposed [screenshots from fly-by video by ARL]

Let’s “Articulate” the Dunedin waterfront, let’s sculpt and distort ideas of cheap tower design, or hey, we could use explosives. We’re not the first to think of it —the “prettying the tombstone” part.

This is late reply to the evidence to hearing from Auckland’s Jeremy Whelan of Ignite Architects, entitled Dunedin Hotel Design Direction Analysis, dated 18 March 2013, for Betterways Advisory Ltd (applicant).

Whelan presented 16 “exemplars” of “design directions” for the proposed tower at 41 Wharf Street. These outlined possible(?) cladding and modelling options —none of which were part of the actual application for resource consent. Previously, we had listened to Dunedin architect Francis Whitaker wax lyrical on the considerable merits of the slab design for an interminable three hours in submission —it would be an insult to call the pronouncements ‘evidence’. Unsurprisingly, by the time Whelan came to trot his stuff ALL had become uncomfortably strained in the Edinburgh Room despite a toothy semblance of tolerance shown by the hearing panel.

The following images are selected and scanned from photocopy evidence of Whelan’s 25-page PowerPoint presentation, thus drop-off in picture quality and sharpness. Nonetheless, you can see where he’s headed, to win the panel… (it simply wasn’t enough that Animation Research Ltd had removed the rail corridor to ‘contextualise’ the tower by rendering fake gulags up to its base).

The exemplars were presented in the serious hope that resource consent would be granted for a near 100-metre tall building that (at the time) had not been “designed” or detailed sufficiently clearly by the applicant.
Enjoy. [click to enlarge]

Dunedin Hotel Design Direction Analysis p2Exemplar 1 Smooth skin frameless glazed - W Hotel Barcelona Spain p3Exemplar 2 Mixed reflectivity - Boulevard Plaza, Dubai p4Exemplar 4 Overlaid facade modulation - Hearst Tower, New York p7Exemplar 5 Modulation with facade depth and materiality - Langham Xin Tian Di, China p9Exemplar 6 Banding using glass colour - Mandarin Oriental, Macau p10Exemplar 7 Accentuation of vertical form - Mandarin Oriental Las Vegas p11Exemplar 9 Horizontal detail with solar control - RBC Waterpark Place, Toronto p13Exemplar 10 Multiple colours and reflectivity - Ritz Carlton Las Vegas p14Exemplar 12 Building form clearly expresses base, middle and top - Shangri La Pudong Shanghai p18Exemplar 14 Crowning element - Sydney Tower proposed p20Exemplar 15 Strong horizontal delineation expressing each floor level - Main Admin Building Stadtsparkasse, Dusseldorf p21Exemplar 16 Solid elements expressed in facade - Novotel Auckland Airport p22Dunedin Hotel - 41 Wharf Street Dunedin, Conclusions p25

Betterways Advisory Ltd is a company directed by Steve Rodgers, a Dunedin solicitor. For a very short time Jing Song was appointed as a director of Betterways —her directorship started and ended (or so it appears) the same day that Wharf Street Property Ltd was incorporated.

From NZ Companies Office records:
Former Director (Betterways Advisory Ltd)
Full legal name: Jing SONG
Residential Address: 56 Old Coach Way, Rd 3, Drury 2579, New Zealand
Appointment Date: 05 Apr 2013
Ceased date: 05 Apr 2013

LMW Trust Ltd is the sole shareholder for both Betterways Advisory Ltd and Wharf Street Property Ltd. Steve Rodgers is co-director/shareholder for LMW Trust Ltd, with solicitor and vineyard owner Evan Moore. LMW Trust is a shareholder in other (wine-based) companies directed by Jing Song.

█ Further to Jeremy Whelan’s art of persuasion (gasp, where was the budget?) here’s a sample of manipulated images that might equally apply.

### dezeen.com 8 January 2014
Photographer Victor Enrich turns a Munich hotel upside down and inside out
A hotel in Munich is stretched, twisted, distorted and exploded in a series of 88 manipulated photographs by Spanish photographer Victor Enrich.
Enrich, who also works as a 3D architectural visualiser, based the series on one view of the Deutscher Kaiser hotel, a building he passed regularly during a two-month stay in the city. Some images show parts of the building turned on their sides, while others show sections of it duplicated or sliced away. Some shots show it curving into different shapes and some show it pulled it apart.
Describing the manipulation process, Enrich says: “What I basically do is create a 3D virtual environment out of a 2D photograph. The process involves capturing the perspective, then the geometry, then the materials and finally the lighting. The techniques I use are often described as ‘camera matching’ or ‘perspective matching’ and several 3D software packages provide functionalities that allow you to perform this.” He does a lot of the work by hand to “reach the level of detail needed to achieve high photorealism”.
Read more + Images

Deutscher Kaiser hotel, Munich - image by Victor Enrich [dezeen.com] 4aDeutscher Kaiser hotel, Munich - image by Victor Enrich [dezeen.com] 11aDeutscher Kaiser hotel, Munich - image by Victor Enrich [dezeen.com] 3aDeutscher Kaiser hotel, Munich - image by Victor Enrich [dezeen.com] 7aDeutscher Kaiser hotel, Munich - image by Victor Enrich [dezeen.com] 1a

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Design, Fun, Hotel, Innovation, Media, Name, Pics, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design