Tag Archives: Tourism Dunedin

Whaleoil on “dodgy ratbag local body politicians” —just like ours at DCC

Whale Oil Beef Hooked logo### whaleoil.co.nz Fri, 31 Oct 2014 at 5:20pm
Why is there no law to rein in dodgy ratbag local body politicians?
By Cameron Slater
Former ARC Councillor Bill Burrill is not the first dodgy ratbag Councillor to trough from abuses of power to his own pecuniary advantage in recent years. A few years back in 2009 Council Watch was calling for a number of Councillors from the Canterbury Regional Council to be prosecuted and sacked from their positions after an investigation by the Auditor General Lyn Provost found that four individuals had broken the law by acting in conflict with their official role. Back then those Canterbury Councillors failed to declare a conflict on interest that [led] to a financial benefit for themselves by participating in discussion and voting on proposals before Council. Under investigation the Auditor General’s office chose not to prosecute stating that whilst the Councillors should have withdrawn as a matter of principle – they had each received and shared legal advice that they could participate. And here in lies the problem. The Auditor General and Office of the Ombudsmen publish clear guidelines for Councillors and council staff but the reality is that the law is erroneously filled with holes that are exploited and there is precious little oversight of Local Government leading to the Auditor General loathing to bother and the Courts uninterested.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Carisbrook, Citifleet, Construction, CST, Cycle network, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, Democracy, Design, DVL, DVML, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Geography, Highlanders, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZTA, ORFU, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design

Dunedin old boys, councillors & staff collude on 5-star accommodation

WWRHD

The following report was tabled at a meeting of the Dunedin City Council on Monday 22 September 2014:

Report – Council – 22/09/2014 (PDF, 3.8 MB)
Tourism Dunedin Annual Report

Oh dear, oh dear. Ex Tourism Dunedin chief Hamish Saxton says…. “The Tourism Dunedin report showed Dunedin’s total visitor nights increased 7.4%, to 826,431, in the year to May 2014, with domestic visitors up 6.3% and international visitors up 9.2%.”

Add this next report to bolster confidence and supply for old boy in-groups and the ever pea-brain assortment of city councillors – and the megalomaniac council staff who NEVER waste an opportunity to empire build or focus pressure in pursuit of higher salaried positions:

Report – Council – 22/09/2014 (PDF, 271.8 KB)
Growth Assumptions in the Long Term Plan

The message is, since We know grand theft auto already…. “We want CAKE! Want it now!” so, “Let’s be having it, Ratepayers, empty your sorry pockets for Our Edification, Delight and Comfortable Pay Cheques, for We at DCC don’t stand a F***’s chance of ever knowing how to create real jobs in the productive export sector. Give us FIVE STAR, now!!”

Nor was it their business.

### ODT Online Wed, 24 Sep 2014
City needs to offer visitors five-star hotel – report
By Chris Morris
Tourism Dunedin has left a call for more money, a five-star hotel and closer links with Queenstown ringing in the Dunedin City Council’s ears. The comments came from former Tourism Dunedin trustee Rainsford Grubb as he presented the now-defunct entity’s final annual report to the council this week. The report came months after Tourism Dunedin was subsumed by Enterprise Dunedin, an in-house council entity responsible for a broader mix of tourism, events and other activities, on June 30.
Read more

****

Who is right?

Comment at ODT Online:

Targeted taxes
Submitted by Stevesone57 on Wed, 24/09/2014 – 11:25am.
….The fact is that motels and hotels in Dunedin have been hovering around 60% occupancy for three years now. Anyone in the industry will tell you this is nothing more than break even. It is clear that this announcement by Mr Grubb is the precursor for targeted [taxes] to promote Dunedin’s wonders. Targeted taxes on businesses already struggling to survive – these include hotels, motels, bars, cafes etc….
Read more

█ Recordings of council meetings are on the DCC YouTube channel.

Arrow Knee 1

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

9 Comments

Filed under Business, Citifleet, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Geography, Hot air, Hotel, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZTA, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Port Otago tidies up! —Tourism Dunedin #FAIL

Industry group Cruise New Zealand says it had complaints from 11 cruise lines about harrassment of passengers on the wharf and the security of open port access, which it says does not happen anywhere else in the world. (RNZ)

Tourism Dunedin chief executive Hamish Saxton said it was an ”overstatement” Dunedin had a bad reputation as a cruise destination and the ”excellent” efforts last year to deal with increased passenger and crew numbers should not be undermined by some ”minor incidents”. (ODT)

Port Chalmers [otago.ac.nz]

### RNZ News Mon, 1 Jul 2013 Updated 15 minutes ago
Tourist operators kicked off Dunedin wharf
Dunedin’s port company has banned tourism operators from the wharf after widespread complaints from cruise ship operators about cowboy activities. The problems have continued despite an accreditation system launched last year to vet operators. Port Otago commercial manager Peter Brown said very small number of operators abused the privilege of being on the wharf and the accreditation programme was unable to deal with that. Mr Brown says the port company has decided from October all tourist operators will wait outside the port’s gates and the city council’s information centre will handle booking and direct passengers.
RNZ Link

****

Dunedin’s reputation with cruise lines is among the world’s worst, and behind the soured image are badly behaved tour operators. –Cruise New Zealand (ODT)

### ODT Online Mon, 1 Jul 2013
Dunedin cruise image soured
By Rosie Manins
Complaints have been made about tour operators fighting among themselves, sleeping in vehicles to secure prime wharf positions and being abusive to cruise passengers at Port Chalmers. Accordingly, Port Otago has banned operators from the wharf for the next summer cruise season.
Up to 47 tour providers accessed the wharf each cruise day during the 2012-13 season. Port Otago received complaints directly from passengers, cruise lines and other tour operators, as well as an expression of concern from Cruise New Zealand.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
17.5.13 Dunedin: city marketing @@@
3.3.13 Tourism Dunedin —city councillors not convinced
17.10.12 “But there’s more to Dunedin than just bloody cruise ships’’
9.1.12 Dunedin’s turn to shine, says Travel Wire Asia
30.3.11 Dunedin tourism online
28.12.09 Dunedin cruise ship seasons
4.11.09 Lonely Planet. Dunedin rave.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Port Chalmers [otago.ac.nz]

8 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, University of Otago, Urban design

Shrinkwrap the Mayor of Dunedin —Cull snubs Dalai Lama #shame

Shortsighted removal of diplomacy by ‘city leader’.

There were also no plans to stage a civic reception for the Dalai Lama, Mr Cull said yesterday. He defended both decisions, describing the Nobel Peace Prize laureate as “a representative of a minority religious faith” and questioning the benefit of engaging with him. –ODT

Politically awkward, after DCC/COC flying visits to Shanghai.

The decision was confirmed publicly just days after Mr Cull led a Dunedin delegation to Shanghai to help foster closer ties with one of the communist powerhouse’s major economic centres. –ODT

British Prime Minister David Cameron met the Dalai Lama last year. He was duly scolded by China and later cancelled a state visit after strong indications he would not be granted meetings with senior figures. –ODT

Good on former mayor Sukhi Turner for speaking up !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

### ODT Online Tue, 30 Apr 2013
Mayor denies bowing to wishes of China over Dalai Lama’s visit
By Chris Morris
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull’s decision to sidestep a speaking engagement with the Dalai Lama appears to be aimed at avoiding the ire of China, a University of Otago academic, Dr Nicholas Khoo, says. However, the move has backfired in the eyes of former Dunedin mayor Sukhi Turner, who said the city was in danger of adopting a ”cargo cult mentality” and becoming ”supplicants to China”. It was confirmed yesterday Mr Cull had declined an invitation by tour organisers to introduce the Dalai Lama at a public talk in the Dunedin Town Hall, before up to 2000 people, on June 11.
Read more

****

### ODT Online Tue, 30 Apr 2013
Who else has sidestepped the Dalai Lama?
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull has some high-profile company when it comes to sidestepping the Dalai Lama. US President Barack Obama and Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard are among political leaders who have declined to meet the Tibetan spiritual leader.
Read more

[St Farry suggested the Dalai Lama could be a use for the stadium, wtf]

****

The Royal Society carries news coverage of THAT ‘cargo cult’ address:

Turner slams business mentality in ‘state of city’ speech
Posted: Tue, 23 Apr 1996 under Science in the News

Dunedin, April 23 – Dunedin should abandon its “big industry fetish” and encourage smaller, environmentally-friendly businesses, Dunedin Mayor Sukhi Turner said in her first “State of the City” speech last night.

Addressing combined members of Dunedin Lions Clubs, she pushed a strong “green” message in her vision of Dunedin’s economic future. The city’s first obligation was to stop behaving like primitive tribespeople, expecting foreigners to bring jobs and prosperity into the town, she said.

She rejected recent public accusations of being seen as opposed to development and “a very poor advocate” for Dunedin. But she said the cargo-cult mentality among Dunedin’s business community was a major obstacle to any serious discussion of the city’s future.

“Whether it be an aluminium smelter at Aramoana, a meat-processing plant on the Taieri or an environmentally suspect timber mill… the message is the same: only monstrous, ecologically damaging and socially destructive projects, preferably foreign-owned and financed, can rescue Dunedin’s fortunes.”

Many people saw environmental and developmental concerns as diametrically opposed. But in modern thinking the two were integrated imperatives.

“An industry that throws chemically stable toxic waste into our ecosystems is storing up disaster for us all.

“It is not a question of the environment versus development, it is simply a question of how much we are going to pay and when.”

Dunedin City Council and Otago Chamber of Commerce and Industry should be helping out small, knowledge-based businesses such as Animation Research Ltd which had developed computer graphic technology for America’s Cup races.

Dunedin would never again dominate New Zealand’s economy and its residents must stop trying to recapture a past which had gone forever, she said.

Education and health were two crucial industries under-pinning the city’s economy. Both could help generate whole clusters of subsidiary enterprises based on knowledge resources ready-to-hand at tertiary institutions.

“Small-scale, knowledge-based, high-tech and environmentally-friendly industries do not only open up the prospect of lucrative export contracts, they play to the strengths of the Dunedin community with its solid tradition of smallness and deep-seated love of learning,” Mrs Turner said.

After the speech she said she was not opposed to large-scale industry, as long as it “made sense”, was pollution-free and met Resource Management Act regulations.

However, the belief that salvation would come from large businesses was simplified reasoning. “It doesn’t work like that,” she said.
NZPA ODT ps 23/04/96 09-38NZ
RS Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

31 Comments

Filed under Business, CST, DCC, Economics, Events, Geography, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Stadiums, Tourism, University of Otago

ODT “stories” —parochial sun rays

Email received from Grahame Sydney
Saturday, 27 April 2013 1:22 p.m.

re ODT

My heart goes out to the loyal reporters at the ODT having to file garbage promotional stories extolling the fabulousness and phenomenal success of the Plastic Stadium, most of which “stories” are given front page treatment: since when did a “story” on the Aerosmith gear-haulage convoy rate as front page “news”, let alone the disgraceful banner headline and page-wide photograph of the band performing (“SILVER SPANGLED SPECTACLE” -Thursday 25 April) ? Is there no limit to the depths to which the editorial staff at ODT will sink in order to underwrite the foundering stadium, at the cost of editorial integrity ?

But while such transparent commercialism makes the opening of the ODT an increasingly difficult daily ritual, testing to the limits one’s own parochial tendencies, and the assault of full-page advertisements (7 in the first 22 page section today, not counting half-page ads…) makes the reading an habitual speed-read, is there any explanation for the strange appearance on page 12 today (27.3.13) of a colourful little child’s world picture of six happy Small People, one on a bike, one with a pet dog, two with a ball, all beaming innocently as yellow sun rays glow from a distant unseen horizon and five dinky, driverless vehicles crowd the streets ?

ODT 27.4.13 advertisement (page 12) 1

Below this merry fantasy is the exhortation: “Spend QUALITY TIME” at Dunedin’s intersections… there’s so much to see !”

No clue offered as to who is responsible for this mysterious insertion, nor why, what it might mean, or who it is aimed at. If it’s the DCC Traffic people, the message is highly questionable. Perhaps it’s the start of a new branding exercise, in the “It’s All Right Here” mould. If it’s a new campaign from the city’s tourist promotional wing, embarking on a bold new initiative to identify the REAL attractions of the town – I can see the entrance billboards and the bumper-stickers now: IGNORE THE HOTEL: COME AND EXPERIENCE OUR INTERSECTIONS !” – then someone needs to be singled out and front-paged for their imaginative genius.

It’d be a change from yet another damned propagandist sell on the Stadium, if nothing else.

[ends]

Dunedin city was ranked at the top of the agency’s [NZTA] list for urban intersection crashes causing either fatal or serious injuries during the five years from 2006 to 2010. The city also featured in the top five for the crash categories involving pedestrians (second), motorcycles (third), older drivers (third), cyclists (fourth) and young drivers (fourth), and ranked sixth for accidents caused by distracted drivers. ODT 24.3.12

Dunedin is ranked the third-worst local authority area in New Zealand for fatal and serious injury crashes, statistics in the NZTA’s “communities at risk” register show. The NZTA has compiled lists ranking local authorities across 12 categories, although there is some contention about the methodology used to record the statistics. ODT 23.10.11

Related Post and Comments:
6.2.13 Editorial bias

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

8 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Design, Economics, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Stadiums, Tourism

*fashionable* Heritage Dunedin and the RMA holocaust

Dunedin Railway Station (nakedbus.com) screenshotCouncil-owned Dunedin Railway Station

### ODT Online Sun, 21 Apr 2013
Council says heritage buildings under threat
By Chris Morris
Important heritage buildings in Dunedin could be lost if proposed changes to the Resource Management Act (RMA) are confirmed, the Dunedin City Council says. The council’s concerns about historic architectural losses were articulated in a submission to the Ministry for the Environment, in response to a raft of proposed RMA changes recently unveiled by Environment Minister Amy Adams.
Proposed changes included the Resource Reform Management Bill, introduced last December, which was before a select committee and had closed a call for public submissions. Among the proposals was the removal of a reference to the ”protection of” historic heritage, which would be replaced with wording requiring recognition of, and provision for, ”the importance and value” of historic heritage.

”Important heritage buildings valued by the community could be lost when insignificant weight is given both to the importance of heritage to Dunedin’s residents, and to the growing significance of the city’s buildings on a national and international level, following the losses in Christchurch.”

Councillors have already been warned uncertainty over key new phrases proposed for the RMA might need to be tested in the courts, and the council’s submission warned the change ”diminishes the importance of historic heritage”.
Read more

****

Rosemary McLeod (BayofPlentyTimes)### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/04/2013
City wears its history with pride
By Rosemary McLeod
How can Dunedin fashion have a reputation for Gothic gloom, when early autumn showcases clear skies and a harbour like pale-blue glass and unexpected sunshine roasts me in my pessimistic woollies? The city has turned on idyllic weather for iD Dunedin Fashion Week, from March 10 to 17.
With barely a whisper of wind, reddening leaves dangle in the city’s parks and gardens as if by spider threads, viburnums are a mass of clear red berries, and the hillside of 19th-century stone and brick houses overlooking town declares a rooted solidity among greenery, even if we have all become nervous of such buildings because of what happened in that other city.

Since havoc was wreaked on Christchurch, Dunedin could seem more remote than ever, an add-on at the bottom of that big island, but it has always had its own distinct character and its old buildings are integral to that.

Before Auckland, this was where money was, and lots of it. It was the financial and population hub of the country and it was built to last long before nonsense like leaky homes. Dunedin is what Auckland isn’t.

iD Dunedin Fashion Show 2013 photomerge Protecting Dunedin’s design heritage

If I had my way, it would have a vast dome over it, keeping it like this for posterity, because we have nothing else like it and will never create it again.

I could go on about the past, because it’s all around you in Dunedin, a city with a main street still at its heart, where you can still do your shopping instead of driving to suburban malls, where the local privately owned newspaper seems untouched by media challenges elsewhere and where I’ve trawled the second-hand shops over the years and made great discoveries.

Where populations stay put, so does their stuff. You dig here for a different kind of gold than the prospectors, who brought wealth here 150-odd years ago, but in its own way it’s just as exciting.

There are two museums and one public art gallery, all thriving, for a population of about 120,000. Independent retailers still exist on the main street. There are no vulgar high-rise buildings, although a developer desperately wants to build a 40-storeyed hotel. Yet in the midst of its rather smug history, Dunedin is held together not by the past but the future. Education is its core business.

Like a wise old parent, it puts up with the antics of the students so vital to its economy, stopping short of hysterics when they really put tolerance to the test, which is why, as its Fashion Week shows, Dunedin isn’t fusty.
Read more

● Rosemary McLeod was hosted by Tourism Dunedin.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Images: Dunedin Railway Station via nakedbus.com (top), craiglawson.net (middle), seenindunedin.co.nz (bottom); Rosemary McLeod via bayofplentytimes.co.nz

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, NZHPT, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Tourism Dunedin —city councillors not convinced

### ODT Online Sun, 3 Mar 2013
Tourism bright side seen
By Debbie Porteous
A series of unmet targets led Dunedin city councillors this week to question whether Tourism Dunedin could handle more responsibility. […] The questions came as councillors considered Tourism Dunedin’s half-year report to September [2012], which showed a decline in guest nights in the city, including a sharp 17.5% fall in international visitor nights despite an increase in domestic visitor nights. Dunedin was the only Otago area with a decline in international guest nights.

Cr Paul Hudson pointed out that of 18 targets with known outcomes at that stage, Tourism Dunedin was on track to meet, or had met, only seven. He questioned whether the council, which is about to form a single city marketing agency led by Tourism Dunedin, should be giving the organisation more responsibility. [our emphasis]

Cr Teresa Stevenson asked that a list of the specific projects and work Tourism Dunedin was doing to achieve its goals be included in future reports.
Read more

Report – Council – 25/02/2013 (PDF, 1.7 MB)
Tourism Dunedin 2012-2013 Half Yearly Report

Posted By Elizabeth Kerr

27 Comments

Filed under #eqnz, Business, DCC, Economics, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Tourism