Tag Archives: Tertiary Campus Area

STUPIDLY EXPENSIVE crossings, legal status? —Not universally recognised road markings

zebra-crossing-by-marian-kamensky-caglecartoons-com-1The urban design team(?!) lost it before they ever got it.

At Facebook, Alan Wilson says: “My concern is the cost. $140,000 for two crossings. Too many other things need money spent on upgrading”

Tony McAuliffe says: “….The Zebra crossing works, in part, ’cause they’re universally recognised for what they are. But 3-D pedestrian crossings? While they look fantastic, how will they perform functionally? If they don’t – and (hypothetically) a pedestrian gets clobbered because a driver fails to perceive them for what they’re meant to be – who’s prepared to answer the awkward questions?”

Too right. Bullshit City: Walk this way: 3-D crossings set to dazzle (ODT)
“Crossing the road in Dunedin’s tertiary precinct will be much more fun from this week, with the installation of two 3-D pedestrian crossings in Clyde St.”

Nothing grey pavement paint can’t remove on a dark night.

The frigging murals like a hippy rash about town are bad enough. A couple of internationally-authored ones are ‘art’, but the rest count as amateur copyist dross (mostly by technically challenged locals) wrecking our unique urban vistas.

****

mural-applied-to-raw-red-brick-alley-next-to-104-bond-st-guy-mauve-at-flickr-comThanks to irresponsible building owners and ‘know-it-all-bend-the-rules’ city officials (friends of the irresponsible owners), this mural was applied to raw red brick in the side alley at 98 Bond St —contrary to the Dunedin City District Plan for listed precincts. This industrial building, a rare remnant, dates to the 1860s.
SHAME ON ALL INVOLVED.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Images: caglecartoons.com – Zebra Crossing by Marian Kamensky | flickr.com – mural at 98 Bond St by Guy Mauve

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Report from the University Landscape Trenches : Financial shoring collapsing, trouble brewing

Received from Rhodes
Mon, 24 Oct 2016 at 9:14 p.m.

Saturday’s ODT had an interesting article about delays on the troubled University of Otago landscaping project. This article is the canary in the University construction goldmine, as there are other even much larger disputes brewing on current University projects that certainly will become a goldmine for the contractors, to the detriment of the University’s financial health.

uoo-landscaping-20160508_135933Hoarding, University of Otago

Mr Mackay said the complications on the landscaping included “replacing old water, sewage and drainage pipes”. What he did not say is that this work was meant to have been done two summers ago, BEFORE the academic year, but due to the project management, it was not. However, this landscaping project is small beer, there are much bigger problems looming.

The University, in their biggest ever project, at the 11th hour, on the “advice” of a contractor, Fletcher Construction, who we understand did not even finally submit a bid, told the University they could save a few hundred thousand on the $100 million project by deleting the need for a cost control schedule…. that would have severely limited what the contractors could charge for changes and extra work. In a monumental display of incompetence, the University stopped production of the schedule – which was already underway and had to be part paid for anyway and put the drawings and specifications out to tender without a schedule. If the drawings were 100% complete and the University wasn’t to change its mind that would be OK, but the Pope is more likely to preach at Canterbury Cathedral than this happening. Of course, the drawings are woefully incomplete, and the arguments and changes have started. Watch out for Someone from the University Property Services division, in about a year, to be in full dissembling mode about the delays, and how, “even though it’s six months late, it’s still on budget”. If that is the case, the budget has massive doses of incompetency cover built into it !

An additional problem that’s about to come home to roost in the University and Otago Polytechnic’s coffers is insistence, by University Property Services, on the use of “Early Contractor Involvement” (ECI). (Someone at University Property Services has never met a new construction euphemism he did not use or a project delay that he could not justify). Both the University and Polytech on recent large projects have engaged in tender processes where there is no fixed sum, because the documents are far from complete, and the current fashion du jour is to have “early contractor involvement” where the builders are paid to be involved in the design phase, to provide “constructability” expertise. Basically the builders make a submission to say what nice people they are, and advise percentage site overhead and profit margins they would build the project for. The rest of the cost, about 85-90%, is just guesswork. (“Provisional Sums”). This process allows the “tender evaluation team” (mainly the Architect and the University) to choose who they want, without regard to price, because the weighting for “non-price attributes” is a lot more than 50% of the total weighting.

On both the University commerce building project, just started by Naylor Love, and the Polytechnic Hostel project (also won by Naylor Love), this was the process. Both projects are around $20 million all up. Significantly, the architect on both projects was Mason & Wales. There were a number of other consultants in the design teams. The politest way to put the next point is that there appeared to be “confusion” about the proposed early contractor involvement process from the team. It was thought, inexplicably, that this wonderful new system of selecting builders without worrying about price meant not only did they get to choose ones with very high margins who wouldn’t cause problems when the inevitable design problems arose, some consultants also thought that they could charge full fees and offload all of the detailing onto the builder…. which of course did not happen. Builders, in the South Island anyway, do not employ armies of CAD operators who can document bespoke large projects. That is what designers are for…. In both cases, the successful Naylor Love bid was hundreds of thousands of dollars more expensive than lower bids. Also in the case of both bids, the University and the Polytech paid a premium of around $500-600,000 to have the “ECI/ constructability” experience of Naylor Love…. only to find that the advice received was NOT what was expected…. the Polytech project has been now costed by Naylor Love and is $1.5-2.0 million over budget, and the “expert” constructability / ECI advice that the Polytech effectively paid $600,000 for is…. wait for it…. to make the building smaller. Hmmm, expensive and brief advice! Best not tell the Humanities students ! The other unsuccessful contractors may well feel aggrieved about how this process played out, as before they were even allowed to provide a proposal they had to prove their capability and experience to do the work, so in theory all tenderers were equally capable, and there was no logical reason for the favouritism to Naylor Love…. but were there other reasons ? There appears no meaningful financial oversight, the project teams seem a law unto themselves, and the suspicion is that both institutions’ funds are being spent in a very free and easy fashion.

[ends]

Related Posts and Comments:
18.7.16 Misero-mercenary at U of O
1.7.16 No one wants to work for U of O
25.9.15 University calling Property Services
28.3.15 University of Otago landscaping
24.7.13 University: Leith flood protection scheme and landscaping
31.5.13 University of Otago development plans
27.5.13 Carisbrook and Leith flood protection
17.11.10 Leith Lindsay Flood Protection Scheme
17.5.10 Campus Master Plan
28.1.10 University of Otago Campus Master Plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Finance, Media, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Travesty, University of Otago

Fire Safety at Home : Install long-life photoelectric alarms #bestprotection

Smoke-Alarms-Banner [fire.org.nz]

NEW ZEALAND FIRE SERVICE
We recommend you install long-life photoelectric type smoke alarms in your home. They may cost a little more but the benefits are significant.
• They provide a about 10 years smoke detection.
• They remove the frustration of fixing the ‘flat battery beep’ at inconvenient times such as at 3 in the morning.
• The cost of replacement batteries for standard alarms means the long-life one effectively pays for itself over its lifetime.
• You don’t have to climb ladders every year to replace batteries.

Your best protection is to have photoelectric smoke alarms in every bedroom, living area and hallway in your home. Install them in the middle of the ceiling of each room.

But, at a minimum, you should install one standard long-life photoelectric type alarm in the hallway closest to the bedrooms.

NZFS : Make Your Home and Family Fire Safe Brochure

NZFS : More on smoke alarm installation

Explanation

SMOKE ALARMS : TYPES
There are 2 main types of smoke alarm available – ionisation and photoelectric:

Ionisation alarms
Ionisation alarms monitor ions or electrically charged particles in the air. Smoke particles enter the sensing chamber changing the electrical balance of the air. The alarm will sound when the change in the electrical balance reaches a certain level.

Photoelectric alarms (recommended)
Photoelectric alarms have a sensing chamber which uses a beam of light and a light sensor. Smoke particles entering the chamber change the amount of light that reaches the sensor. The alarm sounds when the smoke density reaches a preset level.

Our recommendation for your home
We recommend that you install photoelectric smoke alarms as they provide more effective all-round detection and alarm in all types of fire scenarios and are more likely to alert occupants in time to escape safely.

█ If your home currently only has ionisation alarms installed we recommend that you also install some photoelectric alarms.

Smoke alarms for hearing-impaired
Smoke alarms are available for people with hearing loss. These alarms have extra features such as extra loud and/or lower pitch alarm sounds, flashing strobe lights, or vibrating devices.
Find out more about these alarms and where you can buy them

Australasian standards for smoke alarms
The Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC) is the representative body in the Australasian region for fire, emergency services, and land management agencies.
Read the AFAC position on smoke alarms for residential accommodation

WHERE TO BUY : Consumer Test (PDF)
Silent Death : Smoke is toxic – and breathing it can kill. So you need an alarm that gives you early warning and more time to escape.

Fire damaged property - window escape route [stuff.co.nz]Fire damage: 660 Castle St, Dunedin – window escape route [stuff.co.nz]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: fire.org.nz – smoke alarms banner

16 Comments

Filed under Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Events, Fire and Emergency NZ, Heritage, Housing, Media, New Zealand, People, Police, Property, Public interest, Site, University of Otago

Hostel project loses Ngai Tahu, ChCh rebuild strains construction sector

### ODT Online Sat, 15 Nov 2014
Iwi pulls out of project
By Vaughan Elder
Ngai Tahu has withdrawn from a project worth tens of millions to build two student hostels in Dunedin, but says it remains keen on investing elsewhere in the city. Ngai Tahu’s exit from the Otago Polytechnic project does not signal its end, with the polytechnic looking at other options to get it off the ground. The original project had involved building an up to 235-room, $20 million hall of residence on surplus Dunedin City Council land on the edge of Logan Park, with a view to building another hall on adjacent council land if the first proved successful.
Read more

Comments from another thread:

Elizabeth
February 7, 2014 at 5:36 pm

Daaave cunningly spots a deepish source of investment potential.
Mark Solomon and his board are no fools.

### ODT Online Fri, 7 Feb 2014
City-Ngai Tahu good partners
By Hamish McNeilly
The relationship between Ngai Tahu and the Dunedin City Council is “blossoming by the day”, as their respective leaders discuss regional economic development, including the benefits and risks of offshore oil and gas exploration.
Read more

Elizabeth
February 8, 2014 at 3:21 pm

Ngai Tahu investment welcome (via ODT):
8.2.14 Ngai Tahu eyes second project
22.8.13 Public consultation on $20m hostel soon
21.8.13 $20 million student hostel planned

Comments profiling Sir Marc Solomon:
https://dunedinstadium.wordpress.com/2013/12/09/unicef-nz-statement-on-child-poverty-monitor/#comment-43394 | https://dunedinstadium.wordpress.com/2013/11/30/dvml-in-disarray/#comment-43144

Related Posts and Comments:
9.6.12 City Property to compete more obviously in the market…
13.1.14 Taking to water like a duck on oil

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Media, Name, New Zealand, Ngai Tahu, Otago Polytechnic, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Tertiary larks squeeze DCC ratepayers for $30,000

“The two [Auckland] firms had been hired to prepare concept plans and options for projects to improve the pedestrian and cycling environment in and around the tertiary campuses. […] This will enable projects to be ‘picked off’ by the various institutions together or individually.” –Susan Lilley, DCC (via ODT)

● Why are DCC, university and polytechnic not buying LOCAL?
● (Student Ghetto) The streets are PUBLIC, aren’t they? Or are they.
● University and polytechnic not paying enough rates?!
● Heaps of other questions?!

Kate Wilson said Chow Hill Architects and Flow Transportation were hired to come up with a plan, at a cost of $88,000, with the city council paying $30,000, and the rest split between Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago. (ODT)

Cr Kate### ODT Online Thu, 7 Aug 2014
Auckland firms work on tertiary streetscape
By Vaughan Elder
Two Auckland firms have been hired to investigate options for a revamp of Dunedin’s tertiary precinct, which could include making some areas pedestrian only. The work on the streetscape in the tertiary precinct is being overseen by the “tertiary precinct planning group”, which includes representatives from the Dunedin City Council, Otago Polytechnic, University of Otago, Otago Regional Council, Otago Museum and Southern District Health Board.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact ratepayers…
4.8.14 Cr Wilson’s integrity ‘in tatters’
1.8.14 DCC: Sorting THE MESS
28.7.14 DCC: Residents’ Opinion Survey 2014
5.7.14 DCC’s debt level — who do you believe?
23.6.14 DCC Annual Plan 2014/15 + Rugby and Rates
2.6.14 DCC: Slip in service levels, why?!
22.5.14 DCC Transportation Planning —ANOTHER consultation disaster

1.8.14 University Partyville, North Dunedin: Put the cameras in ~!!
16.7.14 Stadium: Out of the mouths of uni babes…. #DVML
22.3.14 Dunedin North care less filthy slum
19.3.14 Dunedin North drunks
15.2.14 University of Otago: Starter questions for Harlene
10.2.14 University of Otago major sponsor for Highlanders
19.8.13 Cull on senility (firing up graduates)
31.5.13 University of Otago development plans
25.3.13 University of Otago: NEGATIVE PRESS: Weekly disorder…
20.2.12 University of Otago student orientation
17.12.11 Stadium + Cull love = University of Otago + OUSA party
23.11.11 Judge Oke Blaikie finally said it
20.5.10 Hahaha if you’re still thinking Campus Master Plans look…
17.5.10 Campus Master Plan

North Dunedin - Where Campus Watch are operating [otago.ac.nz] 1North Dunedin – Where Campus Watch are operating [otago.ac.nz]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Cr Kate by whatifdunedin

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Dunedin North care less filthy slum

—– Original Message —–
From: Jeff Dickie
To: Elizabeth Kerr
Sent: Friday, March 21, 2014 5:45 PM
Subject: Sunday in the slums of North Dunedin

Hi Elizabeth, your comments re the new hotel [“Cull’s Cockup”, the new “Farry’s Folly”] are very good and congratulations on the National Radio coverage.

In the next day or so I’d like to post something on your Whatif site regarding the implications of the DCC neglecting core business and services. We’ve watched as the North End has transformed from an integrated community combining residents and students to an intensely populated and filthy slum. Largely as a result of poor planning by the DCC and University. I took these photos on Sunday, 16 March.

While Dave preens himself in front of the mirror and is distracted by the latest snake oil salesmen, there are some very serious social issues developing.

Regards, Jeff

George Street
Jeff Dickie DSC05341 (2)Jeff Dickie DSC05340 (2)

Castle Street
Jeff Dickie DSC05342 (2)

Jeff Dickie DSC05344 (2)

JeffDickie DSC05377 (2)Jeff Dickie DSC05343 (2)Jeff Dickie DSC05378 (2)

Jeff Dickie DSC05376 (2)Jeff Dickie DSC05375 (3)

Related Post and Comments:
19.3.14 Dunedin North drunks
15.2.14 University of Otago: Starter questions for Harlene
10.2.14 University of Otago major sponsor for Highlanders
25.3.13 University of Otago: NEGATIVE PRESS: Weekly disorder…
20.2.12 University of Otago student orientation
17.12.11 Stadium + Cull love = University of Otago + OUSA party
23.11.11 Judge Oke Blaikie finally said it

For more, enter *university* or *campus* in the search box at right.

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Filed under Architecture, Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Highlanders, Media, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design

Dunedin North drunks

Mr Gable stressed not all the partygoers exhibited bad behaviour, with others trying to calm the more aggressive young men.

### ODT Online Wed, 19 Mar 2014
Man attacked by St Patrick’s revellers
By Hamish McNeilly
A Dunedin man says he had his shirt ripped, glasses pulled off his face and his car’s wing mirror yanked off after he confronted drunken St Patrick’s Day revellers who were urinating on his property. Walking from work to his Malvern St home, Chris Gable encountered a large crowd of green-clad revellers in the area of the former Woodhaugh Hotel, about 5pm on Monday. […] He later had to leave the property, and while he was away, his neighbour, Jeff Dickie found an estimated 40 people on Mr Gable’s section, including some bouncing on his trampoline and others urinating on his property.
Read more

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Figures released under the Official Information Act show the Fire Service recorded 586 nuisance fires in the North Dunedin student area between February 20, 2009, and February 20, 2014. Of those, 179 were recorded last year – compared with 77 in 2009.

### ODT Online Wed, 19 Mar 2014
Student fires dampened
By Hamish McNeilly
Nuisance fires in the student quarter hit a five-year high last year, with Castle St the area’s top hot spot. To dampen fire threats, the Fire Service, police, University of Otago and Dunedin City Council have taken a zero tolerance approach to such fires in the city. Fire Service East Otago area manager Laurence Voight said that approach, coupled with fire prevention activities during Orientation Week appeared to have ”reduced the unwanted behaviour”.
Read more

Meanwhile Vice-chancellor Harlene Hayne, on advice received from the likes of Stuart McLauchlan and John Ward (did we mention Mayor Cull?), ‘decides’ the University of Otago should sponsor, yes, the ‘drinking culture’ that attends a professional but barely coherent and losing rugby team, The Highlanders. Some things are cumulative by fragile branding connection… a marketing marriage borne in heaven: A GREAT EXAMPLE TO ALL. This, a ‘subtle’ buttering device, before the DCC’s Stadium gets offloaded to the University for nothing, and Hail Mary/Harlene! the University doesn’t have to pay rates.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

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