Tag Archives: Taieri

Dunedin’s industrial land

Alistair Broad – is he having a meltdown, or what?

Why is freehold baron Earl Hagaman not mentioned in this story?

[why is DCC’s treatment of the Caledonian leaseholders vaguely referenced, not by name… ugliness alert]

Oh dear, moths flying around the noble art of leaseholding as it may hold back development – what do they want? For Port Otago Ltd and Otago Regional Council to relinquish their power and wealth? Why should they?

What have Hilary Calvert and investor friends got to do with all this? The plot thickens.

Has this really anything to do with city councillors, EMT and the City Development Team (including the shattered urban design team) using “friends” to arbitrate change in the property sector. District plan and spatial plan objectives to be met for (cough) economic development?

### ODT Online Thu, 12 Jun 2014
Businessman slams leasehold ‘parasite’
By Shawn McAvinue
Leasehold land is a ”parasite” killing development in Dunedin, property owner and businessmen Alistair Broad says. Mr Broad, of Dunedin, says property developers are reluctant to invest in Dunedin because of the large amount of leasehold land.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC promotes Riccarton Rd as sole heavy traffic bypass

█ City council and spooks menace Riccarton Rd property owners
█ Conflicted Mosgiel-Taieri community board pushes agendas
█ What’s really going on ????

Former Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board member Brian Miller, a resident of Riccarton Rd, is one of four landowners along the stretch who have declined to sell part of their land to the council for the project.

### ODT Online Wed, 23 Apr 2014
Get road fixed – board
By Debbie Porteous
The Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board has again urged the Dunedin City Council to get on with improving Riccarton Rd, saying it is even more of a priority now the council has agreed to allow 50-tonne trucks on local roads. The board made the plea in its submission to the Dunedin City Council on its 2014-15 draft annual plan. […] The council plans to widen and strengthen Riccarton Rd to improve its safety, and is working through land purchases to that end.
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Trucks hpmv-H-sticker [nzta.govt.nz] 150MAX vehicle carrier with HPMV H-sticker (NZTA)

NZTA | 50MAX
Updated: 15 April 2014
50MAX is a new generation of truck that allows for safe and more efficient transport of freight goods.
50MAX vehicle combinations have one more axle than conventional 44 tonne vehicles combinations, meaning the overall truck load is spread further and there is no additional wear on roads per tonne of freight.
50MAX gives operators an option to carry increased payloads on parts of the network that, while economically important to New Zealand, carry lower volumes of freight. The increased payloads of 50MAX can lead to economic benefits for producers, customers and our communities.

The New Zealand Transport Agency is now accepting 50MAX permit applications for State Highways in the North Island and South Island, as well as a steadily increasing number of roads delegated by local authorities.
50MAX permits for other local roads will be rolled out as they become available (in the meantime, 50MAX operators can apply for higher mass HPMV route permits from local authorities).
Read more + 50MAX vehicle designs

On the road
● Trucks will be permitted to carry loads of up to 53 tonnes on specified routes.
● Some types of trucks, including logging rigs and vehicle carriers, will be allowed to extend to 22m “as of right” instead of by permits.
● Some buses will be allowed to be 13.5m long – up from 12.6m now.
● Farm machinery will be allowed on roads at all hours, as long as it occupies no more than one lane.

Trucks 50MAX 23m logging combination [nzta.govt.nz] 150MAX 23m logging combination [NZTA] (click to enlarge)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DScene, staying power . . .

DScene 8-5-13 (screenshot detail) 1[screenshot]

THE CONUNDRUM
DScene could fall victim to the disease rabidly attacking the Fairfax Media conglomerate. How to deal with the local monopoly, should the war have been fought online, not on paper.

### ODT Online Fri, 10 May 2013
D-Scene newspaper may close
Dunedin community newspaper D-Scene may be ceasing publication after five years. The Fairfax Media-owned The Press reported yesterday a proposal to close the weekly publication, a subsidiary of The Southland Times.
Read more

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### 3news.co.nz Fri, 10 May 2013 11:03a.m.
Dunedin’s D-Scene paper tipped to close
By Thomas Mead, Online Reporter
Fairfax Media is considering ending the popular Dunedin community newspaper D-Scene, putting eight jobs at risk. The media conglomerate has put a proposal to staff and is now deciding the fate of the weekly publication in a two-week consultation period with those affected. Southland Times general manager Sue Gregory is declining to comment until the consultation period is over, but confirmed the initiative was underway. D-Scene was purchased by Fairfax Media in September 2008, but is in a competitive environment, up against the well-read Otago Daily Times and weekly The Star.
3news Link

[This too, gives pause . . .]

### NZ Herald Online 5:30 AM Friday May 3, 2013
John Drinnan: Local history shipped out
History has a price and New Zealand’s photographic history is being shipped to Little Rock, Arkansas. Veteran sports photographer Peter Bush is shocked by Fairfax Media’s decision to sell its newspaper photo archive to an American firm. Fairfax has told Auckland staff it will be shipping photo archives for most of its Australian and New Zealand newspapers to the Rogers Photo Archive, a company based in Little Rock. The company will send back digital versions of the photos, but will keep the original prints, including photos of Sir Edmund Hillary.
Read more

[2008, remember the Smiths back then . . .]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 13:59 09/09/2008
Fairfax buying Dunedin community paper D-Scene
Dunedin community newspaper D-Scene looks set to join the Fairfax stable with the media giant announcing it is in the final stages of buying it. A spin-off from Queenstown’s Mountain Scene, the paper was set up earlier this year in a market dominated by long-time incumbent, the Otago Daily Times.
Read more

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### nbr.co.nz Tuesday September 09, 2008
Fairfax buys a lemon
By Mitchell Hall
Fairfax media’s decision to buy Dunedin’s struggling free weekly newspaper D Scene has one competitor sniffing that there’s no business case for the purchase – given how much money it is said to have been losing. The Otago Daily Times is the oldest newspaper in the country – and one of the last independent newspapers not owned by APN or Fairfax. The ODT’s business manager (and Allied Press director), Nick Smith, says a large editorial team designed D Scene with the Otago Daily Times in their sights. “The Otago Daily Times was seen (by them) to be an old and staid paper circulating in a one horse town. “They decided that the ODT was something that – according to their sales people – was a relic from the past, and they were smart boys who’d done all this research and they can take the town over.”
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Fresh veggies, a holiday mystery

As many will know, I take a keen interest in who deals in fresh market produce around the city.

Years ago, a tiny group of us set up Otago Farmers Market at Dunedin Railway Station (opened March 2003) to ensure local market gardeners and food producers had at least a fighting chance to survive against the duopoly supermarkets trucking in old (no longer fresh) fruit and vegetables from the North Island; and to provide a market alternative to export given the high compliance costs besetting small orchards.

Otago Farmers Market logo download(1)We aimed to get the city’s ‘urbanistas’ to talk to Otago’s rural folk by adopting a Saturday market ritual – prior to opening we researched our business model to death (given the exact nature of Dunedin food retailing and the customer base, and the availability of suitable vendors) in the attempt to keep overheads down so small local producers could make the real profits. And that is what happened.

The farmers market has spawned new businesses and new employment. We always envisioned the market as a business incubator. We also hoped our hard work – in just a couple of years it became a multimillion dollar enterprise (for the vendors) – would eventually spur other small independent farmers markets to set up in the region to give vendors more chances of selling – and so they have, with varying degrees of success and failure.

While we know Otago Farmers Market has the numbers, the solid customer base at Dunedin – there is absolutely no room for organiser complacency. Some of that, I believe, and a lack of strategic business thinking, timing and network connections on the part of the organisers was responsible for the failure of the trial market venue in South Dunedin. They may have misread the location as much as the trading climate, more diligence was required.

At the Railway Station we saw every trick in the book committed by vendors (not the majority of vendors, I note) to earn cash by means not covered in the vendor contract they sign. That is the nature of a cash economy, the cowboys and cowgirls try it on. Behind scenes, we met mid-week with our accountant to look over business and enforce contracts, measuring these against what happened on site on Saturdays – we attended all Saturday markets checking the ‘pump’ as well as greeting customers at the gate, year in year out, rain hail or shine. Were we over-possessive? – No. We were learning the whole dynamic, firming systems for the avoidance of kinks. A farmers market will never be perfect, but it has to try!

Those who now run Otago Farmers Market continue to be vigilant – the need to focus on quality control was never more relevant – this is what we the initiators and founding trustees set great store by (to use a phrase), we rigorously policed things as the market evolved. When we each handed over to new management on pursuit of other projects about town we expected our long-view objectives to be followed and maintained as best business practice.

http://www.otagofarmersmarket.org.nz/

I called into Veggie Boys in Albany Street before Christmas, it’s near where I live, fresh flowers posed at the door for sale is a bonanza for the apartment dweller. The ‘boys’ Barry Gazeley and Marty Hay opened a store in Cumberland St in late 2011; their Albany St store opened in July 2012. They claim they’re meeting a gap in the market for locally grown produce (Otago Southland). Good on them I thought, after reading this profile: Dream comes true for Veggie Boys (ODT 26.4.12).

Google tells me Anderson & Co Resource Management has worked on planning matters for Veggie Boys.

http://www.facebook.com/veggieboys

After much delay I finally got out to Wal’s Plant Land at Mosgiel, run by Clive Wallis, to check into the new Topiary Cafe there. We’ve been great fans of Richard and Michelle Denhardt’s last venture, ‘No. 8 Cafe w Herbs’ at Outram (now closed); the two of us were keen to sample their food and coffee, again.

We spent a pleasant couple of hours at Wal’s, and had a good look around the site – it’s a really nice place to visit. There were couples and families about. We were surprised to see a new Veggie Boys outlet. Their third outlet? They must be doing well. We made some plant purchases, and left feeling very pleased with ourselves.

When we got back to town I was a bit curious. Towards the end of last year I was in and out of DCC’s online consents records following progress on Outram subdivisions and what not, I hadn’t noticed an application for Veggie Boys (109 Bush Road). Anything commercial in the rural zone sparks my interest, being a country girl averse to life-stylers carving up the countryside. Bane of the earth!

Anyway, I checked non-notified decisions, public notices and notified decisions. I might’ve missed something, I couldn’t find a resource consent for Veggie Boys to trade from Wal’s site.

I’m mystified – when I think about it, given all the activities going on at Wal’s, and what I can’t see on the council record, online at least, there appears to be more to look into consents-wise. I don’t know if anyone else has noticed. Maybe council staff have overlooked loading up the website. I’ll have to check the paperwork at City Planning when I get time.

Nurseryman turns dreams into reality (ODT 3.11.12)
Veggie Boys profile picture

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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What’s Syd really up to at DCC, given the history, forgetting Cull

Haha, Syd’s preaching there’s a lot in it for Dunedin if offshore drilling for oil and gas proceeds. We would say, matter-of-factly, only a minor few businessmen will ‘profiteer’, the rest of us won’t see a cent, ever. He’s a simple guy. It’s more about who he knows and how he can be used by them. He’s THE ONE to force out of Council in 2013, IF he decides to stand again. His age is working against him plus he’s got the Taieri subdivisions to keep him busy. Dependably, the mob will find someone to fill his boots. Like nothing happened.

[However, What if? troops, fact-finding has never been so much fun.]

Cr Syd Brown, chairman of the Dunedin City Council’s finance, strategy and development committee, said it did not matter when drilling occurred, and the “real positive” was Dunedin remained on the company’s radar. “It’s really a matter of when it does happen that we make every post a winner, so that that opportunity can be spread over the economy of Dunedin.”

### ODT Online Thu, 2 Aug 2012
Oil drilling off Oamaru postponed
By Chris Morris and Simon Hartley
Dunedin remains in the running to become an oil base, despite the decision by oil giant Anadarko Petroleum to delay bringing a drilling rig into southern waters, a Dunedin city councillor says. It was confirmed yesterday Anadarko had deferred bringing a rig to the Canterbury Basin, offshore from Oamaru, until the summer of 2013. The company had planned to start drilling off the coasts of Raglan, Canterbury and Otago last summer, but that was delayed to October this year because of a global shortage of rigs. Yesterday’s news of a further delay prompted mixed reactions in Dunedin, which could benefit from becoming an oil base if drilling proceeded.
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28.7.12 Pokie fraud: ODT fails to notice own backyard

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Who was it — Malcolm Farry? Peter Brown?…

Or the previous property manager, whose staff member had a husband that….

### ODT Online Fri, 4 May 2012
DCC seeking buyer for Taieri land
By Allison Rudd
The Dunedin City Council is trying to sell a 4ha parcel of vacant industrial land it owns on the Taieri Plain. The Dukes Rd land had been on the market for some time but had been freshly advertised and its sale was now being “aggressively pushed”, council property manager Robert Clark said yesterday. It is up for tender, along with an adjoining privately owned parcel of industrial land of 15.6ha.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Industrial land – Taieri, Dunedin

“We had a shortage of industrial land in the city. The Taieri land might not be developed yet but we need to take a very long-term perspective on its development.” –John Christie, Chamber of Commerce

### ODT Online Sat, 21 May 2011
Industrial zoning fails to sell Taieri sections
By Allison Rudd
When the Dunedin City Council announced plans to rezone 52ha of land on the Taieri Plain from rural to industrial, it trumpeted the Taieri as a location which would attract new businesses to the city and allow existing companies to expand. Nine years on, almost all the land remains undeveloped, populated by livestock rather than people.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Inanity of property development and consumer demand at scale – less than subtle reminder to DCC, we HATE sprawl

### boston.com September 30, 2010
The Big Picture: News Stories in Pictures
Human landscapes in SW Florida
By Alan Taylor
Boom and bust residential development has drastically affected parts of southwest Florida for decades now, and I spent some time (with the help of Google Earth), looking around the area. With permission from the fine folks at Google, here are a few glimpses at development in southwest Florida.
Link + Comments (26 photos total)

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### distractedscientist.wordpress.com October 16, 2010
By distractedscientist
Why primary school children shouldn’t do town planning.
It seems that fairly large tracts of Florida make for some amazing art, but it’s not town planning. More like doodling with patterns, and being, ‘Oh, that could be be a town layout’.
Read more

Other photos

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Links via @ajamesgreen

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