Tag Archives: Survey

Draft bylaw and ADVERSE EFFECTS of freedom camping at Dunedin parks and reserves will be Consulted

FREEDOM CAMPING IS YOUR COUNCIL DELIBERATELY SETTING ITSELF UP TO COMPETE WITH COMMERCIAL CAMPSITE PROVIDERS

WHAT BENEFITS – THERE ARE NONE

We take it Mr Mayor does not live next door to a freedom camping site and does not lease out the council owned Santa Fe on his driveway to roofless young strangers with bad toilet and littering habits passing through the peninsula area.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Community’s views to be sought on freedom camping

This item was published on 09 Jun 2017

The Dunedin City Council will seek the community’s views on issues related to freedom camping, says Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull. Council discussion on a report to its 30 May 2017 meeting which recommended public consultation to amend the current Camping Control Bylaw, was delayed pending information from a national freedom camping forum and new guidelines on self-contained vehicles. The proposed bylaw amendments were to allow for further sites to be considered for vehicles that are not self-contained. Mr Cull says that given the wide range of views expressed both formally and informally by the community and Community Board members in relation to the report, and on wider issues related to freedom camping over the last season, it was appropriate to revisit the DCC’s approach.

“Freedom camping is an extremely complex issue which draws impassioned comments from both sides of the debate. It is therefore appropriate to take this opportunity to formally engage with the public on the wider issues around freedom camping; looking at all the pros and cons, costs and benefits.”

A staff report would be presented to the 27 June Council meeting recommending a special consultative process on whether the current bylaw should be amended to restrict freedom camping to certified self-contained vehicles only, or whether it should continue to make provisions for vehicles not certified as self-contained and look at adding a range of further sites where these vehicles could be accommodated.

Mr Cull says the DCC’s current Camping Control Bylaw adopted in 2015 is a very good bylaw.

“At a national level it is regarded as a best practice bylaw by the National Responsible Camping Forum. However, overcrowding has been a major issue at the two unrestricted sites at Warrington and Ocean View, resulting in widespread concern in the community. We therefore need to understand from the community whether, firstly, they think the city should continue to make provisions for non self-contained freedom campers at all, and, if so, at what other sites around the city could these types of freedom campers be accommodated to ease the pressure at Warrington and Ocean View.”

Subject to Council approval on 27 June, staff would complete the public consultation, including hearings if required, and then report back to Council prior to the start of the 2017/18 camping season with a recommendation for further consideration. The current Bylaw will remain in force until that process is completed.

Contact DCC on 03 477 4000. DCC Link

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### ODT Online Sat, 10 Jun 2017
Petition against freedom camping proposal
By David Loughrey
Residents living beside Rotary Park in Dunedin are the latest up in arms over a council proposal to provide three new freedom camping sites. The residents say the park could be “taken away from the locals”, and become the realm of freedom campers instead of local children. They have also raised concerns about noise from campers parking close to their homes, and potential damage to reservoirs, a pumping station, and telecommunications equipment at the park. In response to opposition to proposed camps at Rotary Park, Puddle Alley, near Invermay on the Taieri, and outside the Brighton Surf Life Saving Club, Mayor Dave Cull yesterday promised to consult the public before the council made any decisions. […] Waverley resident Sharon Weir said a meeting was held on Wednesday night with about 15 residents, and a petition to oppose the proposal had been started.
Read more

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The only reason “Overcrowding had been a major issue at Warrington and Ocean View, resulting in widespread concern.” is because the Dunedin City Council decided to NOT manage the Warrington Domain. This to take away problems from ‘metropolitan’ areas.

DISGUSTING COUNCIL TREATMENT OF RURAL COMMUNITIES AND THEIR PUBLIC GREEN SPACE.

Warrington residents have had to deal with this:

Wrecked, the state of the domain after the camping season closed:

A Warrington resident worked out that, in the season, Dunedin Ratepayers had been subsidising the roughly 85–100+ freedom campers at the Domain each night at $10 per head.

CONSIDER A BAN ON FREEDOM CAMPING AT DUNEDIN

Related Post and Comments:
● 9.6.17 Council says “bag it” —we can help with that
● 30.5.17 The Boil Over : DCC and Freedom Camping, Reserves and Beaches bylaws
● 13.5.17 Condition of Warrington Domain screwed by DCC lack of enforcement #CampingControlBylaw23
● 1.2.17 “Fake news” from DCC boffins & Community Board re freedom camping at Warrington Domain #TheBlight

█ For more, enter the terms *warrington* and *freedom camping* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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The Boil Over : DCC and Freedom Camping, Reserves and Beaches bylaws

At Facebook:

### ODT Online Tue, 30 May 2017
Freedom camping overflows
By David Loughrey
Three new freedom-camping sites are proposed for Dunedin, as the two already provided by the Dunedin City Council have reached capacity. Sites at Rotary Park in Highcliff, a reserve at Puddle Alley near Invermay on the Taieri, and outside the Brighton Surf Lifesaving Club has been put forward as proposed in a report to a council meeting today. The idea has already run into opposition from the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board, which says the council should not spend money on non-self-contained freedom camping. The explosion of freedom-camping tourism in New Zealand has caused tension as locals deal with overrun campsites, litter and human waste. Sites at Ocean View, and in particular Warrington, have sparked complaints from some residents, while others have been supportive of the visitors. The report said there was an increase of 37% in vehicles using the Warrington site during February and March this year, compared with the year before. There were 157 vehicles there at Waitangi weekend.
Read more

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There was a full meeting of the Dunedin City Council held today, preceded by a Public Forum.

[follow business at the DCC video when published at YouTube]

View the Agenda at: https://infocouncil.dunedin.govt.nz/RedirectToDoc.aspx?URL=Open/2017/05/CNL_20170530_AGN_539_AT_WEB.htm

Items to note:

2.3  Public Forum – Freedom Camping
Rhys Owen wishes to address the meeting concerning freedom camping.

2.4  Public Forum – Freedom Camping
Geraldine Tait, Waikouaiti Coast Community Board wishes to address the meeting concerning Freedom Camping.

Reports:

13. Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017
Recommendation    Minute   
Bylaw Hearings Recommendations
Implementation Plan
Beach Access Points for Horses and Boats
Ecologically Sensitve Beach and Reserve Areas
Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017

14. Review of Camping Control Bylaw 2015
Recommendation    Minute   
Survey Results
Warrington Map
Sites Identified by Community Board and Staff
Potential New Sites
Draft Camping Control Bylaw amendments
Statement of Proposal

At 14. above, I have linked to the freedom camping survey results requested MONTHS AGO via LGOIMA, from the scrubbers who guarded them from our ‘prying eyes’ – the results are pretty much illegible to the naked eye (nearly the smallest font size possible) but use your onscreen magnifier. Good grief pull your socks up, people: “Communicate clearly!”

At Channel 39 tonight, news presenter Craig Storey said issues with the DCC’s proposed three new freedom-camping sites reached boiling point at the Council meeting.

See tomorrow’s Otago Daily Times for more.

ODTtv June 7 2016
Someone in the video isn’t coping with the notion of freedom camping, and this was before things got really out of control at Warrington Domain over summer 2016/17 when the irresponsible DCC decided it would not enforce its camping control bylaw 23.

[btw….how delightful that the Green Party’s list has FEW Southern candidates – think on that DCC followers lol]

Related Posts and Comments:
● 13.5.17 Condition of Warrington Domain screwed by DCC lack of enforcement #CampingControlBylaw23
● 9.4.17 DCC obfuscates : Open slather for freedom campers at Warrington
● 16.3.17 WE have the information, unreasonable delay providing it #LGOIMA
● 15.2.17 Warrington : DCC dictates loss of community’s grassed recreation reserve to freeloaders
8.2.17 Hands Off Enjoyment of OUR Beaches #DCC
● 6.2.17 Uncontrolled freedom camping at Warrington Domain this weekend —DCC ‘hell model’ [no enforcement]
● 1.2.17 “Fake news” from DCC boffins & Community Board re freedom camping at Warrington Domain #TheBlight
10.2.16 Dunedin freedom camping #DCC #enforcement
16.12.14 DCC: Freedom Camping issues
7.12.09 Coastal protection zones

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Filed under DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Freedom camping, Geography, Health & Safety, Infrastructure, Media, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Perversion, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, Urban design, What stadium

DCC 2GP (district plan): Residential parking + Medium density housing

A flyer received this week at Pitt St…. (the photo is lower Scotland St)

DCC residential parking survey flyer Oct 2014

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Surveying Views on Parking

This item was published on 21 Oct 2014

The Dunedin City Council wants to hear what the public thinks about possible changes to how parking is managed in areas close to the CBD. Areas include City Rise, residential streets near the campus, the Warehouse Precinct, and around Lower Princes Street, Smith Street, York Place and Harrow Street.

Under a review of Dunedin’s District Plan, the DCC is looking at whether the number of off-street car parks required for dwellings in these areas should be reduced. “While this would make more space available for inner city living and could improve neighbourhood amenity, it would also mean more demand for on-street parking,” says City Development Manager Anna Johnson. “To manage this, the DCC may make changes to how parking is managed, with more on-street car parks in the affected areas being reserved for residents with permits or for visitors parking for up to two hours. This would mean that fewer on-street parks would be available to commuters,” says Ms Johnson.

Before any decisions on these matters are made, an online survey will query what the general public, affected residents, commuters, developers, businesses, schools, and other affected organisations think. Survey results will then be used by the DCC to help decide how parking in the affected areas should be managed. If any changes are proposed to District Plan rules for off-street parking, people will be able to make submissions on these changes next year, when the reviewed District Plan is notified. Any changes to these rules would not be likely to come into force until 2016.

In most of the affected areas, changes to on-street parking would only be proposed after the changes to District Plan off-street parking rules had taken place. However, where on-street parking pressure is already particularly high changes may be considered earlier. This could include, for example, areas around Royal Terrace, Heriot Row, London St and Cargill St and parts of City Rise, such as around Arthur Street. If any changes to on-street parking are proposed there will be formal consultation and people will be able to make submissions on the proposals.

█ Online surveys will be available from Wednesday 22 October to Friday 7 November from http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp and paper surveys are available on request from the DCC. Please call 03 477 4000 to request a hard copy to be sent in the post.

Contact Anna Johnson – City Development Manager on 03 474 3874.

DCC Link

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Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Medium Density Housing Zones Identified

This item was published on 21 Oct 2014

The growth in one to two person households in Dunedin has prompted a rethink of how we look at residential development. As part of the development of the Dunedin Spatial Plan and the city’s second generation District Plan (2GP), Dunedin City Council staff have been working with stakeholders and experts, and consulting with the community, to identify areas that should provide for medium density housing, particularly in areas close to centres, public transport, and community and recreational facilities.

Medium density relates to how many residential units there are per section. Medium density housing can be in the form of houses on small sections, semi-detached or terraced houses, or two to three storey apartment buildings on larger sections. Much of South Dunedin and the residential areas around the University of Otago are examples of areas that are developed to a “medium density” level.

DCC City Development Manager Anna Johnson says various ideas about where to provide medium density housing have been tested through different stages of consultation. As a result of that feedback and further field work, a final set of areas to be included in the 2GP, to be notified in the first half of next year, has been proposed.

Many of these areas are already zoned for, or developed as, medium density housing, but some new areas have been identified to cater for a predicted growth in demand for different housing types. From this week, owners and occupiers in areas of medium density zoning will be given a chance to see what is proposed in these areas and to provide feedback on the key draft Plan provisions.

Ms Johnson says the need to identify such areas reflects Dunedin’s changing demographics. “The city’s largest demographic growth area is one to two person households, which includes couples with no children at home. These so-called empty nesters often want to make a move to warm, low maintenance forms of housing in their existing neighbourhoods. We need to ensure the city’s planning rules have scope to do that.”

The proposed medium density zones would require a minimum site size of 200m2 for subdivision. In terms of existing sites and newly-subdivided sites, 45m2 of land would be required for each ‘habitable room’, which equates to a room that is, or could be, a bedroom. Providing all performance standards related to the building were met, this would allow, for example, a four bedroom house, or two semi-detached residential units with two bedrooms each, to be built on a 200m2 site.

Research by DCC planning staff and public submissions on the 2GP point to the need for medium density housing in areas where there is good access to public transport, community facilities and green spaces. There are 23 areas that have been identified for medium density zoning. Five of these may need infrastructure upgrades if significantly more development occurred. The 23 areas include areas that are already zoned medium density, areas where development is at a higher level than is currently permitted and areas that might benefit from redevelopment to improve the range and quality of housing available. It also includes areas where there is a market for more housing choices, where some change in housing types can occur without a major impact on existing amenity values.

Neighbourhoods already zoned for medium density (residential 2, 3 and 4) include areas below the Town Belt, around the University campus and parts of Caversham and Mosgiel. Areas where there is already quite a lot of medium density housing include parts of Mornington, City Rise, the Gardens area and North East Valley. In some suburbs, such as Opoho, Roslyn, Belleknowes, Andersons Bay, Waverley and parts of Caversham, residential 1 zoning currently restricts building to a minimum 500m2 site, but there is a market for more housing choices.

“We believe medium density housing could be provided for, with appropriate design standards, in areas like these without significant impact on the amenity values of the area,” Ms Johnson says. “Ultimately we want to spread the options for medium density housing across the city and not just be focusing on older areas that may be perceived as less desirable. We want people to have choices as they get older. Not everyone who wants to live in an apartment or low maintenance home wants to live in the central city. People want choices in their own neighbourhoods and there is a growing demand for quality smaller homes in our popular suburbs.”

In addition to the medium density housing zones, a further eight areas are proposed to be zoned as heritage residential zones, but with density and plan provisions similar to those for medium density zones.

█ From Wednesday, visit http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp for more details and to fill out a survey on medium density housing. Consultation closes on Friday, 7 November.

Contact Anna Johnson – City Development Manager on 03 474 3874.

DCC Link

● ODT 24.10.14 Plan changes target housing, parking

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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ORC: City bus services, submissions

Buses, Dunedin [radionz.co.nz]

“Heart-wrenching” tales of parents walking with young children from Corstorphine to Dunedin Hospital or walking up steep hills carrying bags of groceries while buses zoomed past…

### ODT Online Fri, 12 Sep 2014
Call for cheaper bus fares
By Rebecca Fox
Calls for public transport to be more affordable and accessible for the “walking poor” dominated yesterday’s public transport hearing. “Heart-wrenching” tales of parents walking with young children from Corstorphine to Dunedin Hospital or walking up steep hills carrying bags of groceries while buses zoomed past were made to the panel of regional councillors Sam Neill (chairman) and Michael Deaker, along with Dunedin city councillor Aaron Hawkins, as they sat through the second day of public submissions on the draft regional public transport plan. About 330 people and organisations made submissions to the draft plan that contains sweeping changes, expected to lead to faster and more direct routes away from smaller residential streets.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
28.5.14 Otago Regional Council: Buses —Journey Planner (now online)
10.4.14 Otago Regional Council + Dunedin buses
27.12.13 Otago Heritage Bus shines !!! —ORC holiday bus suspension…
24.11.11 Dunedin buses: ORC or DCC
29.11.10 Phillip Cole on Dunedin buses

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: radionz.co.nz – Dunedin buses, George Street

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Otago Regional Council + Dunedin buses

“We want to gauge the degree to which the community understand our role and how well they rate the services we deliver.” –Peter Bodeker

### ODT Online Thu, 10 Apr 2014
ORC to survey public
A phone and internet survey is to be undertaken to find out how much people know about the Otago Regional Council. A telephone survey of 900 people by Tauranga-based Key Research Group this month will be complemented by one on the council’s website. Council chief executive Peter Bodeker said the survey was the first of its kind for the council, which in the past had only surveyed its resource consent survey applicants.
Read more

www.orc.govt.nz

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### ODT Online Thu, 10 Apr 2014
Hawkins reveals ORC discussing city buses
By Chris Morris
The Otago Regional Council appears set to consider handing responsibility for Dunedin’s public transport network to the Dunedin City Council. However, ORC chairman Stephen Woodhead fired a shot across the bow of Dunedin’s City councillor Aaron Hawkins for prematurely revealing the move yesterday. Cr Hawkins, in a message posted on Facebook, announced the ORC would meet next Wednesday to consider ”a proposal to formally offer governance of public transport to the Dunedin City Council”.
Read more

Dunedin buses [buswatchnz.blogspot.co.nz]Can DCC afford to take on loss-making bus services?

Related Posts and Comments:
24.11.11 Dunedin buses: ORC or DCC
29.11.10 Phillip Cole on Dunedin buses

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

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2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey: DCC spooks massage Cull, for sheep

WTF In farmer parlance, does anyone tell sheep or spooks that ‘a mayor’ doesn’t set the direction for Dunedin? It’s your councillors who set it (with council bureaucrats and steakholders rammed up rear passages), blame them. Honestly!

### ch9.co.nz October 8, 2012 – 5:57pm
Dunedin residents satisfied with city, concerned about economy
Dunedin residents say they are satisfied with their city, but increasingly concerned about the economy. That finding is from the results of the latest DCC residents’ opinion survey, which were released today. And despite some financial gloom, there is plenty to keep Mayor Dave Cull happy with the path he is on.
Video

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Dunedin City Council
Media Release

2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey

This item was published on 08 Oct 2012.

The Dunedin City Council has been running an annual Residents’ Opinion Survey since 1994. The 2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey (the Survey) is designed to measure residents’ satisfaction with the services and facilities the Council is involved with and with Dunedin itself. The Council uses the results of the Survey to assess the extent to which it is has met (or is progressing towards meeting) its Annual Plan and Community Plan objectives.

The Residents’ Opinion Survey Summary Points, Report and Results are attached as PDF Documents.

Contact Dunedin City Council on 477 4000.

2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey: Summary Points (PDF, 62.5 KB)
This document was presented to the media as a summary

2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey: Report (PDF, 2.2 MB)
This Document is the full report for the survey

2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey: Results (PDF, 1.1 MB)
This document is a summary of results of the survey

DCC Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Not happy UNTIL . . . #ROS 2011

The Dunedin City Council books have been fully opened for forensic audit and independent investigations of conflicts of interest, governance decisions, council-owned companies, and more have been completed.

One area where satisfaction levels were not improving was respondents’ perception of Dunedin as a thriving city; only 29% agreed it was, the same as last year, but down from 50% in 2006.

### ODT Online Fri, 15 Jul 2011
Residents happier with DCC
By David Loughrey
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull was wearing a satisfied smile yesterday, following the release of a residents’ opinion survey that showed a sharp increase in public satisfaction with his council. Acting chief executive Athol Stephens was also basking in the glow of a result that showed 63% of residents were satisfied with his staff, up 11% from last year. […] Satisfaction with the overall performance of the council increased significantly, with 46% of respondents satisfied with their council, and 17% dissatisfied, compared with 35% and 38% last year.
Read more

Related Post:
25.4.11 Oh wait, you mean…

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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