Tag Archives: Street lighting

Dunedin: Randoms from inside warehouse precinct 18.10.14

Photographs taken at the Vogel St. Street Party (public tours) held on Saturday, 18 October. [click to enlarge]

Jetty St overbridge with McIndoes, ADI, Jade and Reed’s buildings
Vogel 21 IMG_5165Vogel 20 IMG_5168

View from Stavely Building rooftop across NMA Building to Holcim on Fryatt St
Vogel 28a IMG_5155

Bond St apartments and mixed useVogel 23 IMG_5155

Former Chief Post Office bronze-framed windows
Vogel 22 IMG_5155

Stavely Building, cnr Bond and Jetty Sts, apartments with shared atrium
vogel-17b1-quick-render-img_5194 (2)Vogel 16 IMG_5202

Reed’s Building (former Otago Education Board offices), 75 Crawford St
Vogel 15 IMG_5212Vogel 24 IMG_5155Vogel 14 IMG_5215

Street art cnr Princes and Jetty Sts by Pixel Pancho (ITA)
Vogel 31 IMG_5155Vogel 32 IMG_5155Vogel 33 IMG_5155

Agricultural Hall and Sammy’s (former His Majesty’s Theatre), Crawford St
Vogel 25 IMG_5155Vogel 26 IMG_5155

Street art, DCC carpark in Water St
Vogel 3 IMG_5263Vogel 4 IMG_5259Vogel 7 IMG_5251

Stavely Building parapet decal (side on) – Gresham Hotel relief (woman’s head)
Vogel 30 IMG_5155Vogel 34 IMG_5155

Light fitting, Stavely Building – Chalk it up, DCC carpark Water St
Vogel 27 IMG_5155Vogel 2a IMG_5272Vogel 1 IMG_5270

Street furniture outside ADI (former Donald Reid Stores Building), 77 Vogel St
Vogel 44 IMG_5155

Mural by Phlegm (London), former Rogan McIndoe Building, Vogel St
Vogel 42 IMG_5155Vogel 43 IMG_5155Vogel 41 IMG_5155Vogel 40 IMG_5155Vogel 39 IMG_5155Vogel 38 IMG_5155

Former Otago Harbour Board offices (43 Jetty St) seen from Reed’s Building
Vogel 10 IMG_5218

Former Gresham Hotel, Queens Gardens, cnr Rattray and Cumberland Sts
Vogel 36 IMG_5155Vogel 37 IMG_5155

Street art by Be Free (AU), alley off Police St (behind 104 Bond St)
Vogel 12.4 IMG_5008

Related Posts and Comments:
15.10.14 Vogel St. Street Party | Saturday 18 Oct 3pm – 11pm
22.6.14 Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13) [photos]
5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact ratepayers | ….council debt
28.9.14 “DCC entitlement” about to ramrod change at CBD #manipulation
1.7.14 Jonathan Howard: ‘Changing Dunedin City: Snapshots from the air’
19.2.11 Reed Building, 75 Crawford Street for demolition?
13.6.10 No temporary cover: historic Stavely Building of Dunedin

Images by Elizabeth Kerr

38 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Innovation, Inspiration, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

DCC: Jaunt to USA, explain

Dunedin at night [commons.wikimedia.org] 1Dunedin, March 2010. Benchill (Wikimedia Commons).

### ODT Online Fri, 3 Jan 2014
Streetlight ideas from US trip
By Debbie Porteous
Seeing the bright lights of some major American cities has given the man responsible for a street lighting revolution set for Dunedin some solid ideas. Dunedin city council roading maintenance engineer Peter Standring went to the United States last year to look at different technologies and visit cities that have started updating their street lighting.
Read more

Puzzled. The news story says Peter Standring went to USA.
But lower down, it says (our emphasis):

“Los Angeles was in many ways the world leader in the procurement, installation and development of LED technology, and the group was “very lucky” to have had one and a-half hours of Mr Ebrahimian’s time, Mr Standring said.”

What group? A DCC group? (or a USA group he tagged along with?) What have we paid for? A 2013 trip for one person to Los Angeles, Durham, Racine, Chicago, Phoenix and San Francisco —or a trip for a group of staff and their wives?
Clarification, please.

****

[via Upstart Incubator (@UpstartDunedin) who tweeted at 9:29 AM on Tue, Dec 31, 2013]

### mckinsey.com September 2013
How to make a city great
By 2030, 60 percent of the world’s population will live in cities. That could mean great things for economic growth — if the cities handle their expansion wisely. Here’s how.

What makes a great city? It is a pressing question because by 2030, 5 billion people — 60 percent of the world’s population — will live in cities, compared with 3.6 billion today, turbocharging the world’s economic growth. Leaders in developing nations must cope with urbanisation on an unprecedented scale, while those in developed ones wrestle with aging infrastructures and stretched budgets. All are fighting to secure or maintain the competitiveness of their cities and the livelihoods of the people who live in them. And all are aware of the environmental legacy they will leave if they fail to find more sustainable, resource-efficient ways of managing these cities.

Explore six diverse initiatives aimed at making cities great places to live and work.

To understand the core processes and benchmarks that can transform cities into superior places to live and work, McKinsey developed and analysed a comprehensive database of urban economic, social, and environmental performance indicators. The research included interviewing 30 mayors and other leaders in city governments on four continents and synthesizing the findings from more than 80 case studies that sought to understand what city leaders did to improve processes and services from urban planning to financial management and social housing.

The result is How to make a city great (PDF, 2.1MB), a new report arguing that leaders who make important strides in improving their cities do three things really well:

█ They achieve smart growth. Smart growth identifies and nurtures the very best opportunities for growth, plans ways to cope with its demands, integrates environmental thinking, and ensures that all citizens enjoy a city’s prosperity. Good city leaders also think about regional growth because as a metropolis expands, they will need the cooperation of surrounding municipalities and regional service providers. Integrating the environment into economic decision making is vital to smart growth: cities must invest in infrastructure that reduces emissions, waste production, and water use, as well as in building high-density communities.

█ They do more with less. Great cities secure all revenues due, explore investment partnerships, embrace technology, make organisational changes that eliminate overlapping roles, and manage expenses. Successful city leaders have also learned that, if designed and executed well, private–public partnerships can be an essential element of smart growth, delivering lower-cost, higher-quality infrastructure and services.

█ They win support for change. Change is not easy, and its momentum can even attract opposition. Successful city leaders build a high-performing team of civil servants, create a working environment where all employees are accountable for their actions, and take every opportunity to forge a stakeholder consensus with the local population and business community. They take steps to recruit and retain top talent, emphasise collaboration, and train civil servants in the use of technology.

Mayors are only too aware that their tenure will be limited. But if longer-term plans are articulated — and gain popular support because of short-term successes — leaders can start a virtuous cycle that sustains and encourages a great urban environment.
Link to source

McKinsey&Company The material on this page draws on the research and experience of McKinsey consultants and other sources. To learn more about their expertise, visit the Infrastructure Practice, Public Sector Practice, Sustainability & Resource Productivity Practice.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: commons.wikimedia.org – Central city view of Dunedin, New Zealand, at night from Signal Hill lookout. The dark horizontal band above the centre of the photo is the Town Belt. Some landmarks including First Church of Otago and the Dunedin Railway Station are visible near the centre. Photo by Benchill, 9 March 2010.

6 Comments

Filed under Adventure sport, Architecture, Business, Concerts, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Hotel, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Museums, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

DCC: Councillors delegated street furniture decisions to staff

Peter Entwisle says “some principles need teasing out: CONTEXT, AUTHENTICITY, FLEXIBILITY and TRUE EXCEPTIONALITY”

Bike stand hair comb [transpressnz.blogspot.com] 1[transpressnz.blogspot.com]

### ODT Online Mon, 11 Nov 2013
Opinion
Rearranging the street furniture
By Peter Entwisle
Dunedin is adopting a new generation of street furniture. It’s happened before with varying results and we should try to do better this time.
Read more

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Free Parking – for Cycles

This item was published on 19 Jun 2012.
The rollout of 56 new cycle stands around the city is almost complete. The sites are high demand and high profile areas that were identified in consultation with community boards and cycling groups.
There are two types of stand – 46 basic U-shaped stainless steel stands, and two sets of five stands that, when installed, spell ‘cycle’. The stands were designed in-house and manufactured by local business Identimark with some parts of the manufacturing process undertaken in Auckland.
Read more

16.7.11 ODT More cyclists than a year ago: survey
Dunedin will spend $20,000 on 70 cycle stands for central city sites over the next two years.

Bicycle Management
Dunedin City Council: Cycle stands, hitching rails and facilities
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/cycling/cycle-stands

University of Otago, Property Services: Cycling & Cycle Racks
http://www.propserv.otago.ac.nz/services/parkingcyclerack.html

Related Posts and Comments:
8.11.13 Dunedin Separated Cycle Lane Proposal
5.11.13 DCC, NZTA: Cycle lanes controversy
19.10.13 Cycle lobby games and media tilts
24.9.13 Mediocrity and lack of critical awareness at DCC [council reports]
8.7.13 Bloody $tupid cycleways and Cull’s electioneering . . . [route maps]
28.3.13 DCC DAP 2013/14: Portobello Harington Point Road Improvements
26.2.13 DCC binge spending alert: Proposed South Dunedin cycle network
22.2.13 DCC: Council meeting agenda and reports for 25 February 2013
31.1.13 Who? 2010 electioneering
21.11.12 Safe cycling -Cr Fliss Butcher

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

7 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, Media, Name, NZTA, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design