Tag Archives: Strategies

What local body elections ?

Ecologist appointed to Dunedin City Council
News via Art Festival aside at ODT

### ODT Online Tue, 11 Oct 2016
Won a painting, now for a wall
A new Dunedin resident has won a painting auction; now he just needs a wall to hang the artwork on. Aalbert Rebergen recently moved to Dunedin and his admiration for the work of local artist Frank Gordon prompted a visit to his exhibition at Gallery De Novo on Saturday. The gallery was about to close when he saw the Frank Gordon painting The City of Magic & Song but could not find a price tag. […] Mr Rebergen has moved to the city to take on a new role at the Dunedin City Council as an ecologist.
Read more

We’re probably long overdue to have an ecologist on council staff.
We hear good things about Mr Rebergen, who has been with ORC.

Ecologists are specialist scientists who survey ecosystems and assess the diversity, profusion and behaviour of the different organisms within them. Ecologists tend to work for government agencies, environmental trusts, conservation charities and research institutes.
Or indeed as private consultants.

Another sort of ecology IS Dunedin City Council.
When the DCC doesn’t check leaks and drains in the hill suburbs – completely misses them despite ratepayer queries and concerns! But City Care to THE RESCUE (the company from Christchurch, best practice in hand) finds was it five burst water mains in less than a day within the same street area, where for YEARS DCC had not noticed a Cuckoo.

Infrastructure Services needs to gaze at its navel CLOSELY (another ecology!) —and Councillors, you need to check within your constituent areas for problems and complaints as well as DCC works not fully investigated and not done. (Councillors, stop desk hugging on those too generous stipends!)

nature-845849-pixabay-com-1Message to Residents and Ratepayers: DO NOT leave DCC alone

Void the leaks. Void the drainage problems of your surrounding subdivisions. Void the DCC desert that ‘serves’ us. Backfill DCC with people who know how to run infrastructure efficiently and who KNOW civil engineering for ratepayer benefit.

That is All.

BUT THEN

Job Vacancy at Dunedin City Council

CHANGE DELIVERY MANAGER
[nope, not the sort of comprehensive change we lust for at DCC but integral]

The Change Delivery Manager is responsible for leading the development, maintenance and delivery of the council’s long term application development plan as well as overseeing the implementation …
Location: Dunedin Central | Job ID: 3086108 | Closing Date: 28 Oct 2016
http://dcc.recruitmenthub.co.nz/Vacancies/3086108/title/Change-Delivery-Manager

More:
[key words below: “supports the IT Strategy”]

Change Delivery Manager
Dunedin Central

Reference: 3086108

The Change Delivery Manager is responsible for leading the development, maintenance and delivery of the council’s long term application development plan as well as overseeing the implementation of new solutions and systems and application upgrades and enhancements.

Extensive experience in programme and project management and the ability to establish and maintain a professional, customer focused service delivery culture is a must. Leading a highly motivated team of 12, you will have proven experience providing leadership, guidance and mentoring to members of the team.

Success in this role means:
Delivering the agreed requirements of the programme/project to the appropriate level of quality, on time and within budget, in accordance with the programme plan.
Ensuring our business applications are current, and implemented in manner that supports the IT Strategy.
Setting and meeting the customer’s expectations
Ensuring compliance with Governance requirements.

We are ideally seeking the following skills and experience:
Proven programme and project management delivery background.
At least 4 years’ experience leading a team.
An appropriate tertiary qualification in ICT/Business and/or well-developed ICT skills to be able to understand the technical aspects of Change and Application governance and architecture.
A demonstrable broad and deep understanding of principals of change and a range of change techniques.
Ability to capture requirements from multiple sources and translate those into effective and high performing solutions.
Excellent customer and stakeholder engagement/communication skills.
Excellent understanding and application of project/programme management, Business Analysis and ITIL practices, tools and techniques.
If you have the skills and experience we are looking for and the drive to succeed, we welcome your application.

Applications Close: 28 Oct 2016

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: pixabay.com – nature

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DCC: Draft Environment Strategy for consultation #ohchrist

Link supplied.
Fri, 7 Aug 2015 at 12:31 p.m.

Dunedin City Council Published on Aug 6, 2015
Dunedin’s Draft Environment Strategy for consultation
Mayor Dave Cull treasures the accessibility of Dunedin’s natural places and thinks we need to increase our awareness of the threats our natural places are under. Share what you treasure most about Dunedin’s natural environment, and what you think we need to change to protect, restore and enhance the things and places you treasure at www.TeAoTuroa.co.nz

Dunedin City Council
Te Ao Tūroa – The Natural World: Draft Environment Strategy

Dunedin’s natural environment is one of our greatest assets. We’re reliant on a healthy natural environment to provide food, shelter, water and clean air. Our natural spaces and unique wildlife are also a large part of Dunedin’s appeal to residents, visitors and migrants and the city’s economic wellbeing.

To ensure future generations inherit a healthy natural environment, we need to safeguard what we have, and strive to improve the health of our environment where it has become degraded. We also need to do our part to reduce our impact on the global environment, and prepare for the effects of climate change. Doing so will result in a better, more liveable Dunedin even today – cleaner water and air, awe-inspiring surroundings and experiences, healthier communities, and a more resilient economy.

Help set the strategic direction for Dunedin’s approach to the natural environment. Find out about the draft strategy and ● provide feedback by 31 August.

A workshop for stakeholders, interest groups and members of the public to discuss the draft Strategy will be held from 5:30pm Monday 10 August 2015, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Octagon, Dunedin.
█ To register your interest in attending the workshop, please email policy @dcc.govt.nz by Thursday 6 August 2015.
[date surpassed] ● EMAIL AND TURN UP ANYWAY !!!!!

Further workshops may be arranged. Check this page for details:
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/whats-on/te-ao-troa-the-natural-world-draft-environment-strategy

The Draft Environment Strategy, titled Te Ao Tūroa – The Natural World provides direction on how we, as a city, will protect and improve our natural environment for current and future generations. Te Ao Tūroa builds on the continued stewardship and guardianship by many people and organisations over the years. It identifies our environmental strengths, the environmental challenges we face, and opportunities for partnership.

Download the draft strategy (PDF, 2MB) or read the ebook:

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC strategies needed like a hole in the head

Updated post Tue, 15 Jul 2015 at 2:40 p.m.

### ODT Online Tue, 14 Jul 2015
DCC launches energy plan and environment strategy
By Chris Morris
Two new strategic plans unveiled by the Dunedin City Council should work together. […] The environment strategy aimed to safeguard the environment by reducing the human impact on it, while preparing for the effects of climate change. The draft energy plan’s focus was on energy efficiency and economic development, seeking to boost the city’s energy security and ability to adapt to change, including climate change.
Read more

Report – EDC – 13/07/2015 (PDF, 7.2 MB)
The Energy Plan – Consultation Draft

The following media release has been strongly edited for the avoidance of biliousness and nausea. How many NEW MILITARISTIC strategies does The Public need to hit the climate change / Agenda 21 councillor goofballs on the head once and for all ???!!! In order to return Dunedin City Council to prudent care of core business including, for the most part, infrastructure services and maintenance of ratepayer assets (excluding THE STADIUM, sell for scrap to Mr Hall) —NOT growing the tear-baby imaginations of the culturally, environmentally lost and bewildered. [MacTavish Cull Hawkins Peat et al]

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
DCC launches draft environment strategy

This item was published on 14 Jul 2015

Te Ao Tūroa – The Natural World, a draft environment strategy for Dunedin, was launched at Otakou Marae today […] over 11 thousand submissions were reviewed and analysed before the document was drafted.

[The council is] now seeking feedback on the draft strategy – whether [the council has] correctly identified the right themes, objectives and priorities – and [the council is] calling for ideas about the key goals and actions that should be adopted to drive its implementation. […] General Manager Services and Development Simon Pickford says the strategy is designed to focus not just locally, but also to fit into a wider context that takes account of a range of regional and national legislation, strategies and policies. “This is about sharpening our commitment to protecting our beautiful natural environment. Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities and our natural environment is one of its greatest assets.”

█ Link to draft environment strategy: http://www.teaoturoa.co.nz

Contact Simon Pickford, General Manager Services and Development on 03 474 3707. DCC Link

God save us 14.7.15

A rough sample of recent DCC STRATEGIES, POLICIES and PLANS:
[imagine the staff hours in this lot]

Art in Public Places Policy (Approved: 27 October 2010)
Asset Disposal and Write-off (Approved: 16 March 2015)
Biodiversity Strategy for Dunedin City (Approved: 20 August 2007)
Climate Change Predictions Policy (Approved: 06 September 2011)
Code of Subdivision and Development (Approved: 05 July 2010)
Dangerous, Insanitary and Earthquake-Prone Buildings Policy (Approved: 01 November 2011)
Development Contributions Policy (Approved: 24 June 2014)
Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy 2013 (Approved: ……)
Dunedin Digital Strategy 2010-2013 (Approved: 27 September 2010)
Dunedin Festivals and Events Strategy 2009-19 (Approved: 17 August 2009)
Dunedin Provisional Local Alcohol Policy [June 2015]
Dunedin Visitor Strategy (Approved: 18 August 2008)
Economic Development Strategy (Approved: 17 September 2012)
Financial Strategy (Approved: 25 June 2012)
Fraud Prevention Policy (Approved: 01 December 2014)
Gambling and TAB Venue Policy (Approved: 19 August 2013)
Grants Policy (Approved: December 2014)
Heritage Strategy (Approved: 01 October 2007)
Industry Project Fund Policy (Approved: 18 August 2008)
Internal Audit Policy (Approved: 16 March 2015)
LGOIMA Charging Policy (Approved: 30 November 2009)
Local Governance Statement (Approved: 01 March 2011)
Long Term Plan 2015/16 – 2024/25 (Approved: 29 June 2015)
New Reticulated Utility Services (Water, Wastewater or Stormwater) Policy (Approved: 22 February 2010)
Parking Strategy 2008-2018 (Approved: 14 July 2008)
Peak Oil and the Economy – Background Report (published 01 July 2010)
Peak Oil Vulnerability – Assessment for Dunedin (published 01 August 2010)

Potential Areas of Change Report (Approved: 01 August 2011)
This report summarises the research undertaken for selecting potential areas to encourage more housing and housing choice to be developed through enabling residential intensification and/or redevelopment using design criteria that will provide for good amenity outcomes for residents and neighbours. The report identifies the 14 areas recommended for consultation and potential rezoning.

Protected Disclosure/Whistleblower Policy (Approved: 26 May 2015)
Residential Capacity Study 2009 (published 01 January 2010)
Residential Research Report (published 01 October 2011)
Responsible Camping Policy (Approved: 23 September 2013)

Significance and Engagement Policy (Approved: 01 December 2014)
The Significance and Engagement Policy provides a framework for determining the significance of decisions; and when and how the community can expect to be involved in the Council’s decision-making.

Social Housing Strategy (Approved: 22 February 2010)
Social Wellbeing Strategy 2013-2023 (Approved: ……)

Spatial Plan for Dunedin
The Spatial Plan provides the Council with the building blocks it needs to ensure that, over the next 30-40 years, the city develops in the direction in which you have told us you want it to develop, about where things will be located, their design and their overall effect, and to future-proof the city against the inevitable challenges it will face, such as climate change and peak oil.

Spatial Planning and Centres: Retail in centres and improved social, cultural, and economic performance (published 01 July 2011)
Spatial Strategy for Retailing in Dunedin (Approved: 01 December 2010)
Special Character Areas Report (published 01 October 2011)

Strategic Framework (Approved: ?? 2015)
The DCC’s work is guided by a vision of Dunedin becoming ‘one of the world’s great small cities.’ To deliver on this vision, there are eight key strategies that, with some other things, make up its ‘strategic framework’. Including:
3 Waters Strategic Direction Statement 2010-2060 (Approved: ……)
Spatial Plan (Approved: 17 September 2012)
Economic Development Strategy (Approved: 17 September 2012)
Social Wellbeing Strategy 2013-2023 (Approved: ……)
30-year Integrated Transport Strategy 2013 (Approved: ……).

Treasury Risk Management Policy (Approved: 15 December 2014)

Received from Calvin Oaten at another thread.
Submitted on 2015/07/14 at 2:50 pm

Dunedin has no need to feel it is not progressive. Why, just yesterday the council announced two new ‘strategic plans’. This comes hard on the heels of a continuous screed of ‘strategies’. In recent times there has been the ‘Spatial Plan’ (whatever that is), the ‘Ten, Ten, Ten Plan’, which is aimed at increasing the population by ten percent, increase the job market by ten thousand and the average income by $10,000 pa. Then of course there are the Annual Long Term Plans.

Now we are to have this new draft environment strategy plan to secure the city’s environmental future. Plus the interrelated draft energy plan. These twin initiatives were interrelated because Cr Hawkins says so. Exactly how is yet to be seen in the detail. Cr MacTavish said the “most exciting” part of the plan was a new energy leader’s accord, under which the council would work with major energy users to share energy ideas and other initiatives. “That’s where the magic is going to happen,” she said. Cr Neville Peat said addressing energy issues was “the future of the world”, but “minimal progress” had been made until now. “This will lead us toward a low carbon footprint,” he said. Mayor Dave Cull told the committee meeting the energy plan aimed to tackle issues that were “fundamental” to the city’s economic and social future. “We need to be under no apprehensions — this is hugely important.” Now there’s some ‘learnings’ for Cr Benson-Pope to grapple with. It’s become the norm nowadays to expect this type of ‘silliness’ emanating from council. At what cost one can only wonder. More ‘green ideologies’ running rampant within our Town Hall.

Why, just on the same page of the ODT above these strategic announcements we see “NZ slated for inaction on emissions”, an article in which it cites the comment that “if NZ doesn’t pull up its socks on the global warming issue it would likely exceed 3degC or 4degC — making a world in which oceans would acidify, coral reefs dissolve, sea levels rise rapidly, and more than 40% of species become extinct.”

It is this “silliness” that will be the undoing of Dunedin as it increasingly becomes more and more irrelevant in this world. Energy is the ‘staff of life’ as far as modern society goes, whilst this city’s penchant for divorcing itself from the reality of this fact can only force that irrelevancy. Why history is totally ignored by this current ‘fad’ of ‘carbon’ hatred which is so prevalent is difficult to understand. ‘Horror to Betsy’, the atmosphere is reaching the point where CO2 content is 380-400 ppm. It’s been there before and much much higher and we have still survived. That means that 999,600 ppm is other stuff, mainly water vapour. It is water vapour plus solar cycles that have the greatest influence on Earth’s climate and consequent temperatures, CO2 is in the margin of error. Still, we are beset by this mania and I guess it will have to run its course until the IPCC and these ‘green’ acolytes finally accept the fact that they can no longer ignore history, the empirical facts, accept that they are wrong and there is no warming, sea level rise, and admit that the whole issue is a manmade concoction of ‘computer models’ not meeting the outcomes predicted. Until then Dunedin, like much of the rest of the gullible will tax itself to death and continue to bring forth the type of policies it does. Pity they couldn’t tax the ‘hot air’ within instead of CO2, then the problem would disappear from the political landscape overnight.

Related Post and Comments:
6.4.15 Energy, a little picture #wow

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: 2014 Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS)

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Tell Us What You Think!

This item was published on 20 May 2014

Letters will be sent out this week to 4,500 Dunedin residents, inviting them to take part in the DCC’s annual Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS). DCC Acting General Manager Services and Development Nicola Pinfold says, “The ROS provides a host of useful information and helps us gauge the views of residents who may be less likely to tell us what they think in other ways, such as the Annual Plan process.”

Last year, the residents randomly selected from the electoral roll were invited to complete the ROS online using a unique code, rather than receiving a hard copy of the questionnaire. A hard copy was made available on request. This was successful in raising the response rate and cutting costs so the same approach is being taken this year.

The survey is also open to all residents online at www.dunedin.govt.nz/ros and will be sent to all members of the Dunedin Peoples’ Panel. To ensure the statistical validity of the ROS results, the responses from the people who were selected are used as the official results.

“We have been using this Survey for 20 years and it has become a key tool for us to assess how well we are doing, and ultimately guiding our planning and decision-making. ROS focuses on how well we deliver our services, and asks questions about residents’ perceptions of our performance. Some of the results are used as official measures of the Council’s performance for audit purposes. But equally importantly, the feedback is used by staff and the Council to guide our thinking about how we might best deliver services to better meet the needs of Dunedin’s residents.” –Nicola Pinfold

The Survey is open until 18 June. A reminder letter and hard copy of the questionnaire will be sent to those who haven’t responded about two weeks after the initial letter, a practice that has proved successful in increasing the response rate. The results are expected to be publicly available in late July.

█ Responses from residents who independently chose to complete the Survey online are analysed separately but still provide the DCC with valuable feedback about how it can improve its services.

For the second year, all respondents will have the opportunity to enter a draw to win a prize. Each prize is worth about $150 and three winners will be drawn who will be able to choose from a range of prizes, including vouchers, swim passes or a donation to a charity of their choice. The Survey, which costs about $40,000, will be undertaken by independent research company Key Research. The results of last year’s ROS can also be viewed at www.dunedin.govt.nz/ros

Contact DCC Acting General Manager Services and Development on 03 477 4000.
DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
9.5.14 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2014/15 Submission by Bev Butler
7.5.14 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2014/15 hearings
11.4.14 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2014/15 Submissions due by 15 April
20.1.14 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2014/15
9.9.13 Residents’ dissatisfaction (2013) with elected council and mayor —increase!
27.6.13 State of the City —DCC or Dunedin? [see comment]
8.10.12 2012 Residents’ Opinion Survey: DCC spooks massage Cull, for sheep
13.6.12 DCC: 2012 Residents Opinion Survey

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr
 

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Council appointments (rumbles)

ODT 1.11.13
Vandervis rejected other posts, including subcommittee role: Cull

While the detail might be considered “divisive”, the following email exchange is in the public’s interest. Readers can make up their own minds on the content and politics.

Received.
Friday, 1 November 2013 10:37 a.m.

—— Forwarded Message
From: Lee Vandervis
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2013 10:49:07 +1300
]To: Chris Morris [ODT]
Conversation: Appointments
Subject: Re: Appointments

Hi,

Clearly my long business and Council experience has been sidelined by Mayor Cull as all inside Council Committees positions were closed to me, not just the really influential Chair positions but all other Council Committee positions as well. This is what Mayor Cull meant when he said of positions of responsibility – ‘I have given you nothing’.
The supposed ‘roles’ outside Council Committees that have been offered have been roles of so little use or interest that the Mayor was having trouble getting any Councillor, experienced or otherwise, to go on them. I volunteered for three of these outside Council Committee ‘roles’ but again was denied all of them.
Many of these outside Council ‘roles’ have been recently scraped or numbers of Councillors on them reduced, recognising that they are largely a waste of Councillor’s time. In the past the Mayor has had trouble finding Councillors willing to serve on them, and then trouble getting Councillors to show up once they had agreed to attend. At least when I was on such outside Council committees like Olveston , Regent Theatre, Settlers Museum, etc my attendance record was second to none, and I have done my long stints on minor committees, inside and outside Council since 2004.
My three years on the Otago Settlers Museum outside Council Committee was particularly frustrating as I was unable to influence the waste of vast amounts being spent on ridiculous items like the $700,000 glasshouse for the AB Steam Locomotive with cheap reflective glass!, or the insincere pushing of an insane observation tower to boost other budgets.

The Mayor should make up his mind whether he stands by his statement that ‘I have given you nothing’ or by his other claim that he has offered me roles. He can not claim both. The ‘roles’ he now claims have been offered to me are are all outside Council Committees and of so little consequence that the Mayor can not even remember which ones he has offered me. There is nothing to ‘work hard’ at or points to prove in such outside Council roles offered. My record of hard work and attendance on Council stands second to none.

I do not recall the Grants subcommittee offer, but I would have rejected it because I have done Grants before and am opposed to the wholesale degradation of the Grants process which used to promote Community Projects when I was first elected in 2004, but now has become largely a rate-paid gravy-train for the well-connected.

Hopefully that fully answers the contradictory claims by Mayor Cull that he both has, and has not, given me nothing.

Kind regards,
Lee

On 31/10/13 9:54 AM, “Chris Morris” [ODT] wrote:

Hi,

A couple of follow-ups from your email.

1. You haven’t really directly addressed the second question in my original email (below) – how you can claim to be sidelined when you were offered roles, albeit ones you didn’t really want, and turned them down?

2. The mayor says you have, to some extent, sidelined yourself by declining roles you didn’t like. Would you not have been better to accept whatever you were offered, and work hard at it to prove a point, than say no?

3. The mayor says you were (either in writing or via staff) offered at least three roles – the Toitu board role, a spot on the grants subcommittee, and a third one he can’t recall. Do you recall the grants subcommittee offer? And, if so, why did you turn that down (my understanding is that subcommittee would be an internal role)?

Chris.

On 30/10/2013 6:40 PM, Lee Vandervis wrote:

Re: Appointments

I was refused all 3 outside appointments that I indicated I would be prepared to work at, as well as all possible inside appointments by Mayor Cull.
I was only belatedly offered Toitu [which I had already just served 3 years on] and one other reserve nothing type appointment because staff could not get anyone else to agree to serve on them.

Mayor Cull has been unusually true to his word when he said “I have given you nothing”. That he now tries to pretend he has given me something after all is laughable.

I do not just claim to be sidelined, but to have been personally abused by Mayor Cull who has accused both me and Cr Calvert on nationwide TV as ‘having shonky policies’ without saying what these are.
I have great ability and experience which the biggest-spending and money-wasting Infrastructure Services Committee desperately needs and now will not get as its Chair because of a petulant Mayor who can not bear being exposed or criticised, and has given the Chair to a well-meaning Councillor with irrelevant legal training and no engineering understanding.

I wanted the University role because I have strong University connections, knowledge and mutually beneficial ideas for the University/DCC relationship which has stagnated in recent years. My wife is a senior lecturer there, I still have staff relationships for when I got my degree there, I have been a provider of sound and lighting system to the University for 30 years [and lived in Dundas st for 15] and want to improve parking, 30 km safety zones, better conference business cooperation rather than the current competition, and get real Uni/DCC joint ventures happening.

I wanted Otago Museum because I have worked there [eg supplied Butterfly House and other sound] because it is a Committee I have never been on before, and because Dr. Ian Griffin is a brilliant bloke who is open to new ideas. We share a love of astronomy and technology which few other Councillors understand.

Gasworks is again a Committee I have not been on before, and the opportunities for what could be done there became evident in my time as Chair of the Heritage Fund, and Heritage Buildings re-use Committee. Love of technology and its history also make this attractive.

My time on the Toitu Board was unrewarding mainly because of a management [since moved on] that were impervious to suggestions or my input. The extraordinary amount of money that was not well spent on the Toitu development was kept out of reach in terms of information [especially by Graeme Hall] and then Linda Wigley. I always felt that I was being treated like the proverbial mushroom when trying to get better value for the enormous spend at Toitu.
I am unaware of being offered any 3rd role unless it was some reserve Committee that nobody wanted to go on and staff were trying to get anybody at all.

On 30/10/13 3:02 PM, “Chris Morris” [ODT] wrote:

Hi Lee,

You’re probably aware I’ve had released to me today some emails relating to your run-in with Mayor Cull over the appointments process. In particular I’ve had emails relating to the outside appointments process released. They show you went for three roles, including the University Council role, but also that you were offered (and turned down) the offer to continue in your Toitu board role. Cull has also told me, in a subsequent interview this afternoon, that you were offered at least two other outside appointments verbally, the grants subcommittee and another (which he couldn’t recall), but also turned them down.

I’m interested in your comments on all this, particularly given your comments last week about the Mayor wanting to “completely sideline” you.

Can you respond to the following by 5pm:

1. Why did you turn down the outside appointments?
2. How can you claim to be sidelined, when you are offered roles and reject them?
3. The Mayor says you have sidelined yourself – what is your response?
4. Why did you want the University Council role, when it is (I’m told) traditionally always taken by the Mayor of the day?
5. Why did you want the other two roles (Otago Museum and Gasworks)?
6. Why did you consider your time on the Toitu board “unrewarding”, and the offer to continue in that role “insulting”? Aren’t there other councillors that have also accepted roles they would rather not have?
7. What was the third role you were offered and turned down? Were there any others, and why did you say no?

Feel free to add anything else and I’ll take a look.

Cheers,

Chris.

—— End of Forwarded Message

Above, Cr Vandervis says: I do not just claim to be sidelined, but to have been personally abused by Mayor Cull who has accused both me and Cr Calvert on nationwide TV as ‘having shonky policies’ without saying what these are.

[Interviewed by 3News before the elections] Mr Cull says he’s quietly confident he’ll get another term in office, and isn’t worried about his eight rivals. “Six of them have no public office experience, and the other two that do have a pretty shonky record at public office experience. You know, extreme, nutty policies.”

Mayor Cull screenshot [3 News 7.10.13] 2Screenshot —Mayor Cull (3News 7.10.13), read and view the item here.

Related Posts and Comments:
31.10.13 FYI Dunedin, through the post
29.10.13 DCC: First meeting, tidy or not
26.10.13 Mayors ‘more culpable for their council’s failings’
25.10.13 Dunedin: “no-growth city”
20.10.13 Doh, low growth for Dunedin
18.10.13 DCC: Final vote tally + St Clair boat ramp
13.10.13 Pressuring Cull and his GD Party . . .
29.9.13 Alert: Dunedin voters —Mayors gain more powers

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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FYI Dunedin, through the post

DCC FYI Dunedin 12 (November 2013)DCC News: FYI Dunedin Issue 12 (November 2013)
[click to enlarge]

This issue and others at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/fyi-dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Wellington Towards 2040

Forming the “digital powerhouse”…

Wellington’s biggest assets are its compact form, its harbour setting and the quality of life. It also boasts a highly skilled population with the highest incomes in the country.

### idealog.co.nz 29 Sept 2011 @ 11:13 am
Wellington’s new 30-year vision
By Design Daily Team
Last night Wellington City Council unanimously agreed on a long term vision for the city, one that will have sustainability, digital saviness and innovation at its core. Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown said the strategy, called Wellington Towards 2040: Smart Capital, would underpin and guide all Council strategies across economic, environmental, social, technology, transport and other key issues.

The four goals identified by the council are:

People-centred city – the aim is to be healthy, vibrant, affordable, resilient, have a strong sense of identity, and strong and healthy communities.

Connected city – this is connectedness in every sense: physical, virtual or social. Strategies like the Digital Strategy fall under this.

Eco-city – this is a response to all the environmental challenges the city faces over the coming decades, and the Council is confident [it] can lead the country by example.

Dynamic central city – this section largely deals with urban design aspects of the central city – making sure it’s still a great place to be where new ideas happen – and maintaining its role as the creative and innovative force to drive the regional economy.

Read more

WCC Report (15 September 2011)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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