Tag Archives: Stewardship

Ian Athfield at Dunedin | Open Lecture Friday 26 April

New Zealand Historic Places Trust RA Lawson Lecture

Ian Athfield — “Heritage Starts with a Great Idea Tomorrow”
Thoughts on community and heritage

New Zealand Historic Places Trust and New Zealand Institute of Architects – Southern Branch are co-sponsoring the public talk by one of New Zealand’s most well-known architects, Ian Athfield

Panel on stage – Lawrie Forbes (property developer), Glen Hazelton (DCC urban design), Elizabeth Kerr (architecture advocate), Stephen Macknight (structural engineer)

When: Friday 26 April 2013 at 7:30 pm

Where: University of Otago, St David Lecture Theatre
Union Street East, Dunedin

All welcome

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Ian Athfield-1Ian Athfield is a prominent New Zealand architect who over his 40+ year career has contributed significantly to the built environment of New Zealand. He has a strong interest in urban design, landscape and the continuing craft of architecture with an emphasis on building off the existing physical environment.

While first establishing a reputation through innovative housing, Athfield is renowned for his big picture thinking in both urban and rural environments. He has been involved in the creation of many of New Zealand’s most successful urban spaces, landscapes, and buildings. His work continues to stretch across all scales from furniture and public sculpture to architecture, landscape, and urban design; and across type from domestic to civic.

Athfield’s contribution to architecture has received widespread recognition and not only earned his practice numerous design awards but earned him the 2004 NZIA Gold Medal, an honorary Doctorate in Literature from Victoria University and in 1996 the New Zealand Government made him a Companion to the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Ian Athfield is currently serving on the Board of The New Zealand Historic Places Trust, and as a member of the NZHPT Maori Heritage Council.

http://www.athfieldarchitects.co.nz/

Related Posts:
3.3.13 RNZ Sunday Morning | Ideas: Re-imagining the Urban House
25.6.12 New Zealand Architects: Pete Bossley, and Ian and Claire Athfield
7.12.11 Ian Athfield on post-earthquake Christchurch #eqnz
19.9.11 NZIA members on Christchurch City Plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC sells Athenaeum, 23 The Octagon

Dunedin AthenaeumImage: ODT Files

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Historic Athenaeum Building Sold

This item was published on 08 Apr 2013.

The Octagon Athenaeum has been sold in an agreement which provides an opportunity to meet community needs and protect the building’s historic features.

The Dunedin City Council agreed today to accept an offer from Lawrie Forbes, for a purchase price of $900,000. The offer is unconditional, with settlement on 1 May.

Mr Forbes has developed a number of historic buildings in Dunedin and was awarded the 2012 Dunedin City Council Supreme Award for Heritage Re-Use. Mr Forbes plans to earthquake strengthen the building using his company Zeal Steel and develop part of the building for an arts and culture use.

Mr Forbes also plans to place a restrictive covenant on the property title to ensure the heritage elements of the interior and exterior of the building are retained. The covenant is to be agreed between Mr Forbes and the [New Zealand] Historic Places Trust. If agreement cannot be reached on the wording of a suitable covenant within two years, this condition lapses.

Dunedin Athenaeum and Mechanics InstituteImage: ODT Files

Following a December 2012 Council meeting, Colliers International were appointed as agents for the sale of the Athenaeum. A deadline treaty process began in January this year and four offers were received, ranging from $500,000 to $900,000.

Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says while Mr Forbes’ offer was the highest, the Council also took into account his plans to meet community needs by protecting the heritage of the building with a covenant and work closely with the arts and cultural sector.

“What makes Lawrie Forbes’ offer so attractive is the strategic alignment it has with the overall vision for the city. It is very much in line with the outcomes envisaged by the Central City Strategy, the Heritage Strategy and Arts and Culture Strategy which is being developed.”

In October 2007, the DCC bought the Athenaeum for $1,130,000, with the possibility of using the building in a large theatre development. The development did not proceed and so the decision was made to sell the property.

The purchase price will leave the DCC with an estimated debt of $100,565, which is unbudgeted and must be repaid in the current financial year. The total cost of owning the building (from 2007 to 2013), once the sale is completed, is $502,302.

On average the holding costs have been $74,000 a year and the sale means the DCC no longer has these ongoing costs, nor the risks associated with owning the property.

Athenaeum Report (PDF, 4.0 MB)
Athenaeum minutes extract (PDF, 115 KB)

Contact the Mayor of Dunedin on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Amenities Society on district plan review

Received by email today.

The Dunedin Amenities Society have held strong concerns over aspects of the District Plan for some time, particularly over the way the Plan is integrated with management of public open space and reserves. Sites like the Town Belt are actually being hampered in their management by the imposition of the Urban Landscape Conservation Area rules, which fails to have regard for its status under the Reserves act 1977. The Minister of Conservation approved a management plan for the Town Belt in 2007, but what is the point if the District Plan overrides its principles.

The Society urges all members and people of Dunedin to consider how the reserve conservation areas that we have in Dunedin should be managed and how the District Plan should complement their management rather than impede it.

The Dunedin Amenities Society established in 1888 is New Zealand’s oldest environmental society.

Visit their website at www.dunedin-amenities-society.org.nz
Follow the Society on Twitter
Visit the Society on Facebook

Here is the latest update from the Society’s website:

A Conservation Conundrum
By daseditor

The Dunedin City Council is presently undertaking a review of the District Plan and that review will mean that the Dunedin Amenities Society will also be looking at the implications of those changes. The review includes looking at creating a new open space, reserves and recreation zone which would “reflect the different types of open space and recreation areas”. The current District Plan does not recognise reserve, conservation or recreation areas as distinct entities, but rather classifies them within the zone of the surrounding land. The problem with that approach is that the activities and land use that is associated with reserve, conservation or recreation sites is often quite distinct to the surrounding land use zones. Reserve sites such as the Town Belt are often over-arched with a wider zone classification such as the “Urban Landscape Conservation Area”. Thus the rules of the District Plan override the legal protection status of the reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 without fully understanding the nature of the reserve or its values. This creates inherent problems for reserves like the Town Belt when dealing with very real conservation management issues.
In one example the current District Plan actually hampers the ability of the Council to manage areas of high conservation significance. The rules (13.8.2) associated with the management of bush within Urban Landscape Conservation Areas have inadvertently protected the highly invasive Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus). Vegetation removal in these zones is a discretionary activity, which is infinitely sensible as it protects flora and fauna on private land. However, under the District Plan the rule “does not apply where the plants to be removed are listed in any Regional Pest Plant Management Strategy applying to the district of Dunedin City”. Here lies the conservation conundrum because sycamore is not included in the Otago Regional Council’s Pest Plant Management Strategy (that’s a whole other post at a later time). Which means that under the current Urban Landscape Conservation Area rules sycamore becomes classified as “bush” and the removal of individual mature seed bearing sycamore cannot be undertaken without resource consent.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Building facade failure: “It’s only the facade at the front that can’t be used”

What is building performance monitoring, cyclical maintenance, restoration and structural repair? Or, read: Good stewardship of the built environment is eroded by owners inclined to apathy and hands-off neglect, while they continue to extract rents from tenants.

Not helped by the Dunedin City Council’s half-baked street improvements scheme for King Edward St, South Dunedin, led by ‘feel good’ inexperienced staff. This scheme puts money to the likes of unsympathetic paintwork (destroying patina of age), ugly street furniture, and traffic management plans – rather than to the means of generating funds for building conservation, first and foremost to preserve heritage values and the community’s enduring ‘sense of place’ as the basis for future development and economic return.


Images (2010): Elizabeth Kerr

Brocklebanks Dry Cleaners owner Roger Brocklebank, whose family trust owns the building, said a family trustee had met DCC chief building control officer, Neil McLeod, about the damage yesterday.

### ODT Online Sat, 13 Aug 2011
South Dunedin building facade unsafe
By Nigel Benson
A south Dunedin building was closed by the Dunedin City Council yesterday and is likely to be condemned after its facade was discovered to be cracking and leaning. The building, on the corner of King Edward St and Carey Ave, houses four businesses; Fine Art Mounting, Dinkum Donuts, Feedback burger bar and Brocklebanks Dry Cleaners.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect

### ODT Online Tue, 12 Apr 2011
Dragon it down – iconic café demolished
Work has started on the demolition of the Barrons building, home of the Dragon Café, in Rattray St.
ODT Link + Photos

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Tweet:

(10.54am) @TheLogicStudio @10PARK Similarly, SHAME on those responsible for awful puns in newspaper headlines (especially when it’s a somewhat serious subject)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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South Dunedin – better not wreck it

DCC media releases

South Dunedin’s First Heritage Open Day (14 Feb 2011) On Saturday, 19 February, a number of South Dunedin heritage treasures will be open and on display for free guided tours.

Grant Available For King Edward Street Facades (14 Feb 2011) The Dunedin City Council has launched a one-off grant for South Dunedin building owners which aims to help to improve the overall look of King Edward Street

LET’S “CREATE” TRUE HERITAGE VALUE . . .

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Bathgate was right in 1888 about city apathy

He berrated the city often on the nature of apathy and was very hot on “larrikins and butcher’s boys”

The Conservation of Heritage and Landscape in Dunedin
Posted by: daseditor | January 27, 2011
On the 11th of September 1888 Dunedin lawyer Alexander Bathgate read an address to the Otago Institute entitled “The development and conservation of the amenities of Dunedin and its neighbourhood”. The address was the catalyst for the foundation of the Dunedin and Suburban Reserves Conservation Society, the forerunner of the Dunedin Amenities Society. Bathgate outlined a vision for Dunedin that was so detailed in its construction that he apologised to his audience for “frightening you by the extent and magnitude of my programme”. What Bathgate outlined was both the protection of the existing natural landscape and the enhancement of the urban built environment in the developing city. It was a vision that blended the conservation of native biodiversity and landscape with the call home syndrome of “practical and prosaic colonists”.
From the blog of The Dunedin Amenities Society (read more)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr (via @damensoc)

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