Tag Archives: Steel

Yawn. Hyper-inflated price #scrapmetal

Sculpture_trademe_1200 [Simon Wong 3 News]Photo: Simon Wong/ 3 News

Repeat after me —I AM NOT TERRY STRINGER

### 3news.co.nz Saturday 24 Jan 2015 6:00 a.m.
Muldoon sculpture could be a steel
By Simon Wong – Online Reporter
It could just be the perfect thing for any political buff with a penchant for Sir Robert Muldoon. A 500kg galvanised steel likeness of the polarising former Prime Minister has been put up for sale on Trade Me with a starting price of $20,000. The 1.5m high bust, which is 1.2m in diameter, is being sold by Dunedin’s Zealsteel manager Lawrie Forbes who commissioned the piece in 1999. Sir Robert entered Parliament in 1960 and was Prime Minister from 1975 until 1984.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, Economics, Hot air, Media, New Zealand, People

Pinnacle Steel: Local company eyes Christchurch rebuild

Pinnacle Steel components 1 [pinnaclesteel.co.nz]

### ODT Online Tue, 17 Sep 2013
Steel firm wants to use Burnside site
By Debbie Porteous
A Dunedin steel fabricator seeking to expand its business and employ more people has applied for resource consent to build on a part of the old Burnside freezing works site in Kaikorai Valley. Pinnacle Steel wants to build a 1500sq m building, accommodating 30 employees, on the corner of Kaikorai Valley and Townleys Rds.
Company shareholder Paul Hickey said it operated from an industrial site in Sturdee St in the city, but that was cramped and the company sought a more suitable site to expand and take on new staff, in response to increased demand for fabricated steel. About 26 staff were employed by the company, but it wanted to start a production line in the new building, and would ”definitely” require more staff.

The demand for steel was coming from Christchurch, and it was expected to continue for years.

A report on the consent application from Dunedin City Council planner Darryl Sycamore to the council’s hearings committee said, according to the company, the site was used by the Burnside freezing works to hold stock and as a reservoir for the meat works’ cooling system.
[The planner] recommends the committee grant consent with conditions, including requirements to plant around the building.
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Pinnacle Steel logo (Dunedin)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: pinnaclesteel.co.nz – components(1) and logo

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Imported steel —New Zealand, “sleepy corner of the world”

The question that is increasingly being asked here is whether New Zealand engineers can be absolutely certain they have been supplied the quality of steel they ordered and whether we have systems in place to ensure standards are adhered to. The industry appears to believe the answers to both of those questions is “no”.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 05/05/2013
Engineers flag concern over imported steel
By Rob Stock – Sunday Star-Times
The Institute of Professional Engineers (IPENZ) has secretly alerted the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment of concerns about the quality of imported structural steel used in New Zealand buildings. The Institute admitted concerns about the quality of “materials and equipment including steel used in various industries – construction, engineering, and machinery” were relayed to MBIE just weeks ago, after being raised at the Institute’s annual forum in March. The Institute cautioned that the information received was “anecdotal” and “raised in a private members’ area”, adding “at this stage IPENZ is unaware of the scale of the issue, or whether they were one-off instances”.

Steel importers could easily find Chinese manufacturers willing to falsify certificates to pass off cheaper steel as high quality.

Less private, though, were two papers given at the Steel Innovations Conference in Christchurch in February, just before that March meeting, papers which for the first time publicly alluded to the issue. One paper delivered by three staffers of Australian steel company OneSteel called for the construction industry to only accept steel from manufacturers accredited by independent third parties. “In Australia, there have been some significant structural failures which have been due, either wholly or in part, to the lack of conformance of the product to the standard and the identification of its source. Unfortunately legal restrictions on the reporting of these failures means they cannot be readily identified or discussed in this paper,” the paper said. In other words, the steel was not what was ordered. Some might call it counterfeit. Evidence from the UK, the paper said, “undeniably confirms that the lack of product conformity and traceability is contributing to structural failures”.

“Engineers from quite different parts of the engineering family have realised that we all have this issue to some extent.” –John Hare, Structural Engineers Society

The second paper on the damage done by the Canterbury earthquakes to the 22-storey Pacific Tower in Christchurch, which has now been fully repaired, brings things closer to home. As one engineer familiar with the paper put it, there were instances of failure in some imported structural steel in the tower which should not have happened. “Some of the parts were damaged more than what was expected,” he said. The steel in question was imported from Singapore, and was found not to perform as well at lower temparature as New Zealand or Australian-made steel. The authors of the paper called for “rigorous traceability between mill certificates and the material used in the fabrication” for structural steel used in certain circumstances. “Steels of origins other than NZ/AU may not have the required toughness… to comply with the current New Zealand steel structures standards,” it said.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under #eqnz, Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, IPENZ, Media, Project management, Property, Site

The piles, again…and the roof

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2009
Pile-driving progresses according to plan
By David Loughrey

Work driving piles into the ground at the Forsyth Barr Stadium site is going ahead successfully, but the most difficult stage of the project, lifting about 700 tonnes of steel roof trusses into place 35m above ground, will be the major challenge of the project.
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### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2009
Hitting the roof considered to be quite a feat
By David Loughrey

Otago rugby players, and visitors to the province, will have a new challenge when they play at the Forsyth Barr Stadium. The lowest part of the stadium’s roof will be 30m high near the edge of the field, and the highest kick mapped during games when the Carisbrook Stadium Trust did its research on the issue was about 29.4m.
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