Tag Archives: Starchitects

Lady Gaga PERFORMANCE v one stodgy old starchitect

Louisiana Channel Published on Feb 18, 2016
6 Architects: Building in New York
Six celebrated architects, including Bjarke Ingels, Liz Diller and Daniel Libeskind, here talk about what it’s like to build architecture that both matters and works in the iconic city of New York – from Ground Zero to The High Line.

“A building should not look like Lady Gaga,” says American architect Robert A.M. Stern (b. 1939), who feels that the city is made up of background and foreground buildings, and that it is important to learn how to let the buildings work together instead of isolating them.

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (b. 1974) stresses how important it is to care about and understand the people one is designing for: “Architects need to re-insert architecture as something that people are interested in – not just architects – something that is important for society.”
“In a sense it was a non-site without ground to stand on.” American architect and founding partner of Snøhetta, Craig Dykers (b. 1961), talks about the challenging experience of building the 9/11 Memorial Museum Pavilion at Ground Zero.
According to American architect Thom Mayne (b. 1944), architecture is essentially “a way of thinking, exploring, inventing, making and participating in the world.”
American architect Liz Diller (b. 1954) discusses her fascinating project The High Line, which is a public park built on a historic freight rail line elevated plus 30 feet above the streets of Manhattan’s West Side.
“People stopped me: ‘Thank you Mr. Libeskind. You delivered what you promised’. They didn’t say anything else. They shook my hand. I thought that was the best compliment I could get.” Polish-American architect Daniel Libeskind (b. 1946) shares his personal story of getting to work on such a poignant project as Ground Zero.

All interviews by Marc-Christoph Wagner, Kasper Bech Dyg and Jesper Bundgaard/Out of Sync.
Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner
Edited by: Klaus Elmer
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016

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Robert Stern’s buildings are calculatedly bland and boring, not helped by walking through them!

‘Real’ pre-Xmas Gaga – singing Million Reasons and Joanne, from the new album Joanne. [Live HD on Alan Carr’s Happy Hour 16/12/16], published by esclad. All rights belong to Channel 4.

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Performance/alternatives (who is she)

LadyGagaVEVO Published on Dec 20, 2016
Lady Gaga – Million Reasons (Live At Royal Variety Performance/2016)
Courtesy of ITV Studios and RVC

LadyGagaVEVO Published on Sep 20, 2016
Lady Gaga – Perfect Illusion

Maybe you’re just a dream
That’s what it means to crush
Now that I’m wakin’ up
I still feel the blow
But at least now I know

LadyGagaVEVO Published on Dec 14, 2016
Lady Gaga – Million Reasons

If I had a highway, I would run for the hills
If you could find a dry way, I’d forever be still
But you’re giving me a million reasons

LadyGagaVEVO Uploaded on Nov 23, 2009
Lady Gaga – Bad Romance

I want your psycho
Your vertigo shtick
Want you in my rear window
Baby you’re sick

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Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta, known professionally as Lady Gaga, is an American singer, songwriter and actress. She performed initially in theatre, appearing in high school plays, and studied at CAP21 through NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts before dropping out to pursue a musical career. After leaving a rock band, participating in the Lower East Side’s avant garde performance art circuit, and being dropped from a contract with Def Jam Recordings, Gaga worked as a songwriter for Sony/ATV Music Publishing. From there, recording artist Akon noticed her vocal abilities and helped her to sign a joint deal with Interscope Records and his own KonLive Distribution.
Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta was born on March 28, 1986, at the Lenox Hill Hospital on Manhattan’s Upper East Side to a Catholic family. She is the elder daughter of Cynthia Louise “Cindy” (Bissett) and Internet entrepreneur Joseph Anthony “Joe” Germanotta, Jr. Gaga is of 75 percent Italian descent, and also has French Canadian ancestry. Gaga’s sister Natali is a fashion student. Despite her affluent upbringing on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, she says that her parents “both came from lower-class families, so we’ve worked for everything—my mother worked eight to eight out of the house, in telecommunications, and so did my father.” More at Wikipedia.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Michael Vidalis | aSocial Architects

via Academia.edu

Social Spaces by aSocial Architects?
Deciphering the Proliferation of Contemporary Heterotopias

By Michael A Vidalis
Registered Architect, MArch – Athens, Greece
PhD Candidate in Urban Sociology

Kitagata Housing project, SANAA Architects [wikimedia commons - Raphael Azevedo Franca]Kitagata Housing project, SANAA Architects. More at Google Images

We are in a new era, setting forth another perception of urban space: A totally subjective, idiosyncratic view of space.

It is supported that architecture in synergy with sociology could produce “better” architecture. Architecture that is socially functional will have an added value. Thus, a new level of meaning can be added to architecture, enhancing the quality of reading of the urban space. Additionally, a holistic and continuous dialectic juxtaposition of all perspectives (absolute, relative and relational space), produces meaning in regards to the space and its transformations.

Vasilis Avdikos (2010) notes that “The view that space has also a relational dimension, fills that void, establishing the human is, as an equal part of a relation. A dialectical relation between the structures/infrastructures and superstructures of a society, between its signifier and the signified. The relational view of space cannot function independently of its absolute and relative view. Only a holistic and continuous dialectic juxtaposition of all these perspectives, produces meaning in regards to the space and its transformations”.[1] Defining superstructures as the meanings, ideology, logic, culture, feelings, consciousnesses, values, traditions and memories, that arise as a result of the operation and use of the structures (market, laws, justice, political parties, school, etc.) and infrastructures (the “built” or man-made environment: buildings, squares, streets, technology and the like). In short, as Avdikos observes, the superstructures operate like a mirror image or reflection of the absolute and relative space, within which specific spatial frames are formed.[2]

In 1999 I was invited to present a paper in a conference; In “Towards a Social Architecture”, I supported the view that we must comprehend and address the social aspects and priorities of architecture. A short time thereafter, a journalist visited my office, surprised for the ideas presented. I replied laconically that it is surreal to think otherwise, regardless if the architectural community in the western world had abandoned the idea of a socially responsible architecture a few decades ago.[3]

It is reminded that the new architecture of the Modern Movement promised to promote or foster social change, in order to alleviate the misery of the working class in the industrial city; or, to at least ameliorate the quality of their lives. Initially the Modernists had the best of intentions for a socially responsible architecture, although they failed as their plans often contravened reality.

Nathan Glazer observed that architects did a 180 degree turn and renounced the social ideals of the Modern Movement, disillusioned with the failure of the Pruitt-Igoe housing project and similar projects. Realizing that they were incapable of addressing social problems, they abandoned the initial enthusiasm of a social agenda and decided to focus on what they undoubtedly knew best: Design. To be specific, design as a solely artistic form.

The demolition of Pruitt-Igoe (1976) would essentially mark the beginning of a new era, setting forth a different perception of space for architects: A totally subjective, idiosyncratic view of space. Sociologist Robert Gutman often noted that humans and their needs are not within the main interests of architects. In short, architects no longer concern themselves with what sociologists or social scientists have to say.

As a result, today’s spaces designed by starchitects, imbued with elements of sensationalism, surprise or disorientation, with an emphasis on escaping reality through heterotopias (Michel Foucault, 1967), etc., should come of no surprise. For architectural space produced today has as its point of departure the aforementioned negation of the social agenda; in this light, today’s architecture appears entirely logical as faithful to the new creed. Space, especially urban space, where most of humanity now resides and communicates, has become idiosyncratic, becoming a monument to its designer.

To prevent any misunderstandings, this is not to negate the entirety of contemporary architecture or imply an inferiority of the new aesthetics; but to suggest that architecture in synergy with sociology could produce better architecture. Architecture that is socially functional will have an added value. Thus, a new level of meaning can be added to architecture, enhancing the quality of reading of the urban space. For the social dimension will not limit or harm the architectural aesthetics, as some practitioners may fear. On the contrary, a holistic perspective will redefine space and its associated aesthetics, as the absolute, relative and relational readings will coexist.

As architecture is undisputedly considered an art form, the definition of art surfaces, reminding us of the feelings evoked upon reading or viewing a subjective creative work. When the social parameter is absent or suppressed, as is often the case today, the feelings produced will most likely be negative or indifferent at best. Therefore, it should be of no surprise that society often perceives architects as non-practical people, relative to the use of space by humans, i.e., in reference to the social dimension.

As a consequence of the above limited standpoint, we are often hearing architects talk amongst themselves, getting the impression that they view their profession solely as the practice of whimsical art that earns them monies; regardless of the rhetoric. A rather cynical view, by a profession that designs human space, because this is what architecture essentially does…

I don’t think that architecture is about solving human problems at all. Psychologists solve human problems, sociologists solve human problems, economists solve human problems. We’re none of those things. We do culturally necessary projects to me, which have a value for the culture in general. What should the architect do in society? I don’t think the architect should do anything, frankly. Peter Eisenman [4]

FOOTNOTES
[1] Vasilis Avdikos, “Space as relation: Methodological approaches and research framework”, Geographies, v. 17, 2010, p45 (Hellenic journal).
[2] Ibid. p42.
[3] Interview to Aris Karer. The paper was published in its entirety in Express, April 1999, Health section, p17. The title given was “Residences for … humans” (Hellenic economic newspaper).
[4] David Basulto – ArchDaily. Interview in 2011 in: http://www.greekarchitects.gr/tv.php?category=291&video=475#first_division (January 9, 2015).

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Frampton, Kenneth. Modern Architecture: A Critical History. London: Thames & Hudson, 1992.
Hayden, Dolores. The Power of Place. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The M.I.T. Press, 1998.
Harvey, David. Social justice and the city. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1973.
Lefebvre, Henri. The Production of Space. Translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers Ltd., 1991.
Massey, Doreen. Space, Place, and Gender. Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1994.
Sassen, Saskia. The global city: New York, London, Tokyo. 3rd ed. Princeton: Princeton: University Press, 2001.
Soja, Edward. Postmodern Geographies: The Reassertion of Space in Critical Social Theory. London: Verso, 1989.

SANAA (Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates) is a multiple award-winning architectural firm based in Tokyo, Japan. It was founded in 1995 by two Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima (妹島 和世 1956-) and Ryue Nishizawa (西沢立衛 1966-). In 2010, Sejima and Nishizawa were awarded the Pritzker Prize. Examples of their work include the Toledo Museum of Art’s Glass Pavilion in Toledo, Ohio; the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, NY; the Rolex Learning Center at EPFL in Lausanne; the Serpentine Pavilion in London; the Christian Dior Building in Omotesando in Tokyo; the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa; and the Louvre-Lens Museum in France. Read more

Kitagata Housing project, SANAA Architects
The apartment building is part of a large scale public housing reconstruction project located about 15 minutes from Gifu City by car. Four women architects were selected under the coordination of Japanese architect Arata Isozaki to execute the projects. This L-shaped Wing designed by architect Kazuyo Sejima sits on the south-east part of the site where the idea for the overall layout of the development was to run the buildings around the perimeter. Sejima: “Given that this building is made up of rental apartments, it could be assumed that various types of families would live in those units. In other words, we imagined that forms of co-habitation would not be restricted to the existing standard family, but that different types of groupings of people should be considered…”
In the project master plan, the courtyard lies between the four separate housing blocks designed by Akiko Takahashi, Kazuyo Sejima, Christine Hawley, and Elizabeth Diller. Because of the diversity of architectural design found within the project, strong site imagery and geometry have been created for the courtyard to unify the distinct parts of the project and to give the project a memorable identity. See more at http://gifuprefecture.blogspot.co.nz/

Gifu City - Japan. Kitigata Housing project - Terrace1 (1)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Kitagata Housing project, Gifu City, Japan – (top) Wikimedia Commons: Raphael Azevedo Franca; (bottom) via gifuprefecture.blogspot.co.nz

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Harold Marshall, acoustic architect, engineer and physicist

Philharmonie de Paris 10 [amazonaws.com]Philharmonie de Paris 10a [archi5.fr]Philharmonie de Paris

### radionz.co.nz Sunday 8 February 2015
RNZ National – Sunday Morning with Wallace Chapman
10:40 Sir Harold Marshall – Acoustical Science (Link)
Sir Harold Marshall is an award-winning and ground breaking acoustic architect who loves Bach. Knighted for services to acoustical science, the stunning new ultra-modern concert hall the Philharmonie de Paris [designed by Jean Nouvel] is the latest in a long line of prestigious projects he’s been involved with. Sir Harold explains why it is in fact the “great grandchild” of Christchurch’s Town Hall.
Audio | Downloads: Ogg MP3 ( 22′ 22″ )

Harold Marshall 1 [marshallday.com]Professor Harold Marshall, with an independent chair in Acoustics, taught the principles of acoustic design to many of us at the University of Auckland School of Architecture. The Acoustics Centre NZ is now hosted by the School of Architecture within the University of Auckland’s National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries.

Currently, Marshall Day has 16 international offices.

█ Marshall Day – Acoustic consultants & noise control engineers http://marshallday.com/regionpage/marshall-day-acoustics-new-zealand

Philharmonie de Paris Published on Jan 20, 2015

Philharmonie de Paris – Opening – January 2015
[English subtitles]
http://www.philharmoniedeparis.fr/en

### the guardian.com Thursday 15 January 2015 12.51 GMT
La Philharmonie de Paris: is this a new musical and social future for Paris?
By Tom Service
The controversial concert hall might not have been quite finished and its architect might have elected to stay away from the opening concert, but it still sounded amazing. The first sound heard in the new Philharmonie de Paris at its opening night gala on 14 January was applause: a sustained and spontaneous ovation for François Hollande and his retinue as they took their seats in the balcony of Jean Nouvel’s surreally imaginative interior, an asymmetric assemblage of gigantic floating panels, clouds and boomerangs, of crazily diverse surfaces, colours, and acoustically adjustable geometries and movable seating and stage configurations, all nested within an outer shell whose chaotic lines and curves are covered in 340,000 geometrically tessellating metallic and concrete birds. Mind you, where I was sitting, there was also exposed MDF, chipboard, half-painted flooring, and chair numbers written on Post-it notes. Nouvel – the architect who didn’t attend the opening of his own €390m project – was right: the Philharmonie simply wasn’t fully ready by the time this inaugural audience took their seats.
Read more

See also: ‘François Hollande opens Philharmonie concert hall – but without architect’ (The Guardian 15.1.15)

Philharmonie de Paris 10 [aasarchitecture.com]Philharmonie de Paris 3 [artscape.fr]Philharmonie de Paris 2 [philharmoniedeparis.com]Philharmonie de Paris 6 [philharmoniedeparis.fr]Philharmonie de Paris 1 [philharmoniedeparis.fr]Philharmonie de Paris 9 [f1g.fr]Philharmonic de Paris 13 [theatlantic.com]Philharmonie de Paris 7 [panoramio.com]

Bouygues Construction Published on Dec 18, 2014

Paris Philharmonic Hall by Bouygues Construction
[English subtitles]
Designed by Jean Nouvel, this new venue features a modular 2,400-seat auditorium, numerous rehearsal rooms and secondary performance spaces and a teaching centre. It will host concerts by leading symphony orchestras along with a wide range of cultural events. With electricity consumption below 50 kWh/m2/year, the hall meets the highest standards both for its acoustics and for the environment. http://blog.bouygues-construction.com/en-direct-des-chantiers/loiseau-fait-nid-philharmonie-paris/

Philharmonie de Paris 8 [pgoh.com]Philharmonie de Paris 12 [wallpaper.com]

Philharmonie de Paris Published on Oct 30, 2014

Le chantier de la Philharmonie de Paris : les « oiseaux »
Reportage sur le chantier de la Philharmonie. Pour tout savoir sur la fabrication et l’installation des oiseaux en fonte d’aluminium qui constituent la couverture du bâtiment et le pavage du parvis.
http://www.philharmoniedeparis.fr

parisBbg Published on Jan 16, 2015

Philharmonie de Paris – Inauguration – Concert de gala et standing ovation pour François Hollande
Premier concert donné à la Philharmonie de Paris, en présence du Président de la République – 14 Janvier 2015
Architecte Jean Nouvel

00:00 Extérieur
00:39 Intérieur
07:38 François Hollande avec Manuel Valls (premier ministre), Anne Hidalgo (maire de Paris) et d’autres personnalités
08:04 Le Requiem de Fauré, extrait de «In paradisum»
10:08 Extérieur

Bande-son: début de Daphnis et Chloé de Ravel (Suite n°2) interprétée lors du concert d’inauguration.
Orchestre et Chœur de Paris
Dir : Paavo Järvi

Philharmonie de Paris 11 [metalocuses]

█ More on Philharmonie de Paris at Google Images

█ Architect: Jean Nouvel http://www.jeannouvel.com/

See Jean Nouvel’s editorial in “Le Monde”: the reasons why I will not attend the opening of the Philharmonie de Paris (14.1.15) via his website.
[Smartphone access to that desktop link may be denied, instead go to:
http://www.jeannouvel.com/ (English) > News > Select item for 14/1/2015]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Philharmonie de Paris – (from top) amazonaws.com; archi5.fr | aasarchitecture.com; artscape.fr; philharmoniedeparis.com; philharmoniedeparis.fr; philharmoniedeparis.fr; f1g.fr; theatlantic.com; panoramio.com | pgoh.com; wallpaper.com | metalocuses.com

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ZAHA HADID – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium

dkTV Published on Nov 7, 2013

ZAHA HADID – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium
National Olympic Stadium in Tokyo by Zaha Hadid Architects
Area: 290,000 m², Capacity: 80,000 people
Estimated cost: US $1 billion, Estimated completion: March 2019

The National Stadium used for the 1964 Summer Olympics, located in Kasumigaoka, in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, will essentially be torn down in 2015 to make way for the new venue in time for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Summer Olympics. It will also be the future home of the Japanese national football team. The new Tokyo National Stadium is more than a large sports facility designed to the highest design specifications and functional requirements. It is a piece of the city’s fabric, and urban connector which enhances and modulates people moving through the site from different directions and points of access. The elevated ground connections govern the flow of people through the site, effectively carving the geometric forms of the building.

█ More on the Stadium and Hadid’s architecture at Google Images

ZahaHadid Architects Published on Sep 15, 2014

Zaha Hadid Architects
This film shows some of the people and projects of Zaha Hadid Architects. It aims to convey the ideas and ambitions behind their work. Some of their academic design research, with students from AADRL and Vienna University of Applied Arts, is also featured.

Aside —Fashion DOES something….
Science and Technology [see videos within a video]

Wired UK Published on Oct 18, 2014
Will.i.am and Zaha Hadid reveal PULS designs: full WIRED2014 talk

Full story: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-10/17/william

Will.i.am and architect Zaha Hadid have collaborated on special editions of the recently announced PULS smart cuff, which they showed off on stage together at WIRED2014 in London. The PULS smart cuff — or wise band, as will.i.am jokingly refers to it — is the first wearable product released by his company, i.amPLUS. In the UK it will be sold by O2 and will be available pretty soon, if hints are to be believed. “I’m itching to say when it’s coming out,” says will.i.am, before not-so-subtly whispering, “Now-vember”, in the direction of the audience. The PULS is a “standalone communication and socialisation device” that contains a battery, speakers, SIM card and chipset. It sports a curved OLED screen and has 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS. “No phone required; this is your phone,” says will.i.am, demonstrating one of the two cuffs he himself wears on his wrist.

█ More Google Images for Zaha Hadid
Google Images for Zaha Hadid Product….

Zaha Hadid. Superyacht for Blohm+Voss - birdseye [archdaily.net]Zaha Hadid. Superyacht design for Blohm+Voss. Photo: archdaily.net

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Charles Jencks —extreme emotion and neutrality

Dalian International Conference Centre, China 4

►► Jencks excerpts [click to enlarge or ctrl +]

Jencks, Charles - Architecture Becomes Music. Essay 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 1

Jencks - Architecture Becomes Music. 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 2b

Ed Sheeran Published on Oct 7, 2014
Ed Sheeran – Thinking Out Loud [Official Video]
Here’s my official video for ‘Thinking Out Loud’, I learnt to dance! Taken from my album ‘x’, available to buy via iTunes here: http://smarturl.it/x-itunesdlx

Jencks - Architecture Becomes Music. 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 3a

TaylorSwiftVEVO Published on Nov 10, 2014
Taylor Swift – Blank Space
Watch Taylor’s new video for “Blank Space”. No animals, trees, automobiles or actors were harmed in the making of this video. Taylor’s new release 1989 is Available Now on iTunes http://www.smarturl.it/TS1989

Dalian International Conference Centre, China 9

Coop Himmelb(l)au, Dalian Conference Center, China, 2008-12.
A continuously changing surface that rises and falls and bulges in the middle to include a theatre and opera house. Organised like block chords of music that open up and close, it is reminiscent of both Wagnerian chromaticism and the tonal melding of Philip Glass and John Adams.

Jencks - Architecture Becomes Music. 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 4a

http://www.coop-himmelblau.at/architecture/projects/dalian-international-conference-center

Dalian International Conference Centre, China 3Dalian International Conference Centre, ChinaDalian International Conference Centre, China 2Dalian International Conference Centre, China 7Dalian International Conference Centre, China 6Dalian International Conference Centre, China 5Dalian International Conference Centre, China 8Images: Coop Himmelb(l)au —Wolf D. Prix and Partner ZT GmbH

█ More at Google Images

█ Download: Charles Jencks – Architecture Becomes Music | The Architectural Review 6 May 2013 via academia.edu [research]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Norman Foster, [A]rchitect

As the great British architect Norman Foster turns 75, he talks to Jonathan Glancey about flying cars, his new underground city – and how he beat bowel cancer.

### guardian.co.uk Tuesday 29 June 2010 21.31 BST
Norman Foster at 75: Norman’s conquests
By Jonathan Glancey
“The other day,” says Norman Foster, “I was counting the number of aircraft I’ve flown: from sailplanes and a Spitfire to a Cessna Citation. By chance, it comes to 75.” So Foster, who turned 75 this month, has decided to make models of all 75, to hang in his own personal museum, which he keeps at his Swiss home, an 18th-century chateau set in vineyards between Lausanne and Geneva.
These model aircraft will hover over his collection of some of the 20th-century’s greatest machines, cherished for both their engineering brilliance and streamlined beauty; many of them look like winged or wheeled versions of Foster’s most innovative buildings. “At the moment,” says the architect, “I’m restoring a Citroën Sahara, designed to tackle north African dunes. I’m also thinking of getting a Bell 47 helicopter as a focal point. And I’ve had a model made of the Graf Zeppelin airship.”
The subject [architecture] is too often treated as a fine art, delicately wrapped in mumbo-jumbo. In reality, it’s an all-embracing discipline taking in science, art, maths, engineering, climate, nature, politics, economics. Every time I’ve flown an aircraft, or visited a steelworks, or watched a panel-beater at work, I’ve learned something new that can be applied to buildings.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Can Dallas turn a complex of starchitect buildings into a vibrant urban district?

### architectmagazine.com January 20, 2010
Architect: Design
Enough Arts; More District
By Cathy Lang Ho
Dallas seeks to create a vibrant urban neighbourhood out of a slew of starchitect buildings. It’s not the first city to pin its hopes for a shot of urban adrenaline on dazzling new cultural buildings, but it’s among the more ambitious.

The Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House by Foster + Partners, the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre by REX/OMA, and the Elaine D. and Charles A. Sammons Park by landscape architect Michel Desvigne are the latest additions to the downtown arts district, a 68-acre area that already includes structures designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes, I. M. Pei, Renzo Piano, and Brad Cloepfil.

The newly completed projects—along with an outdoor amphitheatre by Foster and another theatre by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, slated for completion in 2010 and 2011, respectively—constitute the AT&T Performing Arts Centre, the largest and most costly performing arts complex built in the United States since Lincoln Centre, which, of course, grandfathered the trend of arts districts doubling as urban development tools.
Read more + Slideshow

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