Tag Archives: Stakeholders

Roading network screwed by council staff

UNDEMOCRATIC—Council staff agendas are directing major changes to Dunedin’s road networks. Continued use of exclusive ‘workshops’ lacks transparency and accountability.

Cr Hilary Calvert asks ‘why councillors were not more involved in developing the strategic cases’. (ODT)

Cr Lee Vandervis says ‘the problems identified were based on ”absurd or probably false” assumptions’. (ODT)

STAFF ASSUMPTIONS
► There is too much parking in Dunedin
► Restricted parking will increase use of public transport
► Encouraging more people to cycle makes roads safer

  • ### ODT Online Tue, 6 May 2014
    Council notes roading strategic cases
    By Debbie Porteous
    The first step towards securing funding for major changes to Dunedin’s road networks has been taken by the Dunedin City Council, even though exactly what those changes will be is yet to be decided. Councillors yesterday noted council staff had taken the first of six steps in a new process for applying for funding from the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).
    Read more

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    Strategic Case Development for Improvements to Dunedin’s Central City and Freight Network
    Report – ISC – 05/05/2014 (PDF, 993.6 KB)

    Excerpts from the report…

    Council staff have recently submitted two Strategic Case applications to the NZ Transport Agency; one for investment to improve the access, mobility and safety of the Central City; and the other to enhance Dunedin’s Freight Network. Pending approval from the NZTA, Council staff will begin the Programme Business Case stage, where investment options and alternatives will begin to be developed and defined. Staff will seek Councillor support and input prior to the submission of the Programme Business Case to the NZ Transport Agency, anticipated to be later this year.

    The NZ Transport Agency has recently adopted a Better Business Case approach to guide the planning and project development for investment applications. It is a principles-based approach that clearly links their investment goals to outcomes, and defines problems and their consequences thoroughly before solutions are considered. This approach ensures a shared view of problems and benefits early in the transport planning process. The business case approach encourages early engagement with stakeholders to confirm:
    ● fit with strategy and need to invest
    ● the way forward with short-listed options
    ● that the best value option is affordable and deliverable and that the risks are acceptable.

    To execute many of the projects outlined in Dunedin’s Integrated Transport Strategy requires funding from external sources. A significant source of transportation funding is potentially available from the NZ Transport Agency. As detailed above, Council must now apply for funding from the NZ Transport Agency through their Better Business Case approach. This stepped approach ensures that any solutions are in response to clearly defined problems, and are aligned to the NZ Transport Agency’s investment goals.

    Council staff held initial discussions with key stakeholders, the NZ Transport Agency and the Otago Regional Council to define the areas of focus for investment. The group agreed that the Council should focus on establishing two Strategic Cases: 1. Dunedin Central City: Access, Mobility and Safety; 2. Dunedin Freight Network. These areas strongly align with those set out in our Integrated Transport Strategy.

    The first step of establishing the Strategic Case is to develop an Investment Logic Map (ILM). The ILMs set out the key problems and the benefits of solving the problems. Two ILM workshops were hosted for each of the areas of focus. Participants included the key stakeholders (DCC staff, Council Committee Chairs – Cr Wilson, Cr Benson-Pope, Cr McTavish; NZ Transport Agency and the ORC) and relevant partner organisations (including Otago Chamber of Commerce, Public Health South, Port Otago Ltd, Kiwirail, and Heavy Haulage Association).

    [see ILMs for each Strategic Case at Attachment 1]

    Strategic Case – Executive Summary
    Staff from the Dunedin City Council (DCC), the NZ Transport Agency and Otago Regional Council (ORC), as well as the Public Health Service and the Otago Chamber of Commerce participated in two Investment Logic Mapping (ILM) workshops to identify the key access, mobility and safety problems in central Dunedin, and determine the benefits of investing in solutions that address these problems.

    This report sets out the strategic case for improving access, mobility and safety in central Dunedin. Part A provides the strategic context and fit of the proposed investment and the evidence to support the justification for investment. Part B describes how the three contributing organisations intend to develop the next stage of business planning – the programme business case. This section outlines the further planning needed to achieve the identified benefits.

    This application shows that that there are some key synergies between the strategies and objectives of the three key stakeholder organisations, where priorities for future investment align. Evidence supporting each of the key problems identified in the ILM workshops is outlined section 3.4, and reveals a strong case for change and need for investment.

    3.1 Defining the Problem
    Dunedin City Council convened a facilitated investment logic mapping workshop that was held on 10th February 2014, with key stakeholders to gain a better understanding of current issues and business needs. The stakeholder panel identified and agreed to the following key problems:

    Problem one: SH1, the railway and north/south arterial routes bisect areas of high pedestrian use resulting in dislocation and poor connectivity of key areas

    Problem two: The design, use and management of central city routes results in intermodal conflict

    Problem three: Management and provision of car parking is not integrated into the transport network, which favours car use, impacting adversely on the quality of life in the City

    Problem four: The design, management and lack of integration of public transport discourages use and leads to low patronage

    [see the Investment Logic Map at Appendix A]

    3.2 The Benefits of Investment
    The potential benefits of successfully investing to address these were identified as part of a second facilitated investment logic mapping held on 17th February, 2014. The stakeholder panel identified and agreed the following potential benefits for the proposal: (CONFIRM)

    ● Benefit one: Reduced severance
    ● Benefit two: Improved safety
    ● Benefit three: Central City is a ‘nice place to be’
    ● Benefit four: Greater resilience

    [see Benefit Map at Appendix B]

    Figure 1: High risk areas identified through risk mapping

    Figure 1 High risk areas identified through risk mappingA risk assessment process known as KiwiRAP maps the collective crash risk of roads based on the physical and operating characteristics of intersections and corridors, as well as crash history. The map shows that Dunedin’s high risk areas (shown in black and red) are predominantly located within the central city, as demonstrated in Figure 1.

    4 Strategic Context
    This section demonstrates how the investment proposal has clear linkages to existing strategies of each of the stakeholders. There are some key synergies between the three organisations, where priorities for future investment align. A summary of the strategies that support this investment proposal from each of the stakeholders is detailed below. The goals and/or objectives selected are those with direct relevance to this investment proposal.

    6.4 Scope
    The evidence to support the three problem statements developed during the Investment Logic Mapping workshops generally provides a strong case for change. It is also evident that many of the problems have existed for some time as many of the issues raised were recognised in the MWH 2003 Strategic Corridor Study and the 2006 Transport Strategy.

    7.1 Risk/Issues and Opportunities
    Key risks for this business case are likely to include:
    ● Alignment with Regional Land Transport Plan and Council’s Long Term Plan Timeframes
    ● Ability for Council to raise funding co-contribution
    ● Support for the projects from Councillors
    ● Support for the projects from the community
    ● Further deaths and serious injuries from crashes should the project not proceed
    Appropriate risk management strategies for these key risks will be identified at the Programme Business Case stage. As the busine ss case evolves and projects are defined it is likely that other risks are likely to be identified and these will be added to the risk register.

    Read full report here.

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    Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy 2013
    Developing, maintaining and operating any transport system requires investment, and investment requires decision-making about what to invest in, how much to invest and when that investment should be made. Such decisions need to be informed by an understanding of the key issues and opportunities to be addressed, a clear vision of what is to be achieved, and a clear set of priorities that will move toward that vision. In times of financial constraint when funding is tight the need to clearly identify the right priorities becomes even more important. The DCC have adopted a Financial Strategy which aims to help steer a course between the competing tensions of affordability, keeping up and investing for the future. This Financial Strategy states the limits to rates and borrowing that the Council has set, and any investment in transportation infrastructure must be managed with regard to the Financial Strategy.

    Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy 2013 [links]
    Pre-election Report 2.8.13 [links]
    Financial Strategy

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    32 Comments

    Filed under Business, COC (Otago), Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, NZTA, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

    Dunedin and the southern region’s business future

    THE CLIMATE
    (we’re sluggish, indebted and unproductive, working long hours for unremarkable results, there’s little or no ability to pay all our living expenses even if we can afford a mortgage — few Dunedin businesses are on the global map, very few of our citizens invest in ‘research and development’ or know what export truly involves — there is splendid isolation, no cohesion, and a striking absence of astute regional leadership)

    Our economy is drifting in very dangerous shoals. The only plausible avenue to sustained growth will be export-led. The high value of the dollar precludes this. Unless we act now the painful process of rebalancing our economy will be forced upon us at some future stage. At that point the pain will be even greater.

    ### ODT Online Fri, 4 May 2012
    Opinion
    Boosting export sector only way out of malaise
    By Peter Lyons
    We are living in a world of zombie economies including our own. These economies are characterised by high debt levels, stagnant or shrinking economies and policies of austerity that offer no solution. Finance Minister Bill English is promising a budget of little hope. He offers austerity almost with relish. It fits his ideological bent towards smaller government. A further unexpected $1 billion budget shortfall precludes any positive spending initiatives. Meanwhile the governor of the Reserve Bank wrings his hands over the high New Zealand dollar which is shredding our export sector. He has maintained this ineffective stance for a number of years.

    Positive economic management appears beyond the scope of our policy makers.

    New Zealand has been in or on the verge of recession since 2007. Most of the Western world has followed a similar path.
    Read more

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    LOCAL SENSELESSNESS
    (where the ad hoc stadium spend has crippled the council, all the time missing the bigger outlook of how to serve the South Island’s contribution to export-led economic recovery — oh hey, the council’s junior bureaucrats and mayor say let’s play dress-ups with a few central city warehouses and six suburban amenity centres — the Dunedin City Council has to undergo major attitudinal and structural change)

    Apart from the ongoing clusters, there has never seemed to be any straightforward strategy to push economic growth in the city or the region.

    ### ODT Online Sat, 5 May 2012
    Planning for future of Dunedin Inc
    By Dene Mackenzie
    Dunedin’s economic development draft strategy will be released on Monday. For the first time, the document will be signed off by stakeholders representing diverse areas of the city. There are several things business editor Dene Mackenzie hopes will be included in the new 10-year plan. For about 25 years, Dunedin’s economic strategy has doddered along. Past plans have included Dunedin City Council officers travelling to visit large-scale manufacturing enterprises in a bid to persuade them to establish themselves within the city boundaries, through to catchy slogans and billboards at airports. During that time, the city has seen its large-scale manufacturing base shrink with the loss of thousands of jobs.

    Reviews of city council funding strategies need to be undertaken and the strategy must be inclusive of the needs of the business community. It seems that, often, funding decisions are applied on an ad hoc basis, when better value could be extracted from ratepayer funds.

    More than 90% of Dunedin businesses are said to have no intention of exporting in the future and the city captured only 2.5% of the country’s recent migrants. That must change for the city to grow and prosper.
    Read more

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    39 Comments

    Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Media, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design

    Public consultation on Carisbrook

    ### ODT Online Wed, 23 Jun 2010
    Carisbrook’s cost issue for meeting
    By David Loughrey
    The Carisbrook stadium and car park could cost $439,000 a year to maintain after the Dunedin City Council takes over the properties next year. That information is just one matter to consider when a group of “stakeholders” meets at Carisbrook next Monday, beginning a public consultation process on the future of the ground.

    An invitation to the meeting asked those invited to “present your ideas for the future of the facility”.
    Cr Richard Walls said yesterday the meeting was not just for stakeholders, and anyone could attend.
    A timetable shows a forum would be set up on the council’s website for the public to post ideas, and a public meeting held at Carisbrook on July 8, with a deadline for proposals of July 26.

    Read more

    Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

    Have your say on Carisbrook’s future at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/public-consultation/consultations/future-of-carisbrook/_nocache

    12 Comments

    Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Politics, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Urban design

    DCC: “Your City/Our Future” Community Engagement Programme

    Tabled at Dunedin City Council’s Finance and Strategy Committee Meeting on Monday:

    Report – FSC – 21/06/2010 (PDF, 192.9 kb, new window)
    “Your City/Our Future” Community Engagement Programme

    “It is proposed that the Council’s futures thinking on the City Development Strategy (Spatial Plan), the Sustainability Programme and the Community Outcomes be undertaken in a single co-ordinated programme… This community engagement programme is a key element of the strategic direction for the City and the Council’s agreement is sought to the proposed approach. Councillors will be involved at key stages to provide leadership in reviewing and setting the vision for the city.”

    Post by Elizabeth Kerr

    8 Comments

    Filed under Design, Economics, Geography, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design