Tag Archives: Spatial Plan

DCC 2GP (district plan): Residential parking + Medium density housing

A flyer received this week at Pitt St…. (the photo is lower Scotland St)

DCC residential parking survey flyer Oct 2014

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Surveying Views on Parking

This item was published on 21 Oct 2014

The Dunedin City Council wants to hear what the public thinks about possible changes to how parking is managed in areas close to the CBD. Areas include City Rise, residential streets near the campus, the Warehouse Precinct, and around Lower Princes Street, Smith Street, York Place and Harrow Street.

Under a review of Dunedin’s District Plan, the DCC is looking at whether the number of off-street car parks required for dwellings in these areas should be reduced. “While this would make more space available for inner city living and could improve neighbourhood amenity, it would also mean more demand for on-street parking,” says City Development Manager Anna Johnson. “To manage this, the DCC may make changes to how parking is managed, with more on-street car parks in the affected areas being reserved for residents with permits or for visitors parking for up to two hours. This would mean that fewer on-street parks would be available to commuters,” says Ms Johnson.

Before any decisions on these matters are made, an online survey will query what the general public, affected residents, commuters, developers, businesses, schools, and other affected organisations think. Survey results will then be used by the DCC to help decide how parking in the affected areas should be managed. If any changes are proposed to District Plan rules for off-street parking, people will be able to make submissions on these changes next year, when the reviewed District Plan is notified. Any changes to these rules would not be likely to come into force until 2016.

In most of the affected areas, changes to on-street parking would only be proposed after the changes to District Plan off-street parking rules had taken place. However, where on-street parking pressure is already particularly high changes may be considered earlier. This could include, for example, areas around Royal Terrace, Heriot Row, London St and Cargill St and parts of City Rise, such as around Arthur Street. If any changes to on-street parking are proposed there will be formal consultation and people will be able to make submissions on the proposals.

█ Online surveys will be available from Wednesday 22 October to Friday 7 November from http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp and paper surveys are available on request from the DCC. Please call 03 477 4000 to request a hard copy to be sent in the post.

Contact Anna Johnson – City Development Manager on 03 474 3874.

DCC Link

****

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Medium Density Housing Zones Identified

This item was published on 21 Oct 2014

The growth in one to two person households in Dunedin has prompted a rethink of how we look at residential development. As part of the development of the Dunedin Spatial Plan and the city’s second generation District Plan (2GP), Dunedin City Council staff have been working with stakeholders and experts, and consulting with the community, to identify areas that should provide for medium density housing, particularly in areas close to centres, public transport, and community and recreational facilities.

Medium density relates to how many residential units there are per section. Medium density housing can be in the form of houses on small sections, semi-detached or terraced houses, or two to three storey apartment buildings on larger sections. Much of South Dunedin and the residential areas around the University of Otago are examples of areas that are developed to a “medium density” level.

DCC City Development Manager Anna Johnson says various ideas about where to provide medium density housing have been tested through different stages of consultation. As a result of that feedback and further field work, a final set of areas to be included in the 2GP, to be notified in the first half of next year, has been proposed.

Many of these areas are already zoned for, or developed as, medium density housing, but some new areas have been identified to cater for a predicted growth in demand for different housing types. From this week, owners and occupiers in areas of medium density zoning will be given a chance to see what is proposed in these areas and to provide feedback on the key draft Plan provisions.

Ms Johnson says the need to identify such areas reflects Dunedin’s changing demographics. “The city’s largest demographic growth area is one to two person households, which includes couples with no children at home. These so-called empty nesters often want to make a move to warm, low maintenance forms of housing in their existing neighbourhoods. We need to ensure the city’s planning rules have scope to do that.”

The proposed medium density zones would require a minimum site size of 200m2 for subdivision. In terms of existing sites and newly-subdivided sites, 45m2 of land would be required for each ‘habitable room’, which equates to a room that is, or could be, a bedroom. Providing all performance standards related to the building were met, this would allow, for example, a four bedroom house, or two semi-detached residential units with two bedrooms each, to be built on a 200m2 site.

Research by DCC planning staff and public submissions on the 2GP point to the need for medium density housing in areas where there is good access to public transport, community facilities and green spaces. There are 23 areas that have been identified for medium density zoning. Five of these may need infrastructure upgrades if significantly more development occurred. The 23 areas include areas that are already zoned medium density, areas where development is at a higher level than is currently permitted and areas that might benefit from redevelopment to improve the range and quality of housing available. It also includes areas where there is a market for more housing choices, where some change in housing types can occur without a major impact on existing amenity values.

Neighbourhoods already zoned for medium density (residential 2, 3 and 4) include areas below the Town Belt, around the University campus and parts of Caversham and Mosgiel. Areas where there is already quite a lot of medium density housing include parts of Mornington, City Rise, the Gardens area and North East Valley. In some suburbs, such as Opoho, Roslyn, Belleknowes, Andersons Bay, Waverley and parts of Caversham, residential 1 zoning currently restricts building to a minimum 500m2 site, but there is a market for more housing choices.

“We believe medium density housing could be provided for, with appropriate design standards, in areas like these without significant impact on the amenity values of the area,” Ms Johnson says. “Ultimately we want to spread the options for medium density housing across the city and not just be focusing on older areas that may be perceived as less desirable. We want people to have choices as they get older. Not everyone who wants to live in an apartment or low maintenance home wants to live in the central city. People want choices in their own neighbourhoods and there is a growing demand for quality smaller homes in our popular suburbs.”

In addition to the medium density housing zones, a further eight areas are proposed to be zoned as heritage residential zones, but with density and plan provisions similar to those for medium density zones.

█ From Wednesday, visit http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp for more details and to fill out a survey on medium density housing. Consultation closes on Friday, 7 November.

Contact Anna Johnson – City Development Manager on 03 474 3874.

DCC Link

● ODT 24.10.14 Plan changes target housing, parking

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

23 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Hot air, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin’s industrial land

Alistair Broad – is he having a meltdown, or what?

Why is freehold baron Earl Hagaman not mentioned in this story?

[why is DCC’s treatment of the Caledonian leaseholders vaguely referenced, not by name… ugliness alert]

Oh dear, moths flying around the noble art of leaseholding as it may hold back development – what do they want? For Port Otago Ltd and Otago Regional Council to relinquish their power and wealth? Why should they?

What have Hilary Calvert and investor friends got to do with all this? The plot thickens.

Has this really anything to do with city councillors, EMT and the City Development Team (including the shattered urban design team) using “friends” to arbitrate change in the property sector. District plan and spatial plan objectives to be met for (cough) economic development?

### ODT Online Thu, 12 Jun 2014
Businessman slams leasehold ‘parasite’
By Shawn McAvinue
Leasehold land is a ”parasite” killing development in Dunedin, property owner and businessmen Alistair Broad says. Mr Broad, of Dunedin, says property developers are reluctant to invest in Dunedin because of the large amount of leasehold land.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

18 Comments

Filed under Business, Carisbrook, DCC, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Hot air, Media, Name, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, What stadium

DCC: Growth v development contributions

Worth a read —Whaleoil link received from Anonymous
Tuesday, 11 February 2014 8:11 p.m.

Whale Oil Beef Hooked logo### whaleoil.co.nz February 10, 2014
Why do Property Developers hate development contributions?
By Cameron Slater
A property developer writes:
“Lately Developers and Councils have been busy preparing submissions on the proposed changes to the Local Government Act relating to development contributions. There are many issues. Firstly, the issue with charging developers for improvements that have nothing to do with growth.
(1) Hiding the real cost apportionment and charging developers for improvements that [have] nothing to do with new development growth:
When developing up capital works and budgeting the Annual Plan councils develop formula and apportion some of the costs to ‘growth’ – which is then charged to developers. Councils argue that as cities grow and intensify – the costs of that growth include replacing or improving infrastructure. Hence they want new developments to pay for it.
Developers take issue however with the amount of money required from them to pay for the infrastructure improvements not that they have to pay for their share of growth. As such the argument is about whether the right pro-rata apportionment is applied.
Obfuscating the debate is that all Councils must replace infrastructure as it ages and is due for replacement. Additionally, most Councils are in recent times adopting new development standards that increase the capacity of assets and they improve assets as technology advances.
Replacing assets is supposed to occur from a built sinking fund that is generated over the life span of an infrastructure asset. Council receive money over the lifespan in cash as depreciation as part of rates. Over time, and subject to annual revaluation each asset builds up a depreciation sinking fund that should be sufficient to replace it. Developers are concerned that Councils spend that money through internal loans to OPEX and other creative accounting and then hope to use ‘growth’ as a mechanism for replacing the assets. A psuedo ponzi scheme with ratepayers the duped investors.”
Read more

****

DCC: Development Contributions Policy
Development contributions are charges paid by property developers to meet the increased demand for infrastructure resulting from growth.
The Council is proposing some significant changes to its Development Contributions Policy.
In April 2011, the Council released a Statement of Proposal to adopt a Draft Revised Development Contributions Policy (the Draft Policy). The proposal included a schedule of charges which could apply if the Draft Policy was adopted. Submissions on the Draft Policy closed in July 2011 and were followed by hearings in November 2011. After beginning its deliberations the Hearings Committee decided that more information was required from Council staff before the Draft Policy could be considered further. Deliberations started again in December 2012 with Council staff reporting back to the Committee on the information it requested. The Committee has yet to conclude its deliberations.
As a final decision on the Draft Policy is yet to be made, the Council’s existing Development Contributions Policy applies until further notice. Read more

DCC: Spatial Plan for Dunedin
‘Dunedin Towards 2050′ (The Spatial Plan), sets the strategic direction for Dunedin’s growth and development for the next 30+ years. It outlines a broad set of principles, strategic directions, policies, and actions and visually illustrates how the city may develop in the future. It will be used to guide land-use planning in the city as well as influencing how future infrastructure and services may be provided or limited. The Spatial Plan is primarily, but not solely, concerned with Dunedin’s urban form and design. Urban form and design refer to the spatial arrangement of a city, in other words, the shape of a city as seen from the air including the overall pattern of development, activities, and infrastructure as well as the design or ‘look and feel’ of the city and how it functions. Urban form and design have a significant impact on the sustainability, liveability and economic performance of cities.

DCC: Second Generation Plan for Dunedin
The Dunedin City District Plan controls what people can do on their land and how it can be developed. While there have been some changes and new zones added (eg the Stadium, Airport and Harbourside zones), most of the current Plan has not been reviewed since 2006 and a lot of it dates back to the 1990s. The council is reviewing the Plan as a whole to fix the parts that are not clear or working properly, to recognise the changes to land use and development within Dunedin, to discourage poor development and to align with changes in national policy guidance. The review will produce a second generation plan (2GP), which is the second plan prepared under the Resource Management Act 1991. This is a long process with a lot of research and analysis, and input from stakeholders and the community.

DCC: Strategic Directions
The Strategic Directions of the second generation plan will establish the overall management approach for the 2GP, stating the important outcomes for the city:
● Dunedin is Environmentally Sustainable and Resilient
● Dunedin is Economically Prosperous
● Dunedin is a Memorable and Distinctive City with a Strong Built and Natural Character
● Dunedin has Strong Social and Cultural Capital
● Dunedin has an Attractive and Enjoyable Built Environment
● Dunedin has Affordable and Efficient Public Infrastructure
● Dunedin has Quality and Affordable Housing
● Dunedin is a Compact City with Resilient Townships

On the local . . .
Meanwhile, developers across the Taieri are champing at the bit to re-create ‘Wanaka sprawl’ on the flood plain with little regard for the protection of high class soils —despite the objectives of the spatial plan that places wise emphasis on the rural area becoming the city’s food basket (resilience).

Pearl of the Plain (Mosgiel sign) 3### ODT Online Wed, 12 Feb 2014
Benefits seen for Taieri area
By Rosie Manins
Mosgiel, Middlemarch and the wider Taieri area will benefit from a new marketing approach by the Dunedin City Council, chief executive Sue Bidrose says. The establishment of an in-house marketing agency at the council, replacing Tourism Dunedin, would offer ”more bang for buck”, she said. The agency would use existing council staff, such as those in human resources and finance, and run alongside the council’s economic development unit.
Read more

sue bidrose [whatifdunedin]New chief executive Sue Bidrose says the council will review performance of the in-house marketing agency after 18 months, with a view to assessing if in the longer term the agency should become a council-owned company. (via ODT)

Other ODT stories:
Riccarton Rd widening set to begin Asked if the upgrade was designed to accommodate more heavy vehicle traffic, Mr Matheson played down those concerns. [Evan Matheson hasn’t referenced the revising ‘district plans’ then]
Trail trust awaits talks outcome The group behind a project aiming to provide a cycle link between Mosgiel and Dunedin is awaiting the result of crucial land negotiations.
Crematorium not yet begun Hope and Sons is yet to begin construction of its new Mosgiel crematorium, but hopes to have it operating this year. Managing director Michael Hope said it was still working on gaining building consent.
Police presence of concern
Town’s population to disappear Mosgiel’s Pearl of the Plain sign in Quarry Rd is to lose its population figure and receive a general spruce-up. [spot feathery bill]
Hope signal problems fixed

Syd Brown Mosgiel sign 1Syd Brown, Taieri property developer and ex city councillor/FSD chairman

Related Posts and Comments:
10.2.14 University of Otago major sponsor for Highlanders [rugby, a pool]
5.2.14 Mosgiel pool sluts get their tops off for ex ORFU guy
4.2.14 DCC: Mosgiel Pool, closed-door parallels with stadium project . . .
30.1.14 DCC broke → More PPPs to line private pockets and stuff ratepayers
20.1.14 DCC Draft Annual Plan 2014/15 [see comment & ff]
18.11.13 DCC: New chief executive
16.11.13 Community board (Mosgiel-Taieri) clandestine meetings
7.10.13 DCC councillors, no idea annual cost of owning, operating FB Stadium
23.6.13 DCC Community Boards
21.4.13 Councils “in stchook” —finance & policy analyst Larry.N.Mitchell
6.12.12 Local Government Act Amendment Bill
6.12.12 DCC debt —Cr Vandervis
6.9.12 DCC pays out $millions to cover loss making stadium and rugby…
30.11.11 amalgamation, Anyone?
8.11.11 Development contributions
9.8.11 CRITICAL Dunedin City Council meeting
25.7.11 DCC Finance, Strategy and Development Committee – meeting postponed
16.7.11 Major Dunedin City Council infrastructure assets NOT INSURED
7.7.11 More than $1 billion of infrastructure assets NOT insured
23.3.11 Dunedin City Council’s rock and its hard place

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

22 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Doh, low growth for Dunedin

North Dunedin [flickriver.com] re-imaged 3North Dunedin [flickriver.com] re-imaged by whatifdunedin

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Census data tests planning assumptions
By Chris Morris
The Dunedin City Council will review some of the assumptions underpinning its planning efforts, after census data revealed slower-than-expected growth in the city. Council city development manager Dr Anna Johnson yesterday told the Otago Daily Times the city’s growth rate was lower than council planning had anticipated. The city’s resident population had increased from 118,683 in 2006 to 120,246 this year, which equated to annual growth of just 0.19%, she said. That was below 2006 expectations, which had anticipated annual growth of 0.4%, she said. ”The growth is slower than was expected or planned for, and it is lower than the estimates that we have been working with.” There was nothing in the data as yet to suggest the council should change urban development policies included in its spatial plan, which anticipated demand for an extra 7600 residential units in the city by 2031, Dr Johnson said.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
18.8.13 South Dunedin and other low lying areas
12.6.13 Dunedin housing: building up or Brown-like sprawl…
2.4.13 Dunedin: Developers stoop to resource consents instead of…
18.9.12 DCC ‘vision’ (spatial plan chess)
14.4.12 How perverse is the New Zealand housing market?
8.2.12 Dunedin City district plan review
8.12.11 interest.co heats NZ housing debate – listen up
7.12.11 Spatial Plan consultation #Dunedin
1.12.11 Spatial plan “rainbows” – Dunedin
28.10.11 Dunedin’s DRAFT Spatial Plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin City Council meeting (17 Sept)

A meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on Monday, 17 September 2012, in the Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers, at 2.00 PM

Agenda – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 65.0 KB)

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 17.0 MB)
Adoption of Dunedin Towards 2050 A Spatial Plan for Dunedin

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 4.2 MB)
Dunedin’s Economic Development Strategy

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 7.6 MB)
Tourism Dunedin Annual Report 2012

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 113.3 KB)
South Island Strategic Alliance (SISA)

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 195.2 KB)
Otago Wilding Trust

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 48.4 KB)
150th Anniversary of Dunedin Becoming a City

Report – Council – 17/09/2012 (PDF, 214.8 KB)
Modifications to the Committee Structure and Delegations Manual

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Sep 2012
Mayor stays tight-lipped
By Chris Morris
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull is tight-lipped over two items to be considered in private at next week’s Dunedin City Council meeting. The public agenda for Monday’s meeting, released yesterday, listed a “standing orders issue” to be discussed with the public and media excluded. A standing orders issue usually related to a councillor alleged to have broken the council’s code of conduct rules. The second item to be discussed in non-public was listed as a “legal matter”.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

35 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design

Dunedin City district plan review

A report entitled ‘Plan Review and Preparation of Second Generation District Plan’ from the City Development Manager goes to DCC’s Planning and Environment Committee today.

Report Summary:

The Dunedin City District Plan (the Plan) became operative on 3 July 2006. The Planning Policy Team (now part of the City Development Team) have been working on a programme of rolling reviews using section by section Plan evaluations and reviews followed by plan changes to make improvements and deal with any issues identified.

Over the last year and half, City Development have been undertaking an evaluation of most sections of the District Plan to scope the range of “matters” that ideally should be addressed through a plan review and plan change process.

These matters include required responses to changes to the content requirements of plans through amendments to the Resource Management Act 1991, recent National Policy Statements, changes to Regional Plans, the need to improve integration with other Council strategies, alignment with the draft Spatial Plan, provisions in the Plan that internal and external stakeholders feel are not working and major changes in planning ‘best practice’ since the Plan was first written.

The evaluations have recommended that all operative parts of the plan need changes (this excludes Harbourside).

The City Development Team had a workshop with Councillors on 15 March 2010 to discuss the need for a second generation Plan and areas for improvement to be considered in relation to current ‘best practice’.

This report seeks formal approval for the initiation of the plan review and approval to prepare and notify subsequent changes to the Plan to develop a second generation District Plan.

Report – 08/02/2012 (PDF, 100 KB)
Plan Review and Preparation of Second Generation District Plan

[PEC Agenda]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

27 Comments

Filed under DCC, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Politics, Project management, Property, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Urbanismplus report on Central City Framework

The Urbanismplus report on the Central City Framework is now online at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/whats-on/central-city-plan [go to Documents]

A number of the concepts and proposals raised by the consultants in the Central City Framework have been included in the Draft Spatial Plan for public consultation through the submission process.

DCC Draft Spatial Plan Information
Deadline for public submissions: 13/1/2012

Other specific capital projects proposed in the Urbanismplus report are currently being investigated for cost and feasibility.

These will be put forward to Council in January 2012 for consideration towards inclusion in the draft Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP) which will open for public consultation early in the new year.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Politics, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Spatial plan “rainbows” – Dunedin

Dunedin City Council critic Calvin Oaten says the city should turn all its attention to saving itself from bankruptcy rather than spending time, money and resources chasing “spatial plan” rainbows.

### ODT Online Thu, 1 Dec 2011
Opinion
As they say, there are lies, damned lies and statistics
By Calvin Oaten
“A ‘special’ Dunedin is seen in new plan.” So said the headlines covering the presentation of the council’s draft “spatial plan” to about 100 people at a public forum at Forsyth Barr Stadium recently. So what is this plan? “Dunedin Towards 2050 – a Spatial Plan for Dunedin”, sets the strategic direction for Dunedin’s growth and development for the next 30-plus years.
Read more

DCC Draft Spatial Plan Information
Deadline for public submissions: 13/1/2012

Calvin Oaten reminds us about the long forgotten “CHOICES For The Future. Towards 2021” plan devised by DCC, released in 2001, a 20-year outlook:

“Arguably, the most egregious aspect which has driven the plan off course is the fact that Mr Harland, mayor Peter Chin and the council went on a spending spree of unprecedented proportions, commencing in 2004, taking Dunedin’s net debt from $35 million in 2002 to $457.790 million in 2013.”

Mr Harland instigated all work on the draft spatial plan for Dunedin.

Play-shaping, plain and simple.
(refer to comment by ODT Online editor)

Related Posts:
30.11.11 amalgamation, Anyone?
28.10.11 Dunedin’s DRAFT Spatial Plan
21.9.11 John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities
7.6.11 Public Workshop: Dunedin Central City
3.3.11 restorm: Will Wiles attempts to deconstruct…

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Stadiums

The Auckland Plan

It’s the season for spatial plans!

### idealog.co.nz 20 Sep 2011 at 1:40pm
Auckland’s grand plan to build the ‘world’s most liveable city’
By Esther Goh
It’s a tall order, making Auckland’s the ‘world’s most liveable city’ by 2040, but we’ll never know if we don’t try. Mayor Len Brown today launched the draft Auckland Plan, accompanied by plans for the region’s economic development, the city centre and the waterfront, which outline initiatives for urban design and business growth to secure its future as a “globally competitive city”.

The proposals shape options for how JAFAs may live and work, and the transport services they will use. The report sets out five priorities:
• dramatically accelerating the prospects of children and young people
• committing to environmental action and green growth
• outstanding public transport within one network
• radically improving urban living and the built environment
• substantially lifting living standards for all Aucklanders

Click here to have your say on the plan.

Read more

****

ODT Online Tue, 20 Sep 2011
Grand vision for Auckland revealed
Auckland mayor Len Brown has today unveiled his vision to make it the world’s most liveable city by 2040. The 30-year plan looks to create a world-class city centre and waterfront with a city rail link, and to focus on improving education, health and housing. It also sets sets out how Auckland will absorb an additional one million people and build 400,000 houses to accommodate them in the next 30 years. APNZ
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

12 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Oram on Auckland Spatial Plan, and more

### nzstuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/03/2011
Auckland at the crossroads
By Rod Oram – Sunday Star Times
OPINION: The Auckland Plan is a moment of opportunity for the super city.

On Wednesday, a great fight for the heart, soul and wellbeing of Aucklanders begins. But don’t worry. It’s not all about Auckland. If the region gets this right, the rest of the country will benefit strongly from more effective approaches to development. In one corner stands the Auckland Council led by mayor Len Brown. It will present its view of the city’s future when it delivers that day a discussion document on the Auckland Plan. The paper will look at the region in a new way. For the first time, it will bring together data, analysis and insights on the human, economic, environmental, social, cultural and other factors that make Auckland what it is today. Crucially, though, it will use this new analysis to show us options for the region’s future. It’s up to Aucklanders to consider, debate, agree and act with the new powers the region gained through the creation of the super city.

In the other corner stands the Key government, led on these Auckland issues by Rodney Hide, minister of local government. Last week, the cabinet released a set of eight papers giving its very entrenched positions on Auckland’s future. What a miserable view it was. When Hide and his ministerial colleagues think of Auckland they imagine only more of the same, warts and all. In their view, Auckland has to ooze out across the landscape in low-value, low-growth ways.
Read more

aucklandtransportblog critiques Oram on Spatial Plan (21 Mar 2011)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Transportation planning at Dunedin

### ODT Online Mon, 4 Apr 2011
Editorial: Talking about transport needs
Long-term planning, by its very nature, involves the use of the present to predict the future and therefore carries a high risk of inherent failure. When the Dunedin City Council – or any other local body – talks of 50-year plans, it is entering the realm of unpredictability. Global change is occurring at such a rapid pace today that decisions involving commitments beyond even 10 years ahead are fraught with potential pitfalls.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
2.4.11 At last, PRODUCTIVITY is?
31.3.11 Dunedin’s one-way system

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

11 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design

DCC: “Your City/Our Future” Community Engagement Programme

Tabled at Dunedin City Council’s Finance and Strategy Committee Meeting on Monday:

Report – FSC – 21/06/2010 (PDF, 192.9 kb, new window)
“Your City/Our Future” Community Engagement Programme

“It is proposed that the Council’s futures thinking on the City Development Strategy (Spatial Plan), the Sustainability Programme and the Community Outcomes be undertaken in a single co-ordinated programme… This community engagement programme is a key element of the strategic direction for the City and the Council’s agreement is sought to the proposed approach. Councillors will be involved at key stages to provide leadership in reviewing and setting the vision for the city.”

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

8 Comments

Filed under Design, Economics, Geography, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design