Tag Archives: Social networking services

Google crap destroys searchable record

Read this post at Cameron Slater’s blog Whale Oil Beef Hooked.

Whale Oil Beef Hooked logo### whaleoil.co.nz July 5, 2014 at 7:30am
Google’s demise starts here, ctd
By Pete
Not only are Google changing history, they are effectively censoring you, and me, and journalism too. This morning the BBC received the following notification from Google:

Notice of removal from Google Search: we regret to inform you that we are no longer able to show the following pages from your website in response to certain searches on European versions of Google: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/legacy/thereporters/robertpeston/2007/10/merrills_mess.html

What it means is that a blog I wrote in 2007 will no longer be findable when searching on Google in Europe. Which means that to all intents and purposes the article has been removed from the public record, given that Google is the route to information and stories for most people. So why has Google killed this example of my journalism?
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Whale Oil Beef Hooked

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Sunday Star-Times: Judge backs blogger’s fight against fraud

The following is reproduced in the public interest. The Grant Norman King website contains other media references and the Court’s full judgement. –Eds

blogging [andertoons.com] 2

Lawyer Madeleine Flannagan said the judge’s decision showed free speech was alive and well. […] The unique nature of the case, setting a new precedent in harassment laws, meant it was already being used by media law professors at Auckland University.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 25/05/2014
Judge backs blogger’s fight against fraud
By Rob Kidd – Sunday Star-Times
A fraudster’s victim who fought back has won a landmark battle to name and shame the man who scammed him and dozens of others.
Nearly two and a half years ago, Steve Taylor contracted Grant Norman King to build a sleepout for his elderly father behind the family home in West Auckland. Taylor paid three-quarters of the price – $23,500 – as a deposit. The sleepout was never built and the money was not returned.

In a bid to get even, Taylor brought civil proceedings against King but when the cost of continuing the case became prohibitive, he took a different tack, setting up the website grantnormanking.com with the intention of warning others who might be drawn in.

Within months other victims were clamouring to tell their stories and it was not long before Taylor built a comprehensive timeline of King’s offending. King then tried to turn the legal tables on Taylor by using the Harassment Act to sue Taylor and demand the website be taken down. Taylor was forced into Auckland District Court to defend himself. However, that was King’s mistake. “What he did was open up the opportunity for every other victim to tell their story, which was the very thing he was advocating against,” Taylor said. Affidavits in support of Taylor’s cause flooded in and he said it was surreal to be standing in court with the public gallery full of people backing him.

Taylor said more than 70 victims had come forward, across a 32-year span, claiming losses of more than $3 million.

In court Judge David Wilson sided with Taylor and said the website, with all its explosive accusations, could remain online. “It would be inappropriate if a man in Mr King’s position could close down postings of essentially factual material on the basis that it interferes with his commercial plans and deprives him of customers,” the judge said.
Full article

Related Post and Comments
23.5.14 Stadium | DCC Draft Annual Plan 2014/15 ● Benson-Pope asserts himself

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: andertoons.com – blog (detail)

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Filed under Business, Construction, Democracy, Hot air, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Site

Extraordinary editorials

The ODT bellows: “They should be more open.” Their editorial today is a form of tirade directed at the Southern District Health Board (SDHB); with a wrist slap to the University of Otago. The message, however, has sticky parallels.

### ODT Online Fri, 3 Aug 2012
Editorial: Open communication
It is natural organisations want to control news about themselves. They want “good news” to spread and bad news to remain as hidden as possible. No-one wants their dirty linen flapping in the breeze. Thus, public relations firms and communications specialists are paid to develop strategies and to help massage and control information. Of course, it pays to be upfront and open because the consequences of not doing so could well be much worse publicity. Often, public relations advisers will, sensibly, advise openness, recognising the longer-term benefits. But no-one should be fooled into thinking that they are operating for wider altruistic reasons. They are serving their clients or bosses.
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We’re in NO DOUBT the ODT editor has chosen their words very carefully, but in so doing perhaps they should pause to reflect on their own production of what constitutes local news in the Southern Region. We use the plural.

And here’s the thing, it’s hard for the ‘average reader’ to work out who is ‘speaking’ in each of the newspaper’s editorials these days, since there’s a discernible movement and variance of principle, voice and direction, or so it appears.

The anonymity of the editor – or the actions and beliefs of the team producing editorial material – erodes believability and reader confidence; in much the same way as when the newspaper’s ownership comes to bear (do we detect?) on the printed editorial stance.

‘Open communication’ is the headline. It’s something we expect from the independent newspaper, owing to the less than edifying antics and misdeeds that riddle city power structures and business, tied to in-your-face indiscriminate spending of public funds for little or no perceptible public gain.

In an effective democracy, and particularly when public money at stake, however, transparency should be fundamental. Not only does this diminish the opportunity for the cancer of corruption, but it also – as noted last week by the Law Commission in its report on the Official Information Act – promotes accountability. -ODT

ODT itself should be in no doubt that if it wants to play ‘dumb blonde’ or ‘dull brunette’ then the community’s quest for transparency, exposure and lack of newspaper bias will simply change gear – we’ll slip quietly to other news sources for the information we seek, some published, some underground. Motivated people get what they need, where they can. The work-arounds: internet and web sources are all-powerful for constant/instant messaging and exchange of visual data. The underground news economy.

The newspaper – while the physical paper appeals to the eye and hand – is ‘maybe’ something we’ll continue to buy, as a habit. For the most part, Southern news (and morality) is coming to us via social networking services, phone calls and person-to-person meetings – it’s fast and unabridged. People are taking charge of their information sharing. It’s exciting, it’s risky, it works for good and bad. It’s addictive.

We know that lumbering institutions have trouble sending the ‘real news’ by official means – there’s a lot to hide, wheelings, dealings, and slights.

Watch the silence of city councillors. Most are scared of communicating with their constituents by media; god forbid that social media should come between them and their council paychecks or, for some at least, the kickbacks and advantages received from private interests to propel decisions through council committee and departmental processes.

It’s a small world and the Otago Daily Times could adopt a neutral independent newspaper stance to capture most of the undercurrents. Does it? No. Especially not, if when things get too close.

Why are letters to the editor not printed? Why are online comments deleted, rewritten or abridged without explanation on certain topics? Frankly, it’s not all about bad grammar or actionable comments.

Most of the time we’re allowed to read ‘what is safe’, things guaranteed to not upset the Applecart of Order established by the Otago Daily Times in conjunction with (we suspect…) Dunedin City Council and the old boy networks. Intelligent networked people watch for what’s NOT being printed by the patriarchy.

****

The Catholic Bishop of Dunedin has come out as a misogynist… that ODT won’t allow comments at the online post in the interests of widening the debate for female and male subscribers is a sad indictment on the newspaper. Loudly, it shows the inability of All to participate in ‘open communication’ through the newspaper at yet another critical moment for the great ink-blackened unwashed.

Related Post:
28.7.12 Pokie fraud: ODT fails to notice own backyard

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC Media Release – ‘hey, we is networking at last’

Dunedin City Council Media Release
Dunedin City Council Gets Social

The Dunedin City Council has joined social media, establishing a presence on Facebook and Twitter.

Marketing and Communications Agency Manager Debra Simes says the DCC has an official Facebook page – ‘Dunedin City Council’ – for releasing information on consultations, media announcements, upcoming events and other important public information.

It has also established two Twitter feeds that interested people can link to. The first, ‘DnCityCouncil’, will publish the same information as on the Facebook page.

The second, ‘AskDCC’, is a forum for the public to ask operational questions of the DCC’s Customer Services Agency, such as the opening hours of facilities, or how to register a dog.

Using these social media portals will not replace the many other ways the DCC communicates with the public, but is an addition for those who prefer to communicate online.

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

Last reviewed: 30 Aug 2010 2:42pm

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dear DCC: about your services when it floods, when we lose our water supply, our roads wash out, our bridges demolish, usual CD dramas and natural disasters…

PLEASE keep your DCC website home page up to date for citizens, and USE Twitter and Facebook – because your customers use social networking services (aka social media) and we’re connected. Why isn’t DCC connected?

That’s all.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Geography, Media, People, Politics, Project management