Tag Archives: Review

Dunedin City: Representation Review determination

Received.
Friday, April 08, 2016 11:04 AM

From: Donald Riezebos [mailto: Donald.Riezebos @dia.govt.nz]
Sent: Friday, April 08, 2016 10:33 AM
To: Mick Lester (HDC); Belinda Smith Lyttle; Brian Miller; Carissa Cooper; Chalmers Community Board; Colin Weatherall; Geraldine Tait; Leanne Stenhouse; Martin Dillon; Moira Parker; Mosgiel Taieri Community Board; Otago Peninsula Community Board; Saddle Hill Community Board; Strath Taieri Community Board; Sue O’Neill; Te Rauone Beach Coast Care Committee; Waikouaiti Coast Community Board
Subject: Local Government Commission Representation Review Determination – Dunedin City

Attached is a copy of the Local Government Commission’s representation review determination for Dunedin City, along with our media release. These are embargoed until 11.00am at which time the media will be advised.

Regards

Donald Riezebos | Principal Advisor
Local Government Commission Mana Kawanatanga a Rohe

Media Release
8 April 2016

Commission announces decision on representation arrangements for Dunedin City Council

The Local Government Commission today announced its decision on the Dunedin City Council’s membership and ward arrangements for the 2016 local elections.

The Council had proposed that:
• The council be elected at large (rather than from wards)
• The number of councillors remain at 14
• The boundaries of the Chalmers, Otago Peninsula, Saddle Hill and Waikouaiti Coast Community Boards be altered by transferring two areas between communities and excluding other areas from communities altogether
• A Rural Taieri Community Board be established comprising the Strath Taieri Community Board’s area and the rural part of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board’s area

There were 16 appeals against the Council’s proposal.

After hearing from the Council and the appellants the Commission has decided to:
• uphold the Council’s proposal for the Council to be elected at large
• retain the existing community board system (apart from renaming the Chalmers Community Board as the West Harbour Community Board and two boundary alterations).

The boundary alterations are the transfer of an area above Sawyers Bay from Waikouaiti Coast Community to West Harbour Community and the transfer of Quarantine Island from West Harbour Community to Otago Peninsula Community.

The Council’s representation arrangements for the 2016 local elections will therefore be as follows:
• A Mayor and 14 councillors elected from the City as a whole
• Six community boards as follows:

Strath Taieri Community Board
Waikouaiti Coast Community Board
Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board
Saddle Hill Community Board
West Harbour Community Board
Otago Peninsula Community Board

• Each community board will have six members and one councillor appointed to the board by the Council

The determination is available on the Commission’s website: http://www.lgc.govt.nz

Summary of the Representation Review process

Councils are required by law to undertake a representation review every six years. The following is a brief outline of the process:

• The Council makes its proposal
• The Council invites submissions on its proposal
• The Council considers submissions and makes a final proposal
• People can object to or appeal against the proposal to the Local Government Commission
• The Commission may hold an appeals hearing
• The Commission makes and releases its Determination

Ends

Media contacts:
Donald Riezebos | Principal Advisor | Local Government Commission
Simon Cunliffe | Communications Advisor | Local Government Commission

Downloads:
4549539DA – Blank Document [Determination 7.4.16]
Dunedin City – Media Release

Related Post and Comments:
11.6.15 DCC representation review

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

33 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Dunedin, Economics, Geography, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Resource management

DCC representation review

Updated post Thu, 11 Jun 2015 at 11:10 p.m.

DCClogo_landscape (1)

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Representation Review Report Released

This item was published on 10 Jun 2015

The Representation Review Team has completed its review and will discuss its findings with the Dunedin City Council at an extraordinary Council meeting on Monday.

The independent panel reviewed the Council’s representation arrangements after hearing people’s views on the structure we have for electing representatives, whether we have the right number of Councillors and how our wards and community boards meet the needs of our communities.

The Representation Review Team’s recommendations include that the Council be elected at large (which means there would no longer be wards and Councillors would be voted for by all residents) and that the number of Councillors remains at 14.

The Review Team recommends several changes to community boards, such as establishing a Rural Community Board to cover the Strath Taieri and Taieri rural communities. It recommends adjusting the boundaries of Chalmers, Otago Peninsula, Saddle Hill and Waikouaiti Coast Community Boards and reducing the number of elected members on each community board from six to four. The Council would continue to appoint a Councillor to each board. 

Review Team Chair Associate Professor Janine Hayward says, “The Review Team is grateful to everyone who participated in this process. We heard from many people from all parts of Dunedin with a wide range of views and perspectives. It is heartening to see how highly people value our local democracy. We encourage everyone to continue to participate in the next phase of consultation also.”

Members of the Review Team will be present at Monday’s meeting to discuss their recommendations with the Council, which will then agree on a proposal that will go out for public consultation.

Councils are required by law to look at their representation arrangements on a regular basis.

The other Review Team members are Len Cook, Paulette Tamati-Elliffe and Mayor Dave Cull.

Report – Council – 15/06/2015 (PDF, 8.6 MB)

Report – Council – 15/06/2015 – low resolution (PDF, 1.9 MB)

Contact Associate Professor Janine Hayward, Representation Review Team Chair on 03 479 8666.

DCC Link

### ODT Online Thu, 11 Jun 2015
Wards’ abolition proposed
By Shawn McAvinue
Dunedin city’s three wards should be abolished and council candidates should vie for the votes of every resident, a team including Mayor Dave Cull has recommended. Under the plan, the number of community boards would be cut from six to five, with fewer members on each board.
Read more

Is this really the end of the Mosgiel Taieri Community Board ?? The board with the mostest…. conflicts of interest, and greatest propensity to misuse city council grants ?? HAPPY DAYS.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

88 Comments

Filed under DCC, Democracy, Economics, Fun, Geography, LGNZ, Media, New Zealand, People, Politics, What stadium

DCC seeks feedback on representation arrangements

DCC mayor and councillors (2013-14) 1

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Feedback Sought on Local Government Representation

This item was published on 02 Apr 2015

An independent panel is reviewing the Dunedin City Council’s representation arrangements and wants to know what residents think.

The Representation Review Team is keen to know people’s views on the structure we have for electing representatives, whether we have the right number of councillors and how our wards and community boards meet the needs of our communities. It also asks whether we need guaranteed Māori representation and how we can encourage more people to vote in local elections.

Review Team Chair Associate Professor Janine Hayward says, “The review is an exciting opportunity to think about how the current representation arrangements are working for Dunedin residents. We look forward to hearing from as many people as possible.”

The DCC is made up of 14 councillors and a mayor. The mayor is voted for by all Dunedin residents while 11 councillors are elected by Central Ward residents, two are elected by Mosgiel Taieri residents and one is elected by residents in the Waikouaiti Coast-Chalmers Ward. Under this structure one councillor represents 8,869 residents.

The DCC also has six community boards, elected by their communities. In total, these boards represent a third of Dunedin’s population.

Councils are required by law to look at their representation arrangements on a regular basis. The Review Team has been meeting with community boards and other groups and also wants to hear from the public.

█ Residents are encouraged to fill in a short feedback form, which is available at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/represent, or pick up a printed form from the DCC Customer Services Agency in the Civic Centre or from Dunedin Public Libraries and service centres. Feedback is due by 30 April.

█ There will also be a public meeting in the Dunningham Suite, City Library, at 7pm on Monday, 20 April where people are welcome to ask questions and pass on their views.

Public feedback will help the Review Team make recommendations to the Council in June/July. Formal public consultation will be held later in the year on a proposed structure to apply for the 2016 local elections.

The other Review Team members are Len Cook, Paulette Tamati-Elliffe and Mayor Dave Cull. Contact DCC on 477 4000.

DCC Link

2013 MAPS
Waikouaiti Coast-Chalmers Ward Boundary map
Mosgiel Taieri Ward Boundary map
Central Ward Boundary Map

2013 Waikouaiti Coast-Chalmers Ward Boundary map2013 Mosgiel Taieri Ward Boundary map2013 Central Ward Boundary Map

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

18 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Stadium: No 4 at interest.co.nz

Link received from Martin Legge
Monday, 27 January 2014 11:44 a.m.

### interest.co.nz January 27, 2014 at 10:30am
Opinion
Monday’s Top 10: New view on mobility; Dunedin’s problem; multinationals and climate change; end of low rents; gold’s odd demand/price setting; Dilbert, and more
Posted by David Chaston
Here’s my edition of Top 10 links from around the Internet at 11:00 am today. We now have a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule for Top 10.

interest.co.nz 27.1.14 [screenshot] [screenshot – click to enlarge]

Interest Link

The Press 28.6.13 Uncovered stadium possible, Parker says

Related Posts and Comments:
25.1.14 Stadium: Some helped it along, or themselves!
24.1.14 Stadium: It came to pass . . .

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

24 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, DCHL, Design, DVL, DVML, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Stadium: It came to pass . . .

A rather short-term vision, it turns out, Forsyth Barr Stadium was pitched as a multi-purpose stadium for Dunedin —a necessary investment in the future of the city. At various stages of development the building was also known as Dunedin Stadium, Awatea Street Stadium, New Carisbrook, or its non-commercial official name during the 2011 Rugby World Cup, Otago Stadium. Colloquially, it’s ‘The Glasshouse’, given the resemblance to a horticultural hot house.

The glasshouse-fubar though, has bred of itself a bloated money-sucking monster for DCC, ratepayers, and residents. For accountability and transparency, need we ask if fumigation and sterilisation are enough to eradicate white collar aphids and fungal rorting?

But what happens if the wilting irreparable (no maintenance budget…) stadium also has rugby tests forcibly ‘removed’? Too late, already happened. Bring in the moths, or more of the hopeless ratepayer subsidies?

You want to know how the ‘private th-robbing vision’ of St Farry of Saint Clair (now Queenstown) can possibly be re-envisioned against mountainous council debt? Well, what about recouping lost millions from the stadium’s privateering progenitors?

With yesterday’s dose of “antiseptic sunshine” from DCC chief executive Sue Bidrose (also administered beforehand as DCC quietly mustered its forces) the community stands a good chance to end seven years or more of serial manipulation as the council gullibly, knowingly or otherwise takes the worst ride of its corporate and financial history.

The review of Forsyth Barr Stadium will encompass the entire operating model, from the company operating structure to the way the stadium is run on the ground —done in conjunction with Dunedin Venues Ltd, the parent company, Dunedin Venues Management Ltd, which operates the stadium, and the council’s holding company.

The review will be presented to council mid year, if not sooner, and be accompanied by OPTIONS.

Sue Bidrose CE [dunedintv.co.nz] 3The abrupt announcement of the pending review by council chief executive Sue Bidrose at the Draft Annual Plan 2014/15 meeting yesterday was no doubt astonishing to many present. It showed considerable strength, intelligence and temerity on her part —here is, “good leadership”. As we consider the implications and all facets of what the investigation can begin to reveal, Sue Bidrose should understand that she is supported both from inside and outside this council. There’s agency ‘around about’ geared to elicit information the council isn’t in a position to gather itself.

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### ODT Online Thu, 23 Jan 2014
Review as council seeks stadium solution
By Debbie Porteous
The Dunedin City Council is to do a fundamental review of the operating and funding models of the Forsyth Barr Stadium, which continues to be unable to meet its budget. Chief Executive Sue Bidrose informed the council this morning that she had instigated the review as it became increasingly obvious the original model for running the stadium, which was set up to suggest the stadium could pay its own way, was “fundamentally optimistic”.
Read more

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### dunedintv.co.nz January 23, 2014 – 7:23pm
Full review of Forsyth Barr Stadium’s finances to be undertaken
By David Loughrey
The DCC is about to undertake what its chief executive has called a complete and fundamental review of the Forsyth Barr Stadium’s finances. The unexpected announcement came early in the piece, as the council sat to consider its next year’s budget. And ratepayers wary of more of their money heading towards the stadium will be disappointed to hear the review itself will cost them.
Video

Bev Butler [dunedintv.co.nz]

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### radionz.co.nz Updated about 1 hour ago
RNZ News
Reporting by Ian Telfer
Dunedin stadium facing review
The Dunedin City Council says the South Island city’s struggling stadium is being reviewed because it will never make money the way it is run. The announcement was made by the council’s new chief executive, Sue Bidrose, at the start of annual budget setting meetings on Thursday morning.
The $230 million stadium opened in 2011 to replace the Carisbrook ground, but controversy has continued over its construction costs and resulting council debt.
Dr Bidrose said it had become increasingly obvious that the existing model set up to manage and operate the stadium and its finances was broken. She said the stadium’s original budgets were too optimistic and it would never be able to raise the $9 million needed to break even. This year, it has a funding gap of $100,000 or $200,000 and the problem will get worse without a better structure.
Dr Bidrose said some point there has to be a trigger to make a change – and that point is now. The full review will look at everything and put everything possible into the public domain.
A leading opponent of the stadium says she knew it would never pay its way. Bev Butler, the former president of the Stop the Stadium group, says the review vindicates her work. “This is what the debate was about. This is where there were hundreds and hundreds of submissons – high quality submissions telling the council that this is what the peer reviews said and the council ignored it.” Ms Butler says she expects the council will one day have to mothball the stadium because the city cannot afford to run it.
RNZ Link

Radio NZ National – Checkpoint
Dunedin’s stadium would never pay its way, full review ordered
Reporting by Ian Telfer
17:23 It’s been revealed Dunedin’s 230-million-dollar stadium will never pay its way, prompting the city council to order a full ground-up review, including looking at privatising it.
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (3:01 )

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: dunedintv.co.nz – Sue Bidrose re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

147 Comments

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“Snow on the roof was probably heavier than the design loads”

A visual examination suggested remedial welding was not up to standard.

### ODT Online Fri, 10 Dec 2010
Worksmanship blamed for stadium roof collapse
Inadequate workmanship, the low expectations of the old building code, and unusually heavy snow contributed to the collapse and ultimate destruction of Stadium Southland, the findings of an independent review committee say . . . They recommend plans for the new stadium be peer reviewed before construction and that it is accompanied by a quality control programme, but steer clear of apportioning blame or establishing the legal responsibility.

Insurer NZI and the Department of Building and Housing are also investigating the collapse, and the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research is preparing a report on the snowfall.

Read more

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

10 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, People, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums