Tag Archives: REVENUE

RNZ Morning Report: Damning indictment of Aurora Energy #Listen

Aurora Energy has not maintained the lines utility because for years the company passed over lines profits in the form of dividends to DCC and subvention payments to cover Stadium debt servicing. Central Otago power users faced silly-huge increases in their lines charges. Otago power users, generally, having already paid for upgrades and renewals through their lines charges, have regrettably lost their safe and secure supply of electricity, and must now pay twice. The people responsible for this critical state of affairs need to explain and face the consequences.

How does this stack up for the Commerce Commission, the industry regulator ?

### rnz.co.nz Mon 12 Jun 2017
Morning Report with Guyon Espiner and Susie Ferguson
8:47 AM Many electric lines companies have outdated equipment -ComCom Link
A report by the Commerce Commission says many electric lines companies have outdated equipment that should have been replaced years ago. Our reporter Eric Frykberg has been looking into it.
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (3′29″)

****

Commerce Commission New Zealand
Media Release 9 June 2017

The Commerce Commission has published one-page summaries of key performance measures for each of New Zealand’s 29 electricity lines companies.
The summaries are designed to promote a better understanding of each lines company’s performance by providing high-level statistics such as profitability, capital and operating expenditure, asset condition, revenue and network reliability.
Commissioner Dr Stephen Gale said that the Commission has pulled together the data to make it easily accessible for industry, Government agencies and consumers, and to enable comparison across lines companies. The statistics are sourced from more detailed public disclosures.
“Electricity companies reach every New Zealand household and business so over time we want to make it easier for consumers to understand how their own lines company is performing year-on-year. The information in the summaries is still quite technical in nature, but we expect this kind of exposure will in itself help improve lines companies’ overall performance,” Dr Gale said.
“The summaries are a high-level snapshot of the lines companies and are not intended to represent a thoroughly detailed picture of performance. However, they suggest some differences between the performances of different lines companies, such as the health of assets including poles, lines and substation equipment. In cases of apparent poor performance, we will follow up with the companies to better understand their circumstances. We will also undertake further analysis in the future.”
The performance summaries are available on the Commission’s website.

****

Performance summaries for electricity distributors
Under Part 4 of the Commerce Act these 29 electricity distributors are required to publicly disclose information to help people better understand how the sector is performing.

Click areas on the [interactive map at the ComCom website] to download the distributors’ 2016 performance summaries.

[screenshot only]

The performance summaries provide high level statistics on each lines companies’ performance, including measures such as profitability, capital and operating expenditure, asset condition, line charge revenue and network reliability.

See more details in the documents below.
← Back to Performance analysis and data for distributors

Documents
Explanatory notes for electricity distributors’ performance summaries – May 2017
(PDF, 464 KB) Published on 31 May 2017

Total electricity distribution 2016 – June 2017
(PDF, 488 KB) Published on 06 June 2017

Performance summaries for electricity distributors – May 2017
(MS Excel Spreadsheet, 2.1 MB) Published on 31 May 2017

****

[screenshot, details]

Aurora Energy 2016 One Page summary

█ View Online: http://www.comcom.govt.nz/assets/Downloads/Aurora-Energy-2016-one-page-summary.pdf

█ For more, enter the terms *aurora*, delta*, *poles*, *healey* or *dchl* in the search box at right.

Disclaimer. The site owner is not responsible for the currency or accuracy of content of contributed comments; and the inclusion of the information provided does not imply endorsement by the site owner.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

17 Comments

Filed under Aurora Energy, Business, Central Otago, Commerce Commission, Construction, DCC, DCHL, Delta, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Electricity, Finance, Geography, Health & Safety, Hot air, Infrastructure, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Perversion, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Public interest, Queenstown Lakes, Resource management, SFO, Stadiums, Structural engineering, Technology, Tourism, Town planning, Travesty, Urban design

Reminder to DVML | Annual cost for Stadium stings renters ratepayers $25M

16.12.15 ODT: Concerts a $20m bonus
International promoters are eyeing Dunedin for regular sell-out concerts after Forsyth Barr Stadium delivered strong ticket sales and a nearly $20 million boost to the city’s economy […] DVML chief executive Terry Davies said the results showed the stadium was delivering on “two key drivers” – delivering economic benefits and a boost to the city’s pride.
http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/367093/concerts-20m-bonus

Comment at ODT Online:

Stadium economic dis-benefit
Submitted by JimmyJones on Mon, 21/12/2015 – 8:15pm.

DVML claims an economic benefit to Dunedin of $19.7 million for the concerts held this year. Economic benefit figures are notoriously exaggerated, especially when they are provided by someone whose reputation is at stake.

Anyway, it is misleading to claim a $20 million boost to the Dunedin economy without mentioning the annual $25 million (aprox.) cost to renters and ratepayers to fund the stadium. This is a net drain on the local economy and something Mr Davies and Mayor Cull should be ashamed of.

Also, almost none of the citizens forced to pay for this financial disaster receive any financial benefit from this so-called economic benefit – this is a wealth transfer, with a few businesses benefiting greatly at the expense of all the citizens of the city – the many suffer, to benefit the few. On the whole the stadium continues to be a millstone around the neck of Dunedin’s economy.

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

projectimagestreamstadium2-ashxForsyth_Barr_Stadium_ ETFE_Roof_5 of 6

*Images: fubar stadium, Dunedin

5 Comments

Filed under Business, Concerts, Construction, CST, DCC, Democracy, Dunedin, DVL, DVML, Economics, Events, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZRU, OAG, Ombudsman, ORFU, People, Perversion, Politics, Project management, Property, Sport, Stadiums, Travesty

DCC operating deficit $1M worse than budget

### dunedintv.co.nz Mon, 16 Nov 2015
DCC earnings below budget
The city council’s heading into Christmas with less money in its accounts than budgeted. Its latest financials have been revealed in a report to councillors. Revenue is down by half a million dollars compared to budget, as at the end of September. The council’s also made less money than expected on its Waipori Fund investments, and has received less funding. Energy costs have also been higher than anticipated. The operating deficit for the three months to September was almost a million dollars worse than budget.
Ch39 Link [no video available]

DCC Finance Committee met this afternoon, with the following agenda and reports tabled. There were no minutes for confirmation.

Agenda – FIN – 16/11/2015 (PDF, 19.3 KB)

Report – FIN – 16/11/2015 (PDF, 755.6 KB)
Financial Result – Period Ended 30 September 2015

Report – FIN – 16/11/2015 (PDF, 86.9 KB)
Development Contributions Assessments 2014/15

The Economic Development Committee met immediately prior to the Finance meeting. Four reports from Enterprise Dunedin were tabled.
Refer to DCC website for this information.

DEVIOUSLY with not much public notice a full Council meeting also took place today. You can see by the agenda items why this one was rushed through quietly in preamble.

Agenda – Council – 16/11/2015 (PDF, 21.3 KB)

Report – Council – 16/11/2015 (PDF, 91.3 KB)
Refugee Settlement in Dunedin

████ Report – Council – 16/11/2015 (PDF, 91.3 KB)
Appointment of Independent Commissioners to the Proposed Dunedin City Council District Plan Hearings Panel – Te Paepae Kaiwawao Motuhake O Te 2GP

█ The public has until November 24 to make submissions.

2GP banner

█ Proposed Second Generation District Plan (2GP)
https://2gp.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp/index.html

[from the report, note the maori-isation under Cull’s steer]
JOKE – meaning there was NO NEED at all for Councillor appointments
18 expressions of interest were received by the deadline of 5pm on Monday 19 October 2015. One expression of interest was submitted a week after this deadline. This was excluded from consideration on the basis that the reasons for lateness were not sufficient to warrant an exception being granted.

DOUBLE TRIPLE JOKE
In accordance with the delegation from Council, the Chief Executive formed an evaluation panel to review the expressions of interest submitted. The Panel comprised: Chief Executive, Sue Bidrose; General Manager of Services and Development, Simon Pickford; City Development Manager, Anna Johnson; a Probity Officer (Group Manager Corporate Services, Sandy Graham) was appointed to oversee and document the completion of each evaluation step and ensure the process was fair and transparent. HAHAHAHA

BUT WAIT
The candidates that were ranked the highest had:
• A planning qualification or full NZPI membership
• A wide-ranging experience in planning practice (as a commissioner or practitioner), having worked in a number of areas of planning and for a variety of local authorities
• Significant experience as a commissioner hearing plan changes, and direct experience of the planning issues likely to emerge from the 2GP.

In addition to assessing the candidates on their experience, the highest ranked candidates were contacted to ensure any conflicts of interests could be adequately managed, and reference checks were undertaken.

[squeak] Finally, candidates’ appreciation and knowledge of iwi values and protocols and experience with topics related to natural hazards or other risk-based issues were considered.

Six candidates scored at a level to appoint them to the Hearings Panel. The candidates’ rankings are set out in Attachment A [NOT PROVIDED] to this report. The expressions of interest from all six candidates suitable for appointment are included in Attachment B [NOT PROVIDED]. The full list of the expressions of interest submitted is set out in Attachment C [NOT PROVIDED].

As a result of the ranking exercise, it is recommended that Council appoint the two highest scoring candidates for the membership of the Hearings Panel, and a further member from the candidates ranked second equal.

Remuneration will be negotiated by the Chief Executive and management plans for any conflicts of interest will also be set at this time.

████ Elected members should note that the Council received objections in relation to its decision to appoint elected members to the Hearings Panel, indicating that there is a degree of public interest in the Council’s decision on the selection of decision makers for this process.

Related Posts and Comments:
● 11.11.15 Letter to DCC chief executive re extension for public submissions…
● 9.11.15 Letter to DCC chief executive re Proposed 2GP hearings panel
24.10.15 DCC and the AWFUL 2GP ‘threat of THREATS’
12.10.15 DCC Proposed 2GP (district plan) —DEFEND YOUR PROPERTY
3.10.15 DCC: Public Notice Draft 2GP + “Community Presentations”
3.10.15 DCC appointees to draft 2GP panel #greenasgrass #infatuation
● 2.10.15 DCC Draft 2GP hearings panel lacks FULL INDEPENDENCE
30.10.15 DCC 2GP molasses and the dreadful shooflies (You)
● 28.9.15 Message to DCC: The People can’t deal with your 2GP documentation…
26.9.15 DCC: Proposed 2GP to line pockets of cowboy developers #FIGHTDIRTY

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

7 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, District Plan, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Resource management, What stadium

Southern complainants: IPCA won’t ensure upfront investigation #politics

The Police have joined both the Charities Commission and the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) in picking off low hanging fruit to justify their existence. There’s no mongrel in the public service any more and all they want is the easy life. It’s why the Police love traffic enforcement, particularly speed and drink driving – so instant, so easy and oh so profitable. –Anonymous

police-generic-1200-A [3news.co.nz]

Southern police officers were investigated for a range of complaints, including failure to investigate, attitude/language, and inadequate service.

### ODT Online 9:20 AM Sunday Jan 11, 2015
Dozens of police faced disciplinary procedures
By Hamish McNeilly
Complaints about bad language and bullying are just some of the reasons for disciplinary actions against some Southern district police officers. Figures released to the Otago Daily Times show dozens of southern officers have been involved in disciplinary action over the past five years, with 12 officers resigning.
Read more

IPCA: “It’s our job to keep watch over Police” !!!!

Independent Police Conduct Authority of New Zealand
Sometimes incorrectly referred to as the Independent Police Complaints Authority. The Independent Police Conduct Authority is an independent body that considers complaints against New Zealand Police and oversees their conduct. http://ipca.govt.nz/

IPCA Role and powers
The Authority has the following functions and powers under the Independent Police Conduct Authority Act 1988.
Functions: Under section 12 of the Independent Police Conduct Authority Act 1988, the Authority’s functions are to:
● receive complaints (i) alleging misconduct or neglect of duty by any member of Police or (ii) concerning any Police practice, policy or procedure affecting a complainant; or
● investigate incidents in which a member of Police (acting in the execution of his or her duty) causes or appears to have caused death or serious bodily harm.
Action on complaints: Under the Act, when the Authority receives a complaint, it may carry out its own investigation, or refer the matter to the Police for investigation under the Authority’s oversight. If a complaint is referred to the Police for investigation, the Authority will take steps to ensure that it is properly resolved. This may include directing or actively overseeing the Police investigation, or reviewing or auditing the Police investigation once it is completed. The Authority may also decline to take action on a complaint – for example, if the complaint is very minor or outside the Authority’s jurisdiction. The Authority’s powers in relation to complaints are set out in section 17 and section 19 of the Act. Read more

IPCA Vision and values
The Authority’s mission is to promote public trust and confidence in New Zealand Police. […] The Authority’s values include independence, trustworthiness, accountability, vigilance, and integrity. The Authority exists to support public expectations – as expressed by Parliament – for the justice system to be trusted and effective.
Outcomes: The Authority is funded through Vote: Justice and contributes to the overall justice sector outcome ‘A safe and just society’ and to the following three justice sector goals: accessible justice services, effective constitutional arrangements, and trusted justice system. The work done by the Authority also contributes to Police outcomes of ‘Confident, safe and secure communities’ and ‘Organisational development’, and Police values of integrity and professionalism as outlined in the Police Statement of Intent 2008/09. Read more

IPCA Accountability
The Authority is an independent Crown entity, which means it is accountable to Parliament for its use of taxpayer funding. The Authority is independent in its day-to-day operations. It cannot be told how to handle an investigation, or what the outcome of any investigation should be. However, the Authority is taxpayer-funded and it must account to the responsible Minister and to Parliament for its use of those funds. Read more

IPCA Independence
The Independent Police Conduct Authority is fully independent – it is not part of the Police. ‘Independence’ means that the Authority makes its findings based on the facts and the law. It does not answer to the Police or anyone else over those findings. In this way, its independence is similar to that of a Court. There are three aspects to the Authority’s independence: Legislative independence, Operational independence, and The perception of independence. Read more

The Independent Police Conduct Authority (IPCA) was established in November 2007, replacing the Police Complaints Authority.
The Police Complaints Authority had been established in 1989, following several years of debate about Police accountability, sparked in part by the role of Police during the 1981 Springbok Tour. Prior to 1989, complaints against the Police were investigated internally. Through most of its life, the Police Complaints Authority comprised a single person with a small number of support staff conducting reviews of Police investigations. Because of its reliance on Police investigations, the Authority was perceived as lacking independence. Recent changes, including the appointment of independent investigators, are addressing that perception.
Key milestones in the history of the Police Complaints Authority include:
● the October 2000 Review of the Police Complaints Authority by Sir Rodney Gallen, who recommended the appointment of independent investigators;
● the appointment in late 2003 of the first independent investigators;
● the March 2007 report of the Commission of Inquiry into Police Conduct, which recommended a number of changes to the Authority, including enhanced powers and improved communication with complainants;
● the Independent Police Conduct Authority Amendment Act 2007, which changed the Authority’s name and made changes to the Authority’s powers.
The period since the establishment of the Independent Police Conduct Authority in November 2007 has been one of transformation, as the Authority shifts its focus towards independent and transparent investigation of the most serious incidents and complaints. This period of change has included the appointment of additional investigators, and changes to the Authority’s legislation, structure and operations.
[IPCA History] Read more

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 10:00 10/01/2015
‘Zero tolerance’ policy should be scrapped
By Duncan Garner
OPINION Police like to roll out statistics when it suits them so here’s one that hurts – 17 people killed on the roads during the holiday period. That’s more than double the death toll compared with last year. And it’s despite the police’s misguided efforts to target speeding drivers with the hopelessly designed zero tolerance for speeding campaign. It’s a campaign that has utterly failed. It’s a stupid policy that needs to be scrapped. Hundreds of thousands of us will have broken the zero tolerance policy over the holidays. Good on you. I did. It was safer to do so.
Read more

****

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00, January 11 2015
Uber taxi battle sees police vs cabbies
By Shabnam Dastgheib and Marika Hill
Police are cracking down on Uber, the cheap and trendy new-kid-on-the-taxi rank, leaving paying customers on the pavement. After complaints from the old-school taxi firms, police have begun fining the Uber drivers whose lower fares have been hurting the big cab companies. The private car hire service has hit back, lodging a complaint of police harassment with the Independent Police Complaints (sic) Authority. Uber operates as a private hire service which means the fare has to be set at the time of booking, rather than using a meter. This means Uber does not have to abide by taxi regulations, thus saving on operating costs.
Read more

Citifleet —Related Posts and Comments:
3.1.15 DCC: Street talk NEVER HAPPENED
25.12.14 Daaave stole Christmas from #DUD
● 24.12.14 Dunedin: Watching the detectives
23.12.14 Our Leaders: if commonalities
● 19.12.14 DCC: Limited Citifleet investigation about insurance
19.12.14 Vandervis: Deloitte and Police Citifleet investigations
19.12.14 DCC Citifleet by email . . . . woops! (another timeline proof)
18.12.14 DCC: Deloitte report released on Citifleet #whitewash
24.10.14 DCC Citifleet, more revelations….
21.10.14 DCC Citifleet, undetectable….

Otago Rugby —For more information, enter the terms *orfu*, *rugby*, *racing*, *pokies*, *auditor-general*, *audit nz*, *dia*, *oag*, *sfo*, *operation chestnut* and *whistleblower* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: 3news.co.nz – police generic

21 Comments

Filed under Business, Democracy, DIA, Economics, Media, New Zealand, NZRU, OAG, ORFU, People, Police, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, Site, Sport

Darren Burden plays LGOIMA game like Davies #DVML #PsychoAnswer

DVML’s attempts to deceive ratepayers continues under Burden’s control. Mayor Dull is fully complicit.

### ODT Wed, 10 Oct 2012
Letters to the editor (page 8)
Concern over attendance of rugby games
Recent national news stories regarding widespread concern over the NZRU’s ITM Cup competition, which report that the number of spectators are down in significant numbers, along with reduced ratings on Sky TV for their coverage of these matches, lead to some financial concerns for Dunedin ratepayers.
Can Darren Burden, chief executive of DVML who runs and manages the stadium used for these professional rugby matches, confirm that:
1. The average attendance at these matches at the Forsyth Barr Stadium is in the region of 5000.
2. The average ticket price for these 5000 attendees is approximately $20.
3. The gross income from ticket sales is, therefore, approximately $100,000.
4. The NZRU returns approximately 10% of gate sales revenue to the venue operator.
5. The income to DVML from gate sales is, therefore, approximately $10,000.
6. The cost of opening the stadium for a professional rugby match is approximately $100,000.
7. These matches held at the stadium therefore lose approximately $90,000 each time they are held.
If Mr Burden disputes these figures, can he supply in detail his version of the above statements, as well as an accurate profit/loss statement for the ITM matches held at the stadium?

Russell Garbutt
Wakari

[Dunedin Venues chief executive Darren Burden replies: “The ITM Cup provides variety and entertainment to our event schedule and has value to the stadium beyond just financial. The cost of opening the stadium varies depending on the size of the event. However, it is nowhere near $100,000 for an ITM cup match, as suggested. The information requested by Mr Garbutt is complex. I invite him to contact Dunedin Venues directly and we’ll happily review his request for information.”]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

30 Comments

Filed under Business, DVML, Economics, Events, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums

Deloitte ‘State of the Unions’ report

Download Deloitte Rugby Union Sports Review 2012 (PDF, 682.12 KB)

Deloitte
Media Release

July 31, 2012

Community participation and support crucial to sustainability of Rugby Unions

Deloitte ‘State of the Unions’ report highlights decline in provincial rugby unions’ revenues

Community participation and support are crucial to the on-going viability of the country’s provincial rugby unions and the continued success of the nation’s favourite game at the highest levels, according to a Deloitte Sports Review released today.

The ‘State of the Unions’ Deloitte Sports Review examines the annual financial accounts over the last five years of the 14 semi-professional and amateur rugby unions competing in the ITM cup. It shows that collectively revenues are falling and reserves are being eroded, potentially threatening the future success of the game in New Zealand.

Revenue earned by the 14 rugby unions competing in the ITM Cup (excluding the professional rugby franchises competing in Super Rugby) dropped 11% from $77 million in 2010 to $68 million in 2011. This is 19% down on the $84 million earned five years ago.

On average, over two-thirds of total revenues in 2011 were from grants and sponsorships from the New Zealand Rugby Union (NZRU), the corporate sector and others. The remaining revenue streams for the unions include match related revenues, retail sales, event management and other sundry incomes.

Of particular concern is the decline in match related revenues, which include gate takings and hospitality. This revenue has fallen 58% in the past five years from $21 million to $9 million, accounting for the lion’s share of the total $16 million decline in revenues.

However, Deloitte partner Grant Jarrold said there are signs unions are working harder to contain costs in a difficult environment and have made some progress in turning the financial picture around. Only five of the 14 ITM Cup unions posted profits in 2010 with this improving to nine unions in 2011 and the combined deficit falling from $2.3m to $630,000 over the same period.

Mr Jarrold added that the large corporate sponsorships and other grants that have filtered into the grass roots game in the past can no longer be relied upon in the current commercial climate.

“Now more than ever, the unions need to look for innovative ways to build community support and encourage increased attendance to reverse the worrying trend of declining match related revenues. Otherwise changes to the structure of the game in this country will become inevitable,” says Mr Jarrold.

He points to the fact that a relatively small increase of 500 spectators paying an average price of $20 per ticket at each of the regular season games of the ITM Cup would have eliminated the combined net deficit in 2011 with all other things being equal.

“The importance that our provincial rugby unions hold for the on-going success of our national team should not be forgotten as they are responsible for fostering the development of the game and its players throughout New Zealand,” Mr Jarrold concludes.

The full State of the Unions Deloitte Sports Review can be found at www.deloitte.com/nz/stateoftheunions.

For more information, contact:

Matt Huntington
Communications Manager
Deloitte
DDI: 04 470 3771
Mob: 021 812 210
email: mhuntington@deloitte.co.nz

www.deloitte.com/nz/about

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Economics, Name, People, Sport