Tag Archives: Retail

Shopping Malls – United States

Thanks to wirehunt for this link.

### theatlanticcities.com Jul 13, 2012
Urban Wonk
The Shopping Mall Turns 60 (and Prepares to Retire)
By Emily Badger
The enclosed suburban shopping mall has become so synonymous with the American landscape that it’s hard to imagine the original idea for it ever springing from some particular person’s imagination. Now the scheme seems obvious: of course Americans want to amble indoors in a million square feet of air-conditioned retail, of course we will need a food court because so much shopping can’t be done without meal breaks, and of course we will require 10,000 parking spaces ringing the whole thing to accommodate all our cars. The classic indoor mall, however, is widely credited with having an inventor. And when the Vienna-born architect Victor Gruen first outlined his vision for it in a 1952 article in the magazine Progressive Architecture, the plan was a shocker. Most Americans were still shopping downtown, and suburban “shopping centers”, to the extent they existed, were most definitely not enclosed in indoor mega-destinations.

At the mall’s peak popularity, in 1990, America opened 19 of them. But we haven’t cut the ribbon on a new one since 2006.

Gruen’s idea transformed American consumption patterns and much of the environment around us. At age 60, however, the enclosed regional shopping mall also appears to be an idea that has run its course (OK, maybe not in China, but among Gruen’s original clientele). He opened the first prototype in Edina, Minnesota, in 1956, and the concept spread from there (this also means the earliest examples of the archetypal American mall are now of age for historic designation, if anyone wants to make that argument).
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● Emily Badger is a contributing writer to The Atlantic Cities. She also writes for Pacific Standard, and her work has appeared in GOOD, The Christian Science Monitor, and The New York Times. She lives in the Washington, D.C. area.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southdale_Center

Southdale (b.1956) two overlays – WAI Architecture Think Tank

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Has DCC Planning lost the plot AGAIN?

### ODT Online Wed, 13 Jul 2011
Call to reject retail development
By Chris Morris
Plans for a multimillion-dollar Green Island retail development should be rejected to help protect Dunedin’s main street experience from a “death by a thousand cuts”, a Dunedin City Council planner says. Irmo Properties Ltd has applied for resource consent to refurbish the rundown Iron Roller Mills Building on Irmo St, Green Island, turning it into a new 4900sq m retail complex with 187 car parks.
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Comment by Barch67 at ODT Online:
If the developer were to re-name it “The Rugby World Cup Retail Development”, it’d be consented by now.
Link

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Dunedin’s industrial heritage, the greater hope!

Very encouraging signs from the developer.

Green Island resident Graham Roper said it was “really positive” community concerns appeared to have been listened to, and he looked forward to “working with them on a project that will enhance the community”.

### ODT Online Fri, 29 Apr 2011
Green Island retail plans win support
By Chris Morris
Plans for a Green Island retail development which could transform one of Dunedin’s industrial heritage sites have won initial support from a critic and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. Irmo Properties Ltd has applied for resource consent to refurbish the run-down Iron Roller Mills Building on Irmo St, in Green Island, turning it into a new 4900sq m retail complex with 187 car parks. If approved by the Dunedin City Council, the up-to-$2 million development would see the main industrial building on the site – believed to date from between 1910 and the late 1920s – refurbished. The developers and supporters hope many of its fittings can be retained.

It was one of many industrial heritage sites around Dunedin, iron rolling having played a “pretty important” part in the city’s history. “We’re hopeful it will reflect its previous use in whatever they develop for the interior.” The site’s main building was not registered or protected, but the developers had received professional advice and had been granted an NZHPT archaeological authority.
–Owen Graham, NZHPT Otago Southland area manager

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Have your say: South Dunedin Retail Centre Strategy

Issues and Opportunities Consultation Document
(PDF, 458.7 kb, new window)

DCC weblink for more information

South Dunedin has historically been an important manufacturing and service area for Dunedin, and it remains a destination retail area for a large number of Dunedin residents. However, the trend over the last 15-20 years has been for a general decline in the main retail centre along King Edward Street, and a comparative increase in large format retail activities on the adjacent industrial land along Hillside Road and Andersons Bay Road.

As a result of this general decline, many people have raised concerns over the increasingly dilapidated appearance of the main retail centre and the overall vibrancy and success of the centre from both an economic and social perspective. As a result, the Council has identified the need for a strategy to revitalise South Dunedin’s retail centre.

The purpose of the South Dunedin Retail Centre Strategy is to identify an integrated package of actions that can be used to revitalise the retail centre, both economically and socially. The suggested goals for the strategy are to:

» Re-establish the economic role of the South Dunedin retail centre as a retail destination for the city by developing the centre into a place that people want to visit and spend time.

» Restore the social role of the centre as a place that provides opportunities for local residents to make regular contact with each other while engaged in routine activities.

The package of actions required to achieve these goals will need to include actions by both the Council and the community, in order to be successful.

The Issues and Opportunities Document is open for public consultation from 14 April 2010. Submitters are invited to return the submission form by 28 May 2010.

Make your submissions via

* Freepost: delivery details are on the form included with the consultation document (address to Principal Urban Designer, Dunedin City Council, PO Box 5045, Dunedin)

* Submit your comments online by completing this online form

* Email to south.dunedin@dcc.govt.nz

* Delivery: Customer Services, ground floor of the Civic Centre, 50 The Octagon, Dunedin

Dunedin City Council invites the community to comment on the range and relative importance of issues and opportunities identified to date.

On Wednesday 12 May, a public open day on South Dunedin Retail Centre – Issues and Opportunities was held at the Gasworks Museum in Braemar St, South Dunedin.

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Contentious guidance for town centres

### architectsjournal.co.uk Jan 4, 2010
Minister announces new town centre development guidance
By Simon Hogg
Housing and planning minister John Healey has announced an overhaul of the planning system to prioritising town centre shops over out of town developments.
The revamped system will give town hall planners ‘the tools they need to boost business growth and provide new safeguards for town centres and local markets,’ said Healey, who revealed the new guidance on a visit to Doncaster on 30 December.
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The Chronicles of Yarnia

With apologies to CS Lewis, the thread formerly known as “What else! Future options for Dunedin include…”.

Or, How We Ascend/Descend (Your Choice) Into Mud And Cloud Data, Again.

In the (slight but positive) delay to launch duned.in, the multi-author blog Paul is working to develop, I’m starting this new thread – it’s a BRAINSTORMER looking-forward place for your ideas and comments.

What if? threads will flow into the new duned.in so nothing’s lost. Time to ‘generate’. I’ve copied over comments received at High Street Cable Car to start things off. Away we go.

Peter November 25, 2009 at 11:22 am

Is the High St cable car option the only other one available if the upper Stuart St option is not viable? Isn’t it possible to run a rail car of some description – somewhere flat – like up to the North End, past the uni and Botanical Gardens to, say, the bottom of Baldwin St or out to South Dunedin / St Clair? It strikes me that the cost of going uphill makes the project more prohibitive because of health and safety issues and engineering difficulties. I’m no expert or authority on this. Just a curious citizen.
Whatever happens we need a railcar system that is practical and cheap for both city commuters and tourists. The Christchurch tram system is expensive to run, and to buy tickets for, and just seems to do a little meander around a relatively small area for the tourists. You may as well walk. There’s something kind of fake about it too.
For those real visionaries who are promoting this project – as opposed to the ’stadium visionaries’ – I don’t fancy the chances of anything happening soon or at least for many many years. (We know why, don’t we). I wouldn’t feel encouraged, but nevertheless good on them for persisting. Call me cynical, but the council’s response seems a nice way for gently letting people down and not completely dashing their hopes. If I was a cunning politician I would give such a sop to a sincere and dedicated group who are seen to be promoting something that is beneficial for ALL the people of Dunedin. The city kitty, unfortunately, has already been plundered – and the council knows it.

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Phil [Cole] November 25, 2009 at 8:57 pm

I have to agree with you there, Peter. I think the idea of a cable car or tram system is great. And I congratulate Richard and the team for their work to date. Bill Campbell must be as pleased as. I’m not convinced about the route, however. Ok, it’s historical. So maybe it will mean something to the people who live in the area. But is that the target audience? No, I don’t think it is. The market, if not for commuters, is the tourist market. And the history of a tram route means absolutely nothing to them. I just wonder, when they get to the top of High Street, what are they going to do? What are they going to spend their tourist dollars on during the 24 hours they have in Dunedin, when they are spending 2 or 3 of those hours in Mornington? And, to be fair, the view on the way up is not going to make it onto a lot of video cameras to show back home.

Brilliant idea, and I don’t want this to appear as a brickbat. I do question that we have the best location for the market we’re hoping to attract. Stuart Street would have been ideal, down to the Railway Station, through the CBD, or a route to the beach. But no one will get past Don I suspect.

Elizabeth November 25, 2009 at 10:11 pm

I diverged off the Dunedin Cable Car organising group before it formed the charitable trust to do further investigation. A very nice group all up.

I hesitated at the time to take on another trusteeship due to workload and priorities – but also, as discussed with the group members, I’m interested in contemporary forms of transit, design and engineering, mobility access (the accessible journey) – and yes, BEST future market(s)… they being on the “flat”, and via route(s) looped, as I see it.

I can’t live in museums. San Francisco is a great experience. Christchurch trams are not. What can Dunedin do differently with new forms of public transport into the future, utilising the city’s great engineering base!!?? Remains one of my deepest interests.

Richard November 26, 2009 at 8:22 am

Now that’s the line of thinking, I applaud. One in which I am trysting with ‘Pukeko’ at ODT Online. His interest is an aviation musuem on lines (planes?) that have little connection with Dunedin.

I’ll come back and develop my thoughts on cable cars, trams et al when I get some time. The sort of things that form part of what Dr. Rodney Wilson sees as making Dunedin “a heritage city”.

“Big thinking does not happen in small spaces.”

We need a new thread, EK?

Calvin Oaten November 26, 2009 at 9:47 am

I can’t believe that anyone genuinely thinks that a cable car would fit into the modern transport modes of this city. On the basis of economics, the hopeless task of integration and so called novelty factor, it wouldn’t get past first base. Move on, get over it. Look to the future, not the past. Think outside the square, and outside current traffic ways. For a similar amount of expenditure a gondola from Bethunes Gully up to Mount Cargill would give an experience to die for. The trip would be memorable, the views from the top are 180 degrees, and the overview of Dunedin total. Take a trip up by road and see if I am not right. But hey! don’t forget, the stadium has put paid to any of these dreams.

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