Tag Archives: Reliability

ORC: City bus services, submissions

Buses, Dunedin [radionz.co.nz]

“Heart-wrenching” tales of parents walking with young children from Corstorphine to Dunedin Hospital or walking up steep hills carrying bags of groceries while buses zoomed past…

### ODT Online Fri, 12 Sep 2014
Call for cheaper bus fares
By Rebecca Fox
Calls for public transport to be more affordable and accessible for the “walking poor” dominated yesterday’s public transport hearing. “Heart-wrenching” tales of parents walking with young children from Corstorphine to Dunedin Hospital or walking up steep hills carrying bags of groceries while buses zoomed past were made to the panel of regional councillors Sam Neill (chairman) and Michael Deaker, along with Dunedin city councillor Aaron Hawkins, as they sat through the second day of public submissions on the draft regional public transport plan. About 330 people and organisations made submissions to the draft plan that contains sweeping changes, expected to lead to faster and more direct routes away from smaller residential streets.
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Related Posts and Comments:
28.5.14 Otago Regional Council: Buses —Journey Planner (now online)
10.4.14 Otago Regional Council + Dunedin buses
27.12.13 Otago Heritage Bus shines !!! —ORC holiday bus suspension…
24.11.11 Dunedin buses: ORC or DCC
29.11.10 Phillip Cole on Dunedin buses

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: radionz.co.nz – Dunedin buses, George Street

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Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Media, Name, New Zealand, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design

Auckland launches electric trains

Auckland train [Auckland Transport] 1The first electric trains roll out tomorrow (Auckland Transport)

### 3news.co.nz Saturday 26 Apr 2014 7:00a.m.
Long wait for electric trains almost over
By Dan Satherley – Online Reporter
Almost a century ago, transport officials proposed electrifying Auckland’s nascent rail network. Tomorrow those plans become reality, with the public launch of the city’s first electric trains. All 5000 tickets for the inaugural rides, which start at 10am, were snapped up within 24 hours. Passengers will be taken from Britomart to Newmarket and back on the first of the 57 new trains to go into service.

“Our catchline is smarter, better, quieter, all those things. They’re much more efficient, they use a lot less energy, they are much, much quieter and they are much more reliable.”

Auckland Transport media manager Mark Hannan says the upgrade has been a long time coming. The current diesel-powered trains were purchased from Perth at scrap metal prices after the West Australian city electrified its network in the early 1990s. The first of the electric trains will be taking fare-paying passengers on the Onehunga line from Monday, and by the middle of next year all of the old locomotives will be history.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, Economics, Geography, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design

Local body elections: who will explain DCC’s books . . .

Received from Hype O’Thermia
Monday, 22 April 2013 3:37 a.m.

“In the boardroom, [Ngai Tahu chairman Mark] Solomon favours plain speaking. He tells a story about trying to get his head around the accounting terms used in Ngai Tahu’s financial statements, terms like EVA (economic value added) and WACC (weighted average cost of capital).

To improve understanding of such terms he asked for an explanatory document to be created and issued that with the report to iwi. It worked. Recently at one meeting an 84-year-old woman stood and challenged Solomon, arguing Ngai Tahu’s WACC was 1 per cent too low.”

Mark Solomon (stuff.co.nz)### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/04/2013
Business
The wisdom of Solomon
By Rob O’Neill – Sunday Star Times
After 15 years on the board, the chairman of Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu, Sir Mark Solomon, is willing to retire, but he will stay on for the long haul if he can’t find the right successor to lead the tribal council. Solomon, knighted in the 2013 New Year’s honours list for services to Maori and business, said, as with any organisation, there were people who put their own interests first and people who put the collective interest first. In Ngai Tahu terms he calls these “I Tahu” and “We Tahu”. “I’ve always stood in the middle of the ‘we’ camp,” he told an Institute of Directors conference in Auckland last week. “It always seems to me that politics is about ‘I’ versus ‘we’.” Whoever takes on his job will have to also be a “we” person, he said. Read more

Wouldn’t it be great if “Greater Dunedin’s” pre-election commitment to transparency had resulted in something like this, to bust asunder some of the tools used in official obfuscation!

Imagine if such an explanatory document had been distributed to ratepayers instead of Rodney’s puff-mag, and not only given to councillors but read aloud, attendance compulsory, security staff present to monitor for sleepiness and texty-wexing lovey-dove or playing angry birds under the table.

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Image: Mark Solomon via stuff.co.nz

17 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, DCHL, DVL, DVML, Economics, Name, People, Politics, Project management