Tag Archives: Regional economy

Bradken keen to sell Tewsley Street premises

### dunedintv.co.nz November 17, 2014 – 6:25pm
Bradken’s move to Hillside Workshops foundry delayed
It’s been two years since Bradken announced it would move its Dunedin operations to the Hillside Workshops foundry. But the global company seems unable to sell its long-time premises in Tewsley Street. Bradken signed a five-year agreement with KiwiRail to lease the Hillside foundry. It planned to move its entire operation to the site, and expand capacity. Some workers have moved to Hillside, and the foundry’s been marked with the Bradken logo. But the company’s Tewsley Street premises remain open and on the market. Bradken’s been in Tewsley Street for almost 50 years.
Ch39 Link

Bradken (Derek Smith - waterfront 28) 2Bradken Resources Pty Ltd, Mason St frontage (detail) | Derek Smith 2003

ODT articles:
25.1.13 Bradken tight-lipped over Hillside move
22.5.13 Bradken on the move
8.6.13 Bradken’s foundry site likely to be divided
5.7.13 Final day at Hillside
7.8.13 4-day week as Kiwi Rail tender lost
8.8.13 Otago unemployment up 37% on year ago
14.8.13 Bradken earnings down at $A183.6m
21.12.13 Rally helps keep Hillside hopes alive
29.12.13 Bradken staff back on five-day week

Bradken Resources Pty Ltd - 2 Tewsley St [DCC Webmap]DCC Webmap – Bradken, 2 Tewsley Street, Harbourside [click to enlarge]

### dunedntv.co.nz November 14, 2014 – 7:02pm
Nightly interview: Des Adamson
Des Adamson, DCC [Ch39 screenshot] 1There’s been good and bad news for the Dunedin business sector recently, with the closure of some operations and expansion of others. Des Adamson is the manager of economic development at Enterprise Dunedin, and he’s here to tell us about the state of business in the city. Video

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*In 2003 photographer Derek Smith generously shared two DVDs of Dunedin images he had made, for my use in heritage advocacy. These include industrial and commercial subjects.

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Southern Region, serving itself —or professional rugby (and Sky TV)

### ODT Online Tue, 1 Jul 2014
Opinion
Fresh thinking needed in local government
By Ciaran Keogh
Perhaps it is time to look at a far-reaching reform of the way local government functions at both local and regional level. There are substantial efficiencies to be gained from integrating many council functions across the councils within the region. More than 10 years ago I did away with all IT functions at the Clutha District Council and merged these with Invercargill City. This model would work for all of the councils across all of Otago and Southland for little more than it currently costs Dunedin City Council to run its IT services.
Some fresh thinking needs also to be applied to the stadium and the first of these should be the monopoly that rugby has over it and the grass surface.
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● Ciaran Keogh is a former chief executive of the Clutha District Council, Wakool Shire in the Riverina region of New South Wales, and Environment Southland. He now lives in Dunedin.

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Crowds had been down right across the five New Zealand franchises but that was a worldwide trend, with fewer people attending events.

### ODT Online Tue, 1 Jul 2014
Rugby: Crowds can’t fall any further – Clark
By Steve Hepburn
The Highlanders met budget for crowds this year but have warned they cannot dip any lower if the franchise is to remain viable. In the eight games the Highlanders hosted at Forsyth Barr Stadium this year, 98,326 people came through the gate, an average crowd of 12,291 per game. […] A crowd of 11,070 attended the last home game, the win over the Chiefs, a figure that did not exactly delight Highlanders general manager Roger Clark.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Winston Peters on the regions

Winston Peters [thejackalman.blogspot.com][thejackalman.blogspot.com]

### ODT Online Fri, 9 Aug 2013
Cuts in South ‘sick joke’, Peters says
By Dene Mackenzie
New Zealand First leader Winston Peters arrives in Dunedin today determined to talk to as many people as possible about the local and regional economy. When contacted in Wellington, Mr Peters said he was concerned about the lack of regional development throughout New Zealand, particularly in areas where significant infrastructure had been paid for long ago by the taxpayers.

“Much of this is unused. It is not being expanded to help regions grow. I’ve listened to this psycho-babble for 28 years. The last person to have a regional development plan was Jim Anderton.”

Mr Peters quoted cuts in the regions to state housing, hospital services, schools, government departments and social services. “The infrastructure is there in places like Oamaru, Dunedin, Timaru and the West Coast.” The spending of money in Christchurch and Auckland was a “vote-gathering exercise”, he said. It was a “sick joke” that so much of New Zealand’s exports came from Otago and Southland – along with other regions – but they were being neglected.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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NZIER on big events #RWC2011

When a new stadium and RWC 2011 at Dunedin were first floated as ideas we easily saw them as losers.

### ODT Online Tue, 30 Oct 2012
Business
Big events don’t make host countries richer: NZIER
By Jamie Gray
Big events like the Rugby World Cup do not make the host countries richer, independent economic research group NZIER said. NZIER said major international events tended to “suck in” visitors from before and after the time they are held, creating a displacement effect. It said most event analysis doesn’t stack up because it missed the displacement effects. “It means the benefits are often far smaller than people think,” NZIER said in a report. The displacement effect meant the net number of visitors an event generates is much lower than the visitors to the event, and NZIER said the Rugby World Cup 2011 was a good example of this. “We estimate there was little overall boost to visitor arrivals because there were fewer visitors before and after the 133,000 international visitors that came to New Zealand for the tournament,” it said. “Crucially, domestic tourism is displaced expenditure that would occur elsewhere in the economy. This significantly reduces the overall benefit from the events. Simply put, major domestic events do not make New Zealanders any wealthier.”
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NZIER – established in 1958 as the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research Inc – is a non-profit incorporated society based in Wellington. Its team of economists is one of the largest in New Zealand outside government.

http://nzier.org.nz/publications

Report: The host with the most? Rethinking the costs and benefits of hosting major events (30 October 2012)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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interest.co heats NZ housing debate – listen up

This is not just about the Accommodation Supplement that 320,000 New Zealanders received last year. Alex Tarrant’s full post prompts a sharp, sometimes shonky blogging debate. It raises critical issues that dog the consultation and drafting of Dunedin’s spatial plan but which never got a look in, and never will. Read the comments.

Our ‘first’ spatial plan should not have been rushed, given the time scale it must address. For ‘rushed’ substitute ‘superheated’, where respect and consideration are much diminished for existing patterns of living (good and bad), underlying and surrounding issues, Southern practices and philosophies, utilisation of natural and people-made resources, regional and global influences, and cumulative effects – and the real economics of PLACE-SHAPING that hinge on the recent actions of a badly-managed, far-from-smart city council that has manufactured a mountain of unsustainable debt.

### interest.co.nz December 7, 2011 – 04:12pm
Property
Accommodation Supplement: Landlord subsidy punching a big hole in govt books due to unaffordable housing, or an essential benefit?
By Alex Tarrant
The government is being urged to boost the supply of affordable housing to help wean people off a state rent subsidy which could cost NZ$2.2 billion a year – almost twice as much as official predictions – by 2016. But any fix could require a large up-front investment in state house building, and/or require action from the private and community sectors to help increase housing supply, and therefore affordability, at the lower end of the price spectrum.

The Green Party has called on the government to see whether spending on the Accommodation Supplement could be more effectively spent elsewhere, with the party touting construction of more state houses as one solution to problems of housing and rent affordability. Co-leader Meteria Turei has attacked the Accommodation Supplement in Parliament as a subsidy for landlords. Turei told interest.co.nz high house prices, with constrained supply, meant higher rents and therefore costs to the government through the rent subsidy.

Meanwhile, the government’s Productivity Commission, which is currently investigating issues of housing affordability in New Zealand, has had the issue of the Accommodation Supplement, and the possible hit to the government’s books, raised with it by the Salvation Army.
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One (sample) blogger, right or wrong…

by PhilBest | 08 Dec 11, 11:08am (at Tarrant’s thread)

The fact, observable everywhere in the world where there are urban growth containment policies, is that the escalation of urban land prices under this racket, is always greater than the ability of people to “trade off” space to keep within what they can afford.

The few remaining undistorted markets in the world, have a LOWER median multiple house price AND a far larger average amount of space per person. A one-eighth of an acre section in NZ or Britain, costs literally several times as much as a 1 acre section in many US cities (regardless of pre-or-post-crash conditions. The US cities without urban land rackets had no price bubble).

The result of fringe homes being $150,000 houses on $250,000 sections instead of $150,000 houses on $50,000 sections; is that a decent apartment near the CBD is $1,000,000 (almost all of which represents gold-plated land value) instead of under $200,000 as it is in the undistorted market.

The biggest irony in all this, is that FAR LESS people have the “choice” of living near the CBD, under the “inflated land price” model. Economist Jan Brueckner says in a paper entitled “Urban Growth Boundaries: An Effective Second-Best Remedy For Unpriced Traffic Congestion?”:

“…failure of the Urban Growth Boundary to appreciably raise densities near employment centres is the main reason for its poor performance, and this failure will persist regardless of whether the city has one or many such centres…”

There are numerous other similar academic findings from economists listed HERE: http://www.performanceurbanplanning.org/academics.html

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Wellington Towards 2040

Forming the “digital powerhouse”…

Wellington’s biggest assets are its compact form, its harbour setting and the quality of life. It also boasts a highly skilled population with the highest incomes in the country.

### idealog.co.nz 29 Sept 2011 @ 11:13 am
Wellington’s new 30-year vision
By Design Daily Team
Last night Wellington City Council unanimously agreed on a long term vision for the city, one that will have sustainability, digital saviness and innovation at its core. Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown said the strategy, called Wellington Towards 2040: Smart Capital, would underpin and guide all Council strategies across economic, environmental, social, technology, transport and other key issues.

The four goals identified by the council are:

People-centred city – the aim is to be healthy, vibrant, affordable, resilient, have a strong sense of identity, and strong and healthy communities.

Connected city – this is connectedness in every sense: physical, virtual or social. Strategies like the Digital Strategy fall under this.

Eco-city – this is a response to all the environmental challenges the city faces over the coming decades, and the Council is confident [it] can lead the country by example.

Dynamic central city – this section largely deals with urban design aspects of the central city – making sure it’s still a great place to be where new ideas happen – and maintaining its role as the creative and innovative force to drive the regional economy.

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WCC Report (15 September 2011)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Storm Cunningham: Champion of the Restoration Economy

Updated post
Sun, 14 Feb 2016 at 3:32 a.m.

“Restorationists… a huge, dynamic professional community.”

“Restorative development: The process of adding new value to natural or built assets, ideally in a manner that detracts neither from their other preexisting values, nor from the value of other assets.”

The following is an advertisement of sorts, hoop-la with compelling messages…

Source: www.revitaliz.com

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Storm Cunningham is the author of The Restoration Economy (Berrett-Koehler, 2002) and reWealth (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2008).

The Restoration Economy is the first book on regenerative growth: the first to document the “hidden”, multi-trillion-dollar economic sector that is revitalising our communities, our nations, and our natural resources. Regenerative growth is also called “restorative development”: in it lies the future of our civilisation, and our planet.

Storm Cunningham is CEO of Resolution Fund, LLC. This Washington, DC-based firm offers the Renewal Capacity Program, a series of seven 1-day workshops that help communities worldwide efficiently ignite rapid, resilient renewal of their economy, their natural resources, and their quality of life. Resolution Fund trains both the public and the private sectors to partner more effectively on regeneration, and then matches these communities and redevelopers on the right projects at the right time.

Storm is also founder of Revitalization Institute, the non-profit international academic alliance for community renewal and natural resource restoration, and is Distinguished Visiting Professor at Seneca College, Canada’s largest educational institution.

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The Restoration Economy helped launch the consolidation of what might be the most important new industry on earth: The fragmented $1.5 – $2 trillion-dollar/year restorative development industry, whose practitioners are now uniting through the work of the Revitalization Institute. Hundreds of thousands of business, government, academic, and non-profit leaders have been restoring the world’s communities and natural resources, but under a myriad of names, such as “redevelopers”, “remediators”, or “restorers” of ecosystems, heritage, watersheds, fisheries, disasters, wars, infrastructure, etc. It has inspired exciting new economic revitalisation strategies, such as the leading-edge Oilforest Plan for tropical countries looking to wean themselves from over-dependence on economically and environmentally unsustainable monoculture crops (such as bananas).

Until this groundbreaking book came along, these restorative investors, architects, engineers, planners, biologists, preservationists, community leaders, foresters, and entrepreneurs often didn’t perceive that they were all revitalisation professionals. We now understand that we can’t revitalise a city or region in bits and pieces (such as individual brownfields projects or historic buildings): True, self-sustaining revitalisation comes from applying the 3 Renewal Rules.

The Restoration Economy describes a huge, fast-growing new growth frontier for entrepreneurs, investors, and organisational leaders, not to mention graduates looking for the most personally fulfilling and financially rewarding career path.

Restorative development comprises eight industries that are restoring our natural and our manmade environments worldwide. The book’s Table of Contents reveals these eight industries; you can also read the entire Preface and Introduction online at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/The-Restoration-Economy-Storm-Cunningham/dp/1576751910 [go to ‘Look inside’].

Source: www.restorationeconomy.com

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“Storm Cunningham and William McDonough were born the same year, 1951. Both published landmark environmental books in the same year, 2002. And both are optimistic about the world’s future in spite of the spectre of climate change and resource depletion. Now [Cunningham’s] got another book… it’s called reWealth, a volume of insights, examples and tools needed “to create rapid, resilient, regional renewal in cities and natural areas anywhere on the planet.”
– Korky Koroluk, “Cradle to Cradle” and “The Restoration Economy” offer food for thought, in Daily Commercial News & Construction Record, March 28, 2008
[read article]

www.rewealth.com

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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