Tag Archives: Red-stickered

Christchurch heritage buildings approved for demolition #eqnz

Canterbury Earthquake
Media advisory – Tuesday 15 March 2011, 1930 hours

Process for approving deconstruction
In the case of heritage buildings, a robust process is followed that involves an assessment by Heritage and by Lifelines (utilities) and an inspection carried out by a suitably qualified engineer.
Every endeavour is being made to contact all owners of buildings if demolition or deconstruction is necessary.
There will be no salvaging of materials in buildings unless it is by the building owner or those contracted to carry out salvage work.

Heritage buildings approved for deconstruction
* Provincial Hotel – 274 Cashel Street
* 112 Centaurus Road – Dwelling
* Cathedral Grammar – Chester Street West 8 (2), Stratham Building
* Austral Building – 603 – 615 Colombo Street (includes 170 Tuam Street)
* Bean Bags and Beyond – 626 (aka 626) Colombo Street
* 625 – 629 Colombo Street – Commercial buildings
* Wave House/Winnie Bagoes – 194 Gloucester Street
* Hereford Court – 116 Hereford
* Piko Whole Foods – 229 Kilmore Street
* Park Lane Handbags – 111 – 113 Lichfield Street
* Former Ridley Building – 116 Lichfield Street
* Nurse Maude – 192 Madras Street
* Charlie Backpacker – 268 Madras Street
* Former City Council Offices – 198 Manchester Street
* Forbes Building – 17 Norwich Quay 17, Lyttleton
* Rhodes Memorial Hospital – Overdale Drive 2
* Edison Hall, Workshop, Witchery – 230 – 232 Tuam St
* Domo – 236 Tuam St
* Fuller Brothers Ltd – 180 Tuam Street
* Addington Flour Mill – 14 Wise Street
* Gopals Restaurant and Pedros Restaurant – 143 Worcester Street

This totals 21 buildings, but note that Colombo Street’s Austral Building also includes 170 Tuam Street and there are multiple buildings included in the Colombo Street addresses
NB: This list differs slightly from the list provided at the media briefing today.

Deconstruction of Addington (aka Old Woods) Flour Mill, 14 Wise St
This deconstruction was triggered by USAR, who recommended the partial or total deconstruction of the building for rescue or recovery purposes or because it presents an unacceptable safety risk from aftershocks.
There are three separate buildings on site that were assessed:

* the mill building itself that has the greatest heritage value,
* a chimney, and
* a brick-clad silos assessed as having a lesser heritage value.

The silos and chimney were badly damaged. The mill building itself was assessed as repairable. The engineer’s report recommended the deconstruction of the silos and the chimney only.
This approved deconstruction sign-off process was followed in this case and the recommendation provided to the National Controller for approval/signature on March 3.

Weblink

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Photograph of quake-damaged Addington mill building
By @Motmunter, Campbell Live cameraman

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under #eqnz, Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Letter from Christchurch 2 #eqnz

UPDATED

Today’s Press has more examples of high-handed action.

The Piko Whole-Foods Co-op store – an important social and architectural landmark – had its top storey removed before the owners knew what was going to happen. The heritage team at Christchurch City Council worked with the owners to try and stop the demolition but the top floor had already gone by the time they got there and its landmark value has been completely destroyed. The building had been earthquake strengthened within the past few years and though it did have some serious damage it is far from clear that it was beyond repair.

It had the misfortune to be sited on a major intersection of the one way system and we all know that free movement of cars must be put ahead of buildings. There was absolutely no question of people being in the building and thorough shoring up should have ensured public safety.

There is some sort of process for group 1 & 2 listed buildings, plus NZHPT registered buildings – a cursory sort of report by the heritage planners (they are so overwhelmed that the reports are completely perfunctory) – and a report from the NZHPT and/or council engineer, but the Civil Defence Controller has the final say.

I am not sure that NZHPT is fighting too hard anyway from what I can gather – because people have been killed (mainly in modern buildings) they seem to have taken the view that they can’t push hard for heritage.

If the owner can be identified (not always easy) they might be given 24 hours notice so have a chance to argue for a delay. If buildings are unlisted and simply make an important contribution to the character of a precinct, no process is required at all. Nothing at all can be done to try and avert demolition.

There seems to have been some agreement made between Civil Defence and the council staff involved with Civil Defence, that no cordons to protect the public from buildings needing repair will be put in place if they would encroach into a road – as long as they take that view not much will be saved.

As a result of tonight’s meeting a delegation of heritage advocates and business people are going to try and meet the Civil Defence Controller tomorrow to urge a slow down, but whether they will even be granted an appointment is far from certain.

We are meeting again on Friday to plan our next steps, especially if the appeal to the Controller fails to have any impact. The scary thing is the Government can just keep on extending the state of emergency.

{Letter received by What if? on Tuesday, 8 March 2011 11.24pm. Names removed to protect identities. -Eds}

(9.00am) What if? learned the group has been granted a meeting today with the Civil Defence Controller.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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