Tag Archives: Rattray Street

Heritage: Old BNZ, Dunedin —restored

Work on the historic bank included strengthening the structure from 67% of building code requirements to 100% and installing a full fire sprinkler system.

Old BNZ c.1888 [FA Coxhead] re-imaged 1205 Princes St – Old BNZ c.1888 (photo by FA Coxhead re-imaged)

With Silver Fern [Farms] also moving into the old chief post office, it will give the Exchange momentum. The shops will do better and it will give the whole area more impetus. –Michael van Aart

### ODT Online Sat, 27 Jul 2013
Refurbished bank building ready for law firm
By Nigel Benson
Dunedin’s former commercial heart – the Exchange – will pulsate with new life next week. With scaffolding removed and tradesmen gone, the 130-year-old Bank of New Zealand building in Princes St will become the new home to commercial law firm Van Aart Sycamore Lawyers on Wednesday. The occupation of the building, which is considered architect William Barnett Armson’s (1834-1883) masterpiece, follows an 18-month restoration project.
“We’re really looking forward to moving in,” firm director Michael van Aart said yesterday. “The building is dramatic and one of a kind. We have to celebrate the unique features we have here in Dunedin and heritage is certainly one of them. The Exchange was the heart of New Zealand’s economy when it was built.”
The building had been untenanted for the past 13 years. Van Aart Sycamore Lawyers had been based in Radio House for the past six years and the move would be good for the Exchange, Mr van Aart believed.
Read more

Old BNZ, Armson drawing no. 10 (Princes St facade) 2Armson drawing no. 10, Princes St facade with secondary doorway

Readings:
New Zealand Historic Places Trust – Category 1 Historic Place
(No. 7299) Registration Report – the history and significance

[wikipedia] Princes Street, Dunedin
[wikipedia] Bank of New Zealand

Book: John Barsby, The BNZ Building, Princes Street Dunedin (Southern Heritage Trust, 2011)

Related Post and Comments:
26.2.13 Bank of New Zealand Building, 205 Princes St (cnr Rattray)
[more images]

Banking desk from former BNZ Bank, Otago Settlers Museum [nzmuseums.co.nz]The banking desk designed by architect Robert A Lawson is held by Otago Settlers Museum; and an original ornamental fire surround from the bank is installed at Antrim House (NZHPT National Office) in Wellington (photographs in Barsby). It is thought one more fire surround went to another Wellington residence.

Drawing for write-up desk, Old BNZ (RA Lawson)RA Lawson, Drawing for write-up desk, Old BNZ

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

3 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Urban design, What stadium

158 Rattray Street (Tai Ping), suspicious fire?

158 Rattray St (Tai Ping) - Google Street ViewGoogle Street View

### ODT Online Tue, 23 Jul 2013
Tai Ping badly damaged by fire
By Rebecca Fox
Well-known Rattray St food bar and restaurant, the Tai Ping, has been extensively damaged by fire. Smoke from the central Dunedin blaze, which was reported about 9.24pm, was so thick it set off smoke alarms in about six other buildings, some as far away as Moray Pl. Fire appliances had to be called in from Ravensbourne and Port Chalmers to help clear those buildings, while crews from three appliances and a turntable ladder truck put out the fire. Tai Ping owner Henry Chin said his wife was at the back of the premises, preparing food, when the fryer at the front of the shop overheated and caught fire. “She didn’t realise until it caught hold.” If there had been customers in the shop it would have been caught before it got to that stage, he said. He had gone home to pick up their children for tea.
Read more

We’ve been keeping a watching brief on the buildings at 150-170 Rattray Street in past months, for good reason, now this. The old fryer trick when no-one’s about much . . .

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

15 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Economics, Heritage, Media, Name, People, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Bank of New Zealand Building, 205 Princes St (cnr Rattray)

Dunedin 1883 blg taken 1976 lowresBNZ Bank, The Exchange 1976

### ODT Online Tue, 26 Feb 2013
New lease of life for BNZ building
By Debbie Porteous
A grand old dame of the Dunedin streetscape is being brought back to life by a Dunedin law firm. The historic Bank of New Zealand Building at the corner of Rattray and Princes Sts, in the Exchange, will, come June, be home to commercial law firm Van Aart Sycamore Lawyers, after the company bought the building and is having it renovated. BNZ main entry detail - City WalksFirm directors Michael Van Aart and Tony Sycamore said they were looking for permanent premises and the building’s location, natural light and character had appealed. Mr Sycamore said he expected the building would be “a really nice place to work”. The location was also great. Buildings around the Exchange area were filling up with commercial tenants, in what was historically the commercial heart of Dunedin. The company’s 14 staff would be based on the first floor, and once they had moved in the firm hoped to find tenants for the other three floors.

The company was strengthening the building from 67% of code to 100%, and installing full fire sprinkler systems throughout, as well as renovating and fitting out new offices, while retaining the heritage features of the building preserved by previous owner Ted Daniels.

The company was working closely with the Dunedin City Council and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust on the refurbishment.
Read more

Heritage New Zealand – Category 1 Historic Place
(No. 7299) Registration Report – the history and significance

The Bank of New Zealand Building was designed and constructed over the period 1877-1883. The architect, William Barnett Armson, was one of the first colonially-trained architects to work in New Zealand. He trained at Melbourne in architecture, engineering and surveying, and returned to New Zealand in 1862. The building is considered to be the architect’s masterpiece, and New Zealand’s finest surviving nineteenth century bank.

Dunedin interior built 1883 lowresInterior, before alterations circa 1960. Campbell Photography, Dunedin

The bank is elsewhere described as one of the few New Zealand buildings to reflect the large scale of the sixteenth century Italian palazzo, its prototype. The richly carved exterior features New Zealand plants and landscapes carved by Louis John Godfrey. The interior was extensively modernised by the architects Mandeno and Fraser in 1958 but the superb plaster ceiling over the banking chamber was preserved.

Dunedin Ceiling 1883 lowresCeiling, main banking chamber

Related Post:
27.7.13 Heritage: Old BNZ, Dunedin —restored

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: BNZ Archives, Wellington (via Ted Daniels); Athol Parks, citywalks.co.nz

3 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Heritage, Inspiration, Media, Name, NZHPT, People, Project management, Property, Site, Urban design

180 Rattray St, Dunedin — former P. Hayman & Co. Building (1872)

North Princes Street/Moray Place/Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03)

Correction: The council received 12 submissions on the application.

### ODT Online Tue, 11 Oct 2011
Demolition hearing delayed
By Chris Morris
A 19th-century central Dunedin commercial building has been granted a temporary reprieve from the wrecking ball, after an application to demolish it to make way for a car park was placed on hold. However, building owner Lincoln Darling said when contacted yesterday he planned to proceed with the application next year, and nothing had changed. Mr Darling had sought resource consent to demolish the former Furniture Court Building at 180 Rattray St and replace it with a rental car park until another development opportunity arose.

• “Obviously, you do look at submissions … if they [submitters] want to chat with me I’m quite happy to talk to them about their concerns.” -Lincoln Darling

• New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago-Southland area manager Owen Graham, in his submission, argued the “deficient” application lacked a detailed heritage assessment.

• Mr Darling said he had contacted Mr Graham last week to arrange a meeting, but had no views on his submission as “I haven’t even read it”.

Read more

Related Post, Comments and Recent Correspondence:
25.8.11 180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition…

Lincoln Darling and friends might like to attend the DCC Workshop for heritage building owners on Wednesday, 23 November.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

3 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, DCC, Economics, Heritage, Media, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition means loss of nineteenth century alley

The Exchange area stands to lose the solid Victorian era building constructed of bluestone and brick, with a modern frontage, standing next door to the listed Speight’s Shamrock Building (1912-1913), opposite the listed Crown Hotel (1890). Significantly, the proposed site development at 180 Rattray Street will also destroy one of Dunedin’s outstanding nineteenth century service alleys.

The former P. Hayman & Co. Building (1872) under threat of demolition is located in the district plan listed North Princes Street / Moray Place / Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03). The building, designed by architect David Ross, is not individually listed for protection in the district plan (Schedule 25.1); nor is it registered by New Zealand Historic Places Trust.

The Dunedin City Council has recently granted demolition consent for the N. & E.S. Paterson Building (date?) and the Barron Building (1875) in Rattray Street.
[ODT link]

180 Rattray Street, Dunedin
Resource consent is sought to demolish the existing building on site; and to use the empty site for stand alone rental car parking.

The resource consent application from Paterson Pitts, on behalf of building owner Lincoln Darling, says: “Although it was built before 1900 and had bluestone foundations and ground floor, the modernisation of the building had destroyed the original facade to the point it no longer had any heritage significance.”

The application acknowledged the site might be an archaeological site in terms of the Historic Places Act and, if so, an authority might be required.

Closing Date for Submissions: Wednesday 21 September 2011 at 5pm.
Read the application at the DCC website.

### ODT Online Thu, 25 Aug 2011
Application to demolish building
By Debbie Porteous
Consent is being sought to demolish the former Furniture Court Building in Rattray St, Dunedin, and use the site as a car park. The resource consent application from Paterson Pitts, on behalf of building owner Lincoln Darling, states Mr Darling had been unable to attract any tenants after Furniture Court moved to another location.
Read more

Rattray Street circa 1900. Hocken Collections [c/n E3856/42]
At far left, P Hayman & Co’s store, 180 Rattray Street

Related Posts:
12.4.11 Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect
19.2.11 Owner of Dragon Café/Barron Building has lodged an application to demolish.
26.1.11 D Scene: Honour heritage
22.1.11 SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics
Lincoln Darling is the current owner of the Barron Building.

ODT Online:
21.5.11 Downfall of the Dainty Dairy
21.5.11 Land, lots of land
3.5.11 ‘Holes’ spoil townscape – DCC

See comments at (14.4.11) Public consultation for DCC Earthquake-prone Buildings Policy. Lincoln Darling is a former owner of the Dainty Dairy on Stuart Street, another historic commercial building under threat of demolition.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Economics, Heritage, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition

175 Rattray Street, Dunedin, New Zealand

Please support the retention and restoration of Dunedin’s iconic Dragon Café / Barron Building by signing the online petition at this link:

http://www.gopetition.com/petition/42203.html

A paper petition is currently being prepared for circulation.

From an earlier post, following a recent site visit to “the first and second floor interiors of the Barron and Co building . . . The [architect] Owen Macfie interiors are still in existence and although in some places in poor condition are for the most part unaltered and therefore pretty special”.

Photo: Paul Le Comte (January 2011)

Photo: JW Allen, Barron Building c. 1880
Hocken Collections [c/n F405/16]

Related Posts, Comments and Photographs:
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics
12.1.11 Demo by neglect? Save the facade?

Latest Update 22.1.11 Dunedin Heritage Fund

Photo: Elizabeth Kerr (January 2011)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design