Tag Archives: Public places

John Montgomery: The Economy, Culture and Design of Cities

Dunedin City Council hosted a public lecture by Dr John Montgomery at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery last Friday (16 September).

Dr Montgomery provided a presentation [PDF, 5.94 MB] on the economy, culture and design of cities, building on his work in the UK and Australia. His views are particularly relevant for the development of Dunedin’s Central City Plan and Economic Development strategies.

John Montgomery is an urban planner, economist, author and managing director of Urban Cultures Ltd.

Urban Cultures consults in urban economics, city planning, urban design, arts-led urban revitalisation and managing the night-time city.

More on John Montgomery at Idealog.

Your City Our Future (YCOF) – Update

Dunedin City Council undertook a city-wide consultation in June 2011 to identify priorities for future expenditure. The results from the consultation survey are available here: YCOF survey report July 2011

The information and feedback received from the consultation, along with the feedback from the YCOF leadership teams has been used in the development of the Council’s draft spatial plan, “Dunedin Towards 2050”, draft Central City Plan, and draft Economic Development Strategy.

Formal consultation on these documents is planned for October/November 2011.

Find additional information on the development of the Council’s Central City Plan here: www.dunedin.govt.nz/centralcityplan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Landscape urbanism + ‘larger infrastructure of the territory of our cities and towns’

“Landscape is doing some serious environmental heavy lifting.”
–Adriaan Geuze, West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture

### architectmagazine.com October 6, 2010
Source: ARCHITECT October 2010
Urban Design
Systems, Not Icons: The unstoppable rise of landscape urbanism
By John Gendall
Not long ago, landscape architects were often dismissed as the consultants who put finishing touches on a building site—the broccoli around a steak. But with landscape architects increasingly taking lead positions on large-scale projects, winning urban design competitions around the world, and expanding the design market share, broccoli, clearly, is a thing of the past.
In many ways, the bellwether for these changes was James Corner’s career arc. As a young designer in Richard Rogers’ office, he grew frustrated by a lack of collaboration between disciplines on the postindustrial London Docklands project. Setting out on his own, he founded Field Operations, which has transformed itself from a boutique landscape practice turning out small projects and academic essays into a significant urban design firm with high-profile projects around the world. The critical step in that transition was when Corner won the competition to turn Freshkills, a huge former landfill in New York City, into a public park.
Underscoring this trend, the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD) is in the midst of expanding its landscape faculty by six professorships over two years, and its landscape student body by 50 percent. And landscape architecture’s academic expansion holds up with the most tried-and-true indicator: It’s following the money. Large corporate architecture firms are ramping up their urban design and landscape divisions, as AECOM notably did in 2005 when it acquired EDAW, then among the world’s largest landscape firms.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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European Workshop Waterfront Urban Design

@ Lisboa (Lisbon is the capital and largest city of Portugal)

### archdaily.com 27 Jan 2010
European Workshop Waterfront Urban Design
By Sebastian J
ULHT (Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias) has organised an international workshop on the theme of waterfront design (European Workshop Waterfront Urban Design) EWWUD. This event will take place between 14 and 28 March 2010 and has several international specialists in nine foreign universities.
Solutions for the relocation of port facilities and the consequent waterfront regeneration of old ports are dependent upon the capacity of both port and city to sucessfully develop the necessary means of negotiation, to work towards mutual improvements. While port representatives privilege the efficiency of maritime activity, city leaders pursue improvements to their citizens’ quality of life.

Exchange of good practices between port cities is required with two goals: to support the ports’ need to expand and relocate, and to produce urban waterfront REGENERATION that integrates rather than segregates neighbourhoods and their citizens.

Workshop objectives:
Port cities sharing similar experiences regarding projects of architecture and urban design at former port areas; discussion of the influence generated by geographic and historical factors; introduction of the cartographic culture of urban fabric’s transformation at the water edge; comparison of cultural, environmental and historical heritage solutions; port cities exchange mutual visions and common pratices, that constitute a relevant tool for the regeneration of former port areas; production of architecture and urban design sketches for publication; understanding that former industrial waterfronts are potential sites of continuity for urban morphology.
Email: ewwud @ulusofona.pt

ArchDaily Link + Workshop Poster

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Singapore’s Waterfront Gardens @Marina Bay

### http://www.inhabit.com 21 December 2009
Singapore’s Largest Garden Project Unveiled
By Mike Chino
Designs have just been released for Bay South, an incredible botanical preserve topped with super-tall solar trees that is set to be Singapore’s largest garden project. Conceived by Grant Associates, the 101-hectare expanse of lush green space will be situated right next to the Marina Bay resort and will feature two botanical biospheres and a series of towering tree structures that double as vertical gardens.
Read more + Images

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Grant Associates and Gustafson Porter have won an international competition, organised by Singapore’s National Parks Board, to design Gardens by the Bay, part of the next phase of the city’s masterplan.

According to Grant Associates: This is the largest garden project ever undertaken in Singapore, and a landscape project of world significance. It is intended to raise Singapore’s profile and cement its image as the leading garden city in the east. It is therefore integral to the future planning of Singapore as a major global hub and business centre.

The masterplan takes its inspiration from the form of the orchid, and has an intelligent infrastructure that allows the cultivation of plants that would not otherwise grow in Singapore. The centrepiece of this infrastructure is the cluster of Cooled Conservatories along the edge of Marina Bay. The Cool Dry and the Cool Moist Conservatories showcase Mediterranean, tropical montane and temperate annual plants and flowering species. They also provide a flexible, flower-themed venue for events and exhibitions.
Read more

█ Download: PDF project sheet.

olruchimaru 06 November 2009

olruchimaru 06 November 2009
This is the second film created by Squint/Opera for the Singapore Bay International Design Competition to depict the client’s exuberant and ambitious scheme. It follows the flight of two dragonflies as they weave their way through the imagined gardens, guiding us through the unfurling layers of vegetation and the hothouse structures.

Squint/Opera is a film and media production studio whose unique work and methods bridge the disciplines of visual communication and architecture.The company makes short films, computer-generated visualisations, installations and interactive content to communicate architectural possibilities, putting narrative and humour to the service of deeply innovative design and techniques of illustration.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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