Tag Archives: Public consultation

Cr Vandervis on DCC project budgets

Sat, 16 May 2015 at 11:39 p.m.

via Malcolm Dixon’s Facebook page [link to Build Dunedin]
https://www.facebook.com /malcolm.dixon.528/posts/10152926652873106

Facebook - Lee Vandervis on DCC projects (via Malcolm Dixon link to Build Dunedin)

Related Posts and Comments:
7.5.15 DCC Draft LTP 2015/16-2024/25 —public submissions online
28.3.15 DCC Draft LTP 2015/16 to 2024/25 —CONSULTATION OPEN
25.3.15 DCC Long Term Plan: Green-dyed chickens home to roost
14.1.15 DCC Draft Long Term Plan: more inanity from Cull’s crew pending

█ For more about DCC and Cr Lee Vandervis, enter *vandervis* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under Business, Carisbrook, Citifleet, Corruption, CST, Cycle network, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, Democracy, Design, Disinformation, DVL, DVML, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Events, Fraud, Geography, Heritage, Highlanders, LGNZ, Media, Museums, Name, New Zealand, Ngai Tahu, NZRU, NZTA, OAG, OCA, Offshore drilling, ORFU, Otago Polytechnic, People, Police, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Stupidity, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design

DCC Draft LTP 2015/16-2024/25 —public submissions online


You are able to search by submitter or subject/topic and view the details of the submission received by the Dunedin City Council to the DRAFT Long Term Plan 2015/16-2024/25.

The submissions are listed in alphabetical order of surname first.

█ Go to: http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/draft-long-term-plan-2015-2016/public-submissions

Related Posts and Comments:
28.3.15 DCC Draft LTP 2015/16 to 2024/25 —CONSULTATION OPEN
25.3.15 DCC Long Term Plan: Green-dyed chickens home to roost
14.1.15 DCC Draft Long Term Plan: more inanity from Cull’s crew pending


Filed under Architecture, Business, Carisbrook, Citifleet, Construction, Corruption, CST, Cycle network, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, Democracy, Design, Disinformation, DVL, DVML, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Events, Fraud, Geography, Heritage, Highlanders, Hot air, LGNZ, Media, Museums, Name, New Zealand, Ngai Tahu, NZRU, NZTA, OAG, OCA, Offshore drilling, ORC, ORFU, Otago Polytechnic, People, Police, Politics, Project management, Property, SFO, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design

DCC Draft Long Term Plan 2015/16 to 2024/25 —CONSULTATION OPEN

DCC Building a great small city Draft LTP 2015-16 to 2024-25 (1)

There is no SMALL CITY in this image.
Guess we haven’t started building yet. When we do it will take consolidated council debt to way over the existing +$600M which, of course, Mayor Liability Cull is already bleakly and ‘creatively’ responsible for.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Long Term Plan Consultation Document Unveiled

This item was published on 27 Mar 2015

‘Building a Great Small City’, the consultation document for the DCC’s Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015/16 – 2024/25, has been released.

Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says the LTP is designed to enable the Council to examine the bigger picture and set a strategic direction for the city covering the whole range of DCC activities. Now priorities have been proposed, the Council wants to hear from residents.

The consultation document is now available at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/ltp
Public consultation on the LTP opens on Saturday (today) and closes at 5pm on 28 April. People are encouraged to provide their feedback early and, if possible, use the online form.

A snapshot of what is proposed, presented in a map fold newsletter, will be delivered to every Dunedin household. Once consultation has started, there will be further information on the DCC website and copies of the LTP consultation document will be available at DCC facilities such as libraries and the Customer Services Agency in the Civic Centre. There will also be public workshops and LTP stands in public places and at events, with the opportunity for face-to-face discussion with Councillors. These will be held around the wider city during the consultation period.

For the first time, comments on the DCC Facebook page and tweets to @DnCityCouncil using #LTP will also be considered as feedback.

█ 28.3.15 ODT: Council accepts social media feedback

Mr Cull says, “The LTP allows us to look at the aspirations outlined in our strategy documents and how we should prioritise these over the next 10 years. This means the LTP needs to balance our financial goals, such as debt reduction, and our desire to develop Dunedin to make it a more attractive place to live and do business. Our Financial Strategy imposes a 3% rate increase limit unless there are exceptional circumstances. This is in line with the average 3% ‘cost of living’ increases faced by local government. Under current proposals, an overall 3.8% rate increase is proposed for 2015/16. The exceptional circumstances are that, in addition to our usual inflationary pressures, we have had to provide an extra $1.5 million for the Forsyth Barr Stadium and budget for losing $4.5 million of dividend from Dunedin City Holdings Limited, which owns companies on the DCC’s behalf. We have absorbed some of those costs, but cannot absorb them all. We also need to balance rate limits against a range of new proposals in the LTP which the Council believes are worth investing in. We need public input on these, plus feedback on several other projects that have been included as unfunded items, such as new aquatic facilities for Mosgiel and lighting for the University of Otago Oval.”

Amendments to the Local Government Act have changed the way LTPs are developed and consulted on with the community. Past long term plans have involved first producing a full draft plan which was then put out for public consultation and feedback. Under the new system the DCC is required to produce this consultation document which sets out the issues the city is facing and the options for managing them. Key issues include putting the Stadium on a more achievable financial footing, tackling the city’s ageing infrastructure and addressing low economic growth.

The consultation period will be followed by hearings and deliberations in May and a final LTP will be adopted by the Council in June.

A range of supporting documents and an online submission form will be available at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/ltp from 7am on Saturday (today).

Contact Dave Cull Mayor of Dunedin on 477 4000. DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
25.3.15 DCC Long Term Plan: Green-dyed chickens home to roost
24.3.15 Noble property subdivision —DELTA
23.3.15 Noble property subdivision: “Denials suggest that we have not learned.”
12.3.15 Snaky Stedman —not answering … questions ratepayers must ask
4.3.15 DCC internal audits
20.2.15 Audit NZ making up for previous huge inadequacies over DCC books ?
21.1.15 Dunedin City Council to set rates WAY ABOVE….
14.1.15 DCC Draft Long Term Plan: more inanity from Cull’s crew pending
18.12.14 DCC: Deloitte report released on Citifleet #whitewash
21.11.14 Stadium Review: Mayor Cull exposed
19.11.14 Forsyth Barr Stadium Review
3.11.14 DCC: What happened to $20 million cash on hand? #LGOIMA
31.10.14 Whaleoil on “dodgy ratbag local body politicians” —just like ours at DCC
28.5.14 DCC: Audit and risk subcommittee
31.3.14 Audit services to (paying) local bodies #FAIL ● AuditNZ … LynProvost
26.2.14 DCC: New audit and risk subcommittee a little too late !!

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image source: DCC


Filed under Business, Corruption, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, Democracy, Design, Disinformation, DVL, DVML, Economics, Enterprise Dunedin, Fraud, Geography, Heritage, Highlanders, LGNZ, Museums, Name, New Zealand, NZRU, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Stadiums, Stupidity, Urban design, What stadium

DCC 2GP (district plan): Residential parking + Medium density housing

A flyer received this week at Pitt St…. (the photo is lower Scotland St)

DCC residential parking survey flyer Oct 2014

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Surveying Views on Parking

This item was published on 21 Oct 2014

The Dunedin City Council wants to hear what the public thinks about possible changes to how parking is managed in areas close to the CBD. Areas include City Rise, residential streets near the campus, the Warehouse Precinct, and around Lower Princes Street, Smith Street, York Place and Harrow Street.

Under a review of Dunedin’s District Plan, the DCC is looking at whether the number of off-street car parks required for dwellings in these areas should be reduced. “While this would make more space available for inner city living and could improve neighbourhood amenity, it would also mean more demand for on-street parking,” says City Development Manager Anna Johnson. “To manage this, the DCC may make changes to how parking is managed, with more on-street car parks in the affected areas being reserved for residents with permits or for visitors parking for up to two hours. This would mean that fewer on-street parks would be available to commuters,” says Ms Johnson.

Before any decisions on these matters are made, an online survey will query what the general public, affected residents, commuters, developers, businesses, schools, and other affected organisations think. Survey results will then be used by the DCC to help decide how parking in the affected areas should be managed. If any changes are proposed to District Plan rules for off-street parking, people will be able to make submissions on these changes next year, when the reviewed District Plan is notified. Any changes to these rules would not be likely to come into force until 2016.

In most of the affected areas, changes to on-street parking would only be proposed after the changes to District Plan off-street parking rules had taken place. However, where on-street parking pressure is already particularly high changes may be considered earlier. This could include, for example, areas around Royal Terrace, Heriot Row, London St and Cargill St and parts of City Rise, such as around Arthur Street. If any changes to on-street parking are proposed there will be formal consultation and people will be able to make submissions on the proposals.

█ Online surveys will be available from Wednesday 22 October to Friday 7 November from http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp and paper surveys are available on request from the DCC. Please call 03 477 4000 to request a hard copy to be sent in the post.

Contact Anna Johnson – City Development Manager on 03 474 3874.

DCC Link


Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Medium Density Housing Zones Identified

This item was published on 21 Oct 2014

The growth in one to two person households in Dunedin has prompted a rethink of how we look at residential development. As part of the development of the Dunedin Spatial Plan and the city’s second generation District Plan (2GP), Dunedin City Council staff have been working with stakeholders and experts, and consulting with the community, to identify areas that should provide for medium density housing, particularly in areas close to centres, public transport, and community and recreational facilities.

Medium density relates to how many residential units there are per section. Medium density housing can be in the form of houses on small sections, semi-detached or terraced houses, or two to three storey apartment buildings on larger sections. Much of South Dunedin and the residential areas around the University of Otago are examples of areas that are developed to a “medium density” level.

DCC City Development Manager Anna Johnson says various ideas about where to provide medium density housing have been tested through different stages of consultation. As a result of that feedback and further field work, a final set of areas to be included in the 2GP, to be notified in the first half of next year, has been proposed.

Many of these areas are already zoned for, or developed as, medium density housing, but some new areas have been identified to cater for a predicted growth in demand for different housing types. From this week, owners and occupiers in areas of medium density zoning will be given a chance to see what is proposed in these areas and to provide feedback on the key draft Plan provisions.

Ms Johnson says the need to identify such areas reflects Dunedin’s changing demographics. “The city’s largest demographic growth area is one to two person households, which includes couples with no children at home. These so-called empty nesters often want to make a move to warm, low maintenance forms of housing in their existing neighbourhoods. We need to ensure the city’s planning rules have scope to do that.”

The proposed medium density zones would require a minimum site size of 200m2 for subdivision. In terms of existing sites and newly-subdivided sites, 45m2 of land would be required for each ‘habitable room’, which equates to a room that is, or could be, a bedroom. Providing all performance standards related to the building were met, this would allow, for example, a four bedroom house, or two semi-detached residential units with two bedrooms each, to be built on a 200m2 site.

Research by DCC planning staff and public submissions on the 2GP point to the need for medium density housing in areas where there is good access to public transport, community facilities and green spaces. There are 23 areas that have been identified for medium density zoning. Five of these may need infrastructure upgrades if significantly more development occurred. The 23 areas include areas that are already zoned medium density, areas where development is at a higher level than is currently permitted and areas that might benefit from redevelopment to improve the range and quality of housing available. It also includes areas where there is a market for more housing choices, where some change in housing types can occur without a major impact on existing amenity values.

Neighbourhoods already zoned for medium density (residential 2, 3 and 4) include areas below the Town Belt, around the University campus and parts of Caversham and Mosgiel. Areas where there is already quite a lot of medium density housing include parts of Mornington, City Rise, the Gardens area and North East Valley. In some suburbs, such as Opoho, Roslyn, Belleknowes, Andersons Bay, Waverley and parts of Caversham, residential 1 zoning currently restricts building to a minimum 500m2 site, but there is a market for more housing choices.

“We believe medium density housing could be provided for, with appropriate design standards, in areas like these without significant impact on the amenity values of the area,” Ms Johnson says. “Ultimately we want to spread the options for medium density housing across the city and not just be focusing on older areas that may be perceived as less desirable. We want people to have choices as they get older. Not everyone who wants to live in an apartment or low maintenance home wants to live in the central city. People want choices in their own neighbourhoods and there is a growing demand for quality smaller homes in our popular suburbs.”

In addition to the medium density housing zones, a further eight areas are proposed to be zoned as heritage residential zones, but with density and plan provisions similar to those for medium density zones.

█ From Wednesday, visit http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp for more details and to fill out a survey on medium density housing. Consultation closes on Friday, 7 November.

Contact Anna Johnson – City Development Manager on 03 474 3874.

DCC Link

● ODT 24.10.14 Plan changes target housing, parking

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Hot air, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Stupidity, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

DCC considers sale of “149 properties”

Tomorrow’s ODT carries carefully arranged details…

Kevin Taylor [odt.co.nz tweaked by whatifdunedin] 1blkKevin Taylor, City Property “good, bad and ugly” manager

Updated post 19.9.14 at 11:29 a.m.

### ODT Online Fri, 19 Sep 2014
$10m property sell-off possible
By David Loughrey
Houses, empty sections and parkland are among 149 parcels of property across Dunedin being considered for sale, as the city council looks to add $10 million to its coffers. The council released its “work in progress” list after a Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act request from the Otago Daily Times. […] Council infrastructure and networks general manager Tony Avery yesterday said the list was a starting point.
Read more

News conferred last week:
█ Cr Lee Vandervis now sits on the DCC Audit and Risk Subcommittee. [ Minutes ]

Related Posts and Comments:
15.9.14 Cull’s council spent the cash
11.9.14 DCTL: New treasury manager
1.9.14 DCC Fraud: Further official information in reply to Cr Vandervis
30.8.14 DCC Fraud: Cr Vandervis states urgent need for facts and the record…
27.8.14 DCC whitewash on serious fraud, steals democracy from citizens
26.8.14 DCC: Forensics for kids
23.8.14 DCC public finance forum 12.8.14 (ten slides)
22.8.14 DCC: Deloitte report referred to the police #Citifleet
7.8.14 DCC issues shoddy treatment to Caledonian Bowling Club
● 30.7.14 Dunedin City Council | Consolidated council debt
● 28.4.14 DCC loses City Property manager in restructuring
24.1.14 Stadium: It came to pass… [stadium review]
14.10.13 DCC: New chief financial officer
21.3.13 DCC: Opportunity created by Stephens’ departure
6.3.13 Carisbrook: Cr Vandervis elaborates
20.11.12 Dunedin City Council vs Anzide Properties decision…
9.6.12 City Property to compete more obviously in the market…

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: odt.co.nz (tweaked by whatifdunedin) – Kevin Taylor blackened, a bit


Filed under Architecture, Business, Carisbrook, DCC, DCTL, Democracy, Economics, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Stadiums, What stadium

DCC issues shoddy treatment to Caledonian Bowling Club

223 Andersons Bay Road [DCC webmap]223 Andersons Bay Road [DCC webmap – click to enlarge]

Dunedin City Council loves PROFESSIONAL RUGBY more.
The Council wants to sell 223 Andersons Bay Road. The property is leased to the Caledonian Bowling Club; the 20-year lease expired in 2012 and has been renewed annually since. “The 2013 accounts of the bowling club would be the envy of most social and sporting clubs in Dunedin.” (Harry Love)
Here’s the collide with Forsyth Barr Stadium and dire opportunity cost. South Dunedin loses again. Venal thinking on the part of the Council.

Supplied. ODT 6.8.14 (page 25)
ODT 6.8.14 Letters to the editor Adie p25

The Caledonian Bowling Club and its associated social hub should not be a casualty of the Dunedin City Council’s squeeze on debt, writes Harry Love, of Dunedin.

### ODT Online Wed, 16 Jul 2014
Community institution feels the pinch
By Harry Love
There is a fat bird in the Dunedin City Council nest that swallows most of the food and, no doubt quite unaware that it does so, pushes some of the smaller, skinnier chicks out altogether. […] The question, like all political questions, is one of priorities. I propose, then, to describe the impending demise of one victim of the newcomer’s voracity and to raise some questions about the priorities the DCC, as guardians of the nest, might consider. […] Firstly, the DCC is burdened with large debt, a fair proportion of which is attributable to the Forsyth Barr Stadium and which it is commendably searching for ways to reduce. Secondly, while there is no direct or formal link between stadium costs, as such, and individual victims of the DCC’s need to retire debt, it is indisputable that, in the fiscal space available, small and apparently unimportant entities are pushed out by the big one.
Read more

█ More comments including news and video at Rugby stadiums not filling #SkyTV (from 16 July).

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under Architecture, Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Heritage, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZRU, ORFU, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Stupidity, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

DCC Transport Strategy and Riccarton Road

### ODT Online Tue, 3 Jun 2014
Transport strategy must respect personal needs
By Phil Cole
Dunedin has its own unique geographic, demographic and historical features that make any transportation planning in the city reliant on forward-thinking, rather than academic theoretical practices. The historical past of Dunedin’s transportation, however, should only be ignored at its peril. It is vitally important for Dunedin’s direction that any long-term transport planning is determined not by short-term populist ideas but by long-term growth, based on economic conditions, city development and people’s habits. It is equally important council land-use planning is closely aligned to, but does not determine, how the city can be rejuvenated.
Read more


Riccarton Rd resident Brian Miller said the council was not trying to reach a fair and reasonable settlement and valuations were being forced on landowners.

### ODT Online Wed, 4 Jun 2014
Offers prepared for land
By Shawn McAvinue
The land needed to widen Riccarton Rd will be obtained by statutory authority if a mutual agreement can not be met, Dunedin City Council roading projects engineer Evan Matheson says. […] Some landowners were hesitant to make land available, he said.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under Business, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Media, Name, NZTA, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design