Tag Archives: Preservation

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Awards @Wall Street mall

This year’s Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award winners will be announced later this week at Wall Street mall.

The Awards celebrate excellence, innovation and sensitivity in the re-use of heritage buildings in Dunedin and include categories for earthquake strengthening, interiors and overall re-use. A student design competition is also held during the year, which challenges students to develop innovative solutions to the re-use of Dunedin’s older buildings.

If not invited to the Awards Ceremony check out the exhibition during shop hours. The board display is located near Marbecks cafe and the Lifts at Wall Street. [● Inconveniently. the exhibition closed on the night of the Awards, Wednesday 26 March]

Enticements. Here’s a selection of student ‘re-use’ studies for the Athenaeum in the lower Octagon, taken by cameraphone on Friday. The building is owned by entrepreneur Lawrie Forbes.

Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141658-1Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141458-1Athenaeum IMG_20140321_142640Athenaeum IMG_20140321_142906Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141614-1Love the (lowrise) tower, it accents the building successfully for functional and community use.

The Awards are judged by a panel that includes Dunedin City Councillors, representatives from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, the local branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand, and building owners.

█ This year’s Award winners are revealed here.
The names of last year’s Award winners are listed here.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Owen Graham, heritage advocate

Owen Graham [odt.co.nz] re-imaged 3

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Wins and the odd loss in preservation game
By Rosie Manins

Owen Graham, of Dunedin, counts the preservation of the Athenaeum Library in the Octagon as one of the highlights of his six years as the Otago-Southland area manager for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust.
Longtime heritage advocate Owen Graham hopes his grandchildren will benefit from his work to preserve Otago’s history.
Mr Graham recently ended his six-year tenure as the Otago-Southland area manager for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT).
The Dunedin resident spent about 26 years before that in a similar role for the Department of Conservation, and said going into the corporate industry after more than three decades working for the Government was a refreshing change.
His work to advocate the values of heritage throughout the region was often met with opposition and was not without controversy.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
9.4.13 DCC sells Athenaeum, 23 The Octagon
9.6.12 City Property to compete more obviously in the market…
17.1.12 DCC living beyond its means [all spending and debt not declared]
21.2.11 The proactive heritage development lobby EXISTS in Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: odt.co.nz – Owen Graham, re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

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RMA and Key’s right-wing slashers

BACKWARD STEP: Our environment is at risk if the Resource Management act is watered down.Anton Oliver [stuff.co.nz]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/07/2013
Gutting the RMA – it’s time to be concerned
By Anton Oliver
Source: Sunday Star-Times
OPINION | The Resource Management Act (RMA) has sadly become a much maligned and misunderstood piece of legislation: a kind of universal public punching bag – if mentioned in conversation, it is almost obligatory to put the slipper in. To most Kiwis it represents bureaucracy and inefficiency – pen-pushing do-gooders and paper shufflers who engage us in excessively long and costly processes that get in the way of us Kiwis doing stuff.
In fact the RMA – passed in 1991 – was a means of rectifying mistakes and providing at least some environmental and social integrity to development and planning process. It was recognised by legal minds to be a world-leading piece of legislation. It protected our environment and our economy based on the premise of sustainable resource management. What’s more, it was politically robust in that it received the blessing of both major parties.
It also gave New Zealanders a chance to be heard and it facilitated local decisions made by local people. While the country’s environmental indicators such as water quality and biodiversity loss have still gone backwards – the RMA has stemmed what would otherwise have been fatal haemorrhaging.
Similarly, the RMA has protected a set of fundamental Kiwi values: the notion of fairness and equity in regard to everyone having a right to their say; industry and other activities being required to take responsibility for avoiding, remedying or mitigating adverse environmental impacts; and developments being required to have regard to effects on such things as recreation, scenic values, private property rights, and the public’s access to rivers, lakes and beaches.
That’s all about to change.
The Government plans to alter the Act to give greater weight to economic development over environmental considerations, granting to itself the right to veto any issue. You don’t have to be legal-minded to see the impact of subtle word changes. While the consideration for the “benefits” of a project remains, gone are any references to the “costs”, making a cost-benefit analysis redundant because environmental “cost” is out of the equation.
Gone, too, are the words: “maintenance and enhancement of amenity values”. That’s basically any recreational activity – walking, running, swimming, fishing, kayaking. Who likes doing that stuff anyway? Thankfully the “importance and value of historic heritage” stays. But its cobber, “protection from inappropriate subdivision and development” gets the boot – making the first clause meaningless. And my personal favourite, “maintenance and enhancement of the quality of the environment” has been politely asked to leave. Clearly such an unruly clause has no place in a legal act that’s trying to protect the environment.

The Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Jan Wright, has a different interpretation. She thinks the changes “muddy the overwhelming focus of the RMA, to protect the environment, and risk turning it into an Economic Development Act”. Similarly alarmed, the architect of the RMA, Sir Geoffrey Palmer, concludes: “The [proposed changes] will significantly and seriously weaken the ability of the RMA to protect the natural environment and its recreational enjoyment by all New Zealanders.”

The changes also grant considerable new powers to central government, giving it the ability to take individual consent decisions away from local councils and place them in a new national body. The changes go further still, by allowing government the right to insert provisions in local council plans without any consultation.
Read more

● Former All Black Anton Oliver is an ambassador for Water Conservation Order NZ.

Related Posts and Comments:
21.4.13 *fashionable* Heritage Dunedin and the RMA holocaust
17.3.13 RMA Bill: Public meeting 21 March
6.7.12 Recommended changes to RMA explode environmental protection

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: stuff.co.nz – Anton Oliver

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Cities: Organic renewal

St Joseph - Buchanan County Courthouse [commons.wikimedia.org]St Joseph -  Downtown cnr Francis St and North 4th St [commons.wikimedia.org] 1St Joseph - Downtown skyline 2006 [commons.wikimedia.org] 1St Joseph, Missouri

### Citiwire.net Fri, July 5, 2013
Organic Renewal: St Joe’s Story
By Roberta Brandes Gratz
In the mid- and late 1960s, while many cities and towns were still tearing their hearts out for the false promises of urban renewal, all sorts of people, young and old, saw the beauty, value and promise of gracious living in historic buildings in the places left behind by suburban development. From San Francisco to Louisville to Providence to Brooklyn to St Louis and beyond, urban pioneers stripped, cleaned and restored the irreplaceable artifacts of bygone eras of quality and taste.
Those pioneers were the vanguard of the regeneration of neighbourhoods and cities that, today, many people do not remember were considered a blighted lost cause. Washington’s Georgetown. Park Slope in Brooklyn. King William in San Antonio. The Garden District in New Orleans. The Victorian Districts of San Francisco and Savannah. Who remembers that those neighbourhoods were once considered “blighted,” over, finished?

Surely, this is the most compelling storyline of the second half of the last century. The rebirth of today’s thriving cities started with the rediscovery of yesterday’s discards. That, as they say, is history. But history has a funny way of repeating itself. Today, one finds examples of that organic renewal process re-emerging.

Many cities have lost more than what remains of the authentic architecture on which to build a new momentum. Miraculously, one that survives with an amazing rich legacy to work with is St Joseph, Mo.
Set on a bend in the Missouri River and almost equidistant from Kansas City and Omaha, St Joseph was a railroad, lumber and banking centre and, most importantly, the last full provisioning point for the Westward Expansion in the mid-nineteenth century. It’s the birthplace of the Pony Express, the site of Jesse James’ demise, home of Stetson Hat, Saltine crackers and Aunt Jemima.
St Joseph is still home to a diverse assortment of agriculture-related industry. The past and present combine to offer new opportunities, and a small but growing group of adventurous entrepreneurs appear to be present to lead the way, like the urban pioneers of 50 years ago.
Read more

● Roberta Brandes Gratz is an urban critic and author of The Battle For Gotham: New York In the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, 2010, Nation Books.

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Dunedin - South Princes St (2007), watercolour by Elizabeth Gorden-Werner

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Grants Scheme for Central City Heritage Buildings

This item was published on 05 Jul 2013.

The DCC now has $90,000 available in grants for heritage building re-use projects in Princes Street and areas adjoining the Warehouse Precinct. Like the Warehouse Precinct scheme, this new grant scheme is focused on a specific geographic area to facilitate and expand the regeneration occurring there already. There has been good success with targeted incentive schemes in the Warehouse Precinct. Expanding into the areas around it recognises that the precinct is not an island, but is integrated with the areas around in and with the central city as a whole.

There is already some great work stirring regeneration in the area and it is important we are also poised to assist and encourage others to participate in this regeneration of the area south of the Octagon.

Applications can be made for support for a range of activities, from earthquake strengthening and facade restoration to assistance for businesses and creative industries in the area. The scheme allows building owners to build on the growing positive private sector re-use and investment in the area, such as the Chief Post Office, former BNZ and Standard Building restoration projects already or soon to be underway.

The scheme is supported by Resene Paints which is offering discounts on paint and free colour advice. Resene Otago Trade Representative Henry Van Turnhout says, “We are proud to be offering our support to another DCC area-based project, as we have for King Edward St and the Warehouse Precinct. We are also offering free assistance with colour selection as we recognise how greatly appropriate colour choice can influence the way a building – and an area – looks.”

Taking an area-based approach to regeneration and incentives encourages businesses and building owners to work together and to recognise the benefits for the entire area of re-using or improving their building.

Applications are open immediately, on a first come first served basis. Application forms will be sent to building owners, residents and businesses owners in the next week and are at www.dunedin.govt.nz/heritage

Last year’s Warehouse Precinct grants scheme supported 11 re-use projects in the area. Information about these is available at here.

Contact Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner on 477 4000.

DCC Link
ODT: DCC boost for Princes St regeneration

Dunedin - Former Gresham Hotel IMG_9518 (2)Dunedin - Speight's IMG_0586 (2)Dunedin Central Fire Station, Castle St 2 [commons.wikimedia.org]Dunedin. In future years, the council plans to use this approach in other parts of the central city and beyond.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (from top) commons.wikimedia.org Tim Kiser – St Joseph, Missouri (2006): Buchanan County Courthouse, Downtown cnr Francis St and North 4th St, Downtown viewed from the east near cnr 10th and Charles. Dunedin: South Princes St (2007 watercolour by Elizabeth Gorden-Werner), former Gresham Hotel at Queens Gardens, Speight’s (Lion Breweries) on Rattray St; commons.wikimedia.org Benchill – Dunedin Central Fire Station, Castle St.

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Dunedin’s former Chief Post Office

Dunedin Chief Post Office [topnews.net.nz]

### ODT Online Sat, 22 Jun 2013
Post office conversion ready to go
By Hamish McNeilly
A multimillion-dollar project to transform the former Dunedin chief post office has been delivered. Work on converting the 10-storey heritage building into a 120-apartment hotel and office space for Silver Fern Farms and other commercial tenants could begin within weeks.

Dunedin Chief Post Office [distinctionhotels.co.nz]Building owner Geoff Thomson, of Distinction Hotels, told the Otago Daily Times: ”I just love the building and it was just about trying to find a way to make it stack up”.

Arrow International would spearhead the fit-out of the office space and hotel and the construction of a multilevel car park at the rear of the building. The four-star plus Distinction Dunedin hotel project would cost more than $15 million, but those involved with the project declined to confirm a figure.
However, the anchor tenancy of Silver Fern Farms, which would occupy the first two floors, and unnamed commercial tenants the third floor, would help to ”underpin the building”, Mr Thomson said.
The commercial floors would be fitted out by the end of the year. Construction of a three-storey car park on its Bond St car park at the rear of the building would also be done by then. Designs had yet to be finalised for the remaining seven floors of the hotel apartments.
Read more

[history and significance]
New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) registration report: http://www.historic.org.nz/TheRegister/RegisterSearch/RegisterResults.aspx?RID=2145

Related Posts and Comments:
[updates on SFF] 16.3.10 Public meeting: planning the future of Dunedin heritage buildings
2.7.12 Demolition by neglect. Townscape precincts.
6.12.11 Distinction Hotels: more work on former Chief Post Office
5.3.11 Former Chief Post Office, Dunedin – magazine feature . . .
14.8.10 No surprises with former CPO redevelopment
27.5.10 Distinction Dunedin: former chief post office
12.5.10 DScene – Geoff Thomson buys back former CPO
11.5.10 DCC Media Release – Chief Post Office
10.11.09 Dunedin public library services
23.10.09 Weekend ODT looks at The Exchange
3.9.09 Dunedin Public Library feasibility
26.8.09 DScene: Delta, STS, DCC larks
20.7.09 DCC + former CPO + others(??) = a public library (yeah right)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Dunedin Chief Post Office, 283 Princes Street, Dunedin
(top) topnews.net.nz, (thumbnail) distinctionhotels.co.nz, (1930s b/w) rootsweb.ancestry.com

Dunedin Chief Post Office 1930s (2) [rootsweb.ancestry.com]

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Prof Claudio Modena | Open Lecture Wednesday 1 May

New Zealand Historic Places Trust and New Zealand Society of Earthquake Engineering public talk

Professor Claudio Modena — “Retrofit of stone masonry buildings”
Italian research and practice

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) and the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering (NZSEE) present a public talk by Italian earthquake engineering academic and consultant, Professor Claudio Modena.

When: Wednesday 1 May 2013 at 5:30 pm

Where: University of Otago, Quad 2 Lecture Theatre
1st floor Geology Building, Dunedin

All welcome

****

Claudio Modena 2Claudio Modena is a Professor of Structural Engineering at the University of Padova, Italy (1994–). He has presented the course of “Structural Problems of Monumental Historical Heritage” in Architectural and Building Engineering and is Director of the Masters course in ‘Structural Restoration of Historic Monuments and Buildings’.

Author of over 200 papers in international journals and attendances at conferences, Claudio Modena is interested in analysis and design of construction, with particular attention on:
- masonry of historical and monumental structures
- strengthening/retrofitting in seismic areas
- retrofitting of metal and masonry arch bridges, and
- safety evaluations.

The professor has maintained a balance between academic and practical experience, combining with mutual benefit both research work and technical consulting. Most of his consulting activity is in the field of restoration and conservation of historic masonry structures.

Claudio Modena is a member of several technical and scientific committees: Cultural Heritage Ministry, Protection of Cultural Heritage from Seismic Hazard Committee. He is currently a member of the High Risks Committee – Seismic Risk Sector of the national Civil Protection Agency and of the special committee established by the Ministry of Infrastructures and Public Works for re-drafting the national codes system related to structural safety of both new and existing structures.

Visit this website for more information about the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Inc www.nzsee.org.nz

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin’s existing building stock

Standard Building Before (Hazelton)1Standard Building Before

Standard Building March 2013 (Hazelton)1Standard Building March 2013 (Images: Glen Hazelton)

Email received.

—– Original Message —–
From: Glen Hazelton
To: City Planning ; EMT (Executive Management Team) ; Council 2010-2013 (Elected Members)
Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 6:59 AM
Subject: Standard Building Update

Hi there everyone

For those of you who have not noticed this already – the scaffolding is down on the former Canton/Standard Building in Princes St. Externally, only the ground floor work to go now – inside is also starting to look just as amazing. See the before and after to see just how much you can transform a building perceived a few years back as having little value by many.

This work is a testament to the tenacity and passion of the owner (Ted Daniels) and also the skill and craftsmanship of Daniel Pollard, who unfortunately passed away without seeing the finished project. The project has also been proudly supported by the Dunedin Heritage Fund and DCC Heritage Rates Relief. A great example of just what can be achieved in our city when people put their minds to it.

Regards

Glen Hazelton
Policy Planner (Heritage), City Planning
Dunedin City Council

****

### ODT Online Tue, 2 Apr 2013
Buildings may be abandoned
By Simon Hartley
Spiralling earthquake-proofing costs could leave some Dunedin commercial property owners owing more on investments than the properties are worth. This raises the possibility buildings could be abandoned, that being the way to lose the least amount of money, a commercial property consultant says.

Dunedin has the third-largest concentration of pre-1976 buildings, about 3900, behind Auckland’s 19,050 and Christchurch’s 5000, according to Quotable Value and local body data collated in a consultation paper by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. Dunedin last year had about 160,000sq m of office space, of which ”at least 10%” will be deemed earthquake-prone, Colliers International national director of research and consulting Alan McMahon said when contacted.

Dunedin City Council policy planner for heritage, Glen Hazelton, said 138 building owners had provided assessments. About 58 were less than 33% compliant and required upgrading. More assessments are expected when owners change use. Upgrades are expected at that time.

One [Dunedin] building owner, who did not want to be identified, said while the council had written to many building owners, many had not yet responded, as the deadline is July next year. Another source said far more assessments had been carried out than reported to the council and it was ”likely they don’t want the assessment put on public record just yet”.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Recommended changes to RMA explode environmental protection

Technical advisory group’s report recommends significant changes to section 6 of the RMA…the proposal to drop the requirement for decision makers to provide for the preservation and protection of indigenous vegetation and habitats as matters of national importance ignores Environment Court case law built up over the last 20 years.

### ODT Online Thu, 5 Jul 2012
Proposed changes reduce RMA protection
By Adam Bennett – New Zealand Herald
A Government-appointed advisory group has recommended a significant rewrite of the Resource Management Act removing references to the protection of coastal areas, wetlands, lakes and rivers and indigenous flora and fauna. Environment Minister Amy Adams released the report from a technical advisory group established after the Canterbury earthquakes with the primary task of looking at natural hazard issues relevant to the RMA arising from the quakes. “After the Canterbury earthquakes, it became clear that consents for subdivisions had been granted without any consideration of the risk of liquefaction,” Ms Adams said in a statement. However, the group’s report addresses much wider issues and recommends significant changes to section 6 of the RMA.

As it stands [section 6] instructs local authorities to recognise and provide for the protection or preservation of the natural character of the coastal environment, wetlands, lakes and rivers when considering RMA applications. They must also provide for the protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes and areas of significant indigenous vegetation or wildlife. Protection must also be provided for historic heritage and protected customary rights while public access to and along the coastal marine area, lakes and rivers must be maintained. However the group’s recommendation proposes removing the words “protection” and “preservation” from the section entirely.
Read more

****

### radionz.co.nz Friday 6 July 2012
Morning Report with Geoff Robinson & Simon Mercep
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport

08:13 Independent report a major assault on the RMA – Opposition
Opposition parties say recommended changes to the Resource Management Act by independent advisory group are a major assault on the sustainable management of the environment. (3′57″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

More reading via Scoop
Greens – Report ‘Major Assault On The RMA’
NZ Govt – Report on Resource Management Act principles released
Labour – RMA changes risk more litigation
ACT – RMA Principles Report Encouraging But More Boldness Required
Maori Party – Māori Party comfortable with direction of RMA report
Fish and Game NZ – RMA rejig a disaster for the environment

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Railway Station clocktower

### ch9.co.nz July 5, 2012 – 7:06pm
The view from the Railway Station clocktower
The Dunedin Railway Station is an Edwardian monument to the era of rail, and the nineteenth century dreams of the city’s early inhabitants. And inside its clocktower are some very cool spaces the public seldom gets to see. Nine Local News squeezed through some tight manholes and got very dusty to bring those spaces to you.
Video

Image: Channel 9

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Demolition by neglect. Townscape precincts.

About which, belated (after parapet failure) “buying of engineering opinion” can make sure historic buildings come down for car parks.

On Friday, Karen Ratten of St Kilda had a letter to the editor published (ODT 29.6.12), ‘Why the long delay in demolition?’. Ms Ratten is firstly concerned about three car parks being currently unavailable for use outside Brocklebanks Building in King Edward St, South Dunedin. She then asks why the hold up with the building’s demolition?

The question could have been, why is demolition of the listed building required at all (the building has facade protection in the district plan and is located in a listed townscape precinct) – if it’s to create interim on-site parking? Given it was (still is!) possible to tie the building together and restore it, or retain the historic facade and erect a new building behind – thereby removing the public safety issue altogether.

DCC’s Alan Worthington, Resource Consents manager, provides reply including an inference (we’re way past generalities here, Alan) that archaeological authority processes required by New Zealand Historic Places Trust for the building have contributed to delay of demolition. This is not so. He then intimates something more useful, saying: “At the same time there may be other matters the building owner is dealing with.” Bingo. Just maybe, the Brocklebank family trust hasn’t finalised building plans in order to apply for resource consent. Who knew!

The other site…

### ODT Online Sat, 30 Jun 2012
Buildings’ demise imminent
By Debbie Porteous
Scenic Circle Hotel Group director Stuart McLauchlan confirmed a crane that went up behind the N. & E.S. Paterson Ltd and Barron buildings in Rattray St this week would be bringing the partially demolished buildings down within “days”. Two separate sections of the 136-year-old Barron Building collapsed in January 2011, and parapets fell on to the roof causing it to collapse inwards on to the second storey.
Read more

The Barron Building, originally known as the Banks, Barron & Co. Building, was designed by architect Henry F. Hardy, and constructed circa 1875. The Victorian-era warehouse later received a very fine interior by architect Owen E. MacFie. The first bottling plant for Speights was housed in the basement (still intact) – potentially, a stunning adjunct to Speight’s Alehouse and heritage tours.

According to specialist engineers the Barron Building could have been saved following collapse of the parapet.

Keeping up a building of this scale is not usually prohibitive, cost wise – it does require diligence. It can ‘come down’ to having motivated owners and investors.

Long before parapet failure, Barron Building required conscientious owner-stewards to carry out cyclical maintenance (seeing to weathertightness, gutter cleaning, keeping pigeons out, removing vegetation and trees from mortar, repointing and so on) and regular structural assessment towards enhancing building performance – with all resulting work to be costed and carried out in stages (at its most affordable – given that for many many years Dunedin City Council has practised leniency towards building owners in regards to bringing buildings up to code).

All the people saying pull the old buildings down because they’re “eyesores” (see ODT news report above) and asking why private building owners should be put to the cost of saving old structures like these – the answer, respectfully, is that they need to get out a bit, to see for themselves what’s actually going on in the neighbourhood.

Building owners (good investors), with vision and means, are set on maintaining, strengthening and upgrading their heritage buildings. Their efforts are attracting higher paying tenants; and incrementally/cumulatively they are raising property values in the old CBD. It’s known as “regeneration”. If you’re a building investor who isn’t participating in this upward movement (where’s your diligence?) and your property is going backwards, you need to ask yourself what’s the sense in being left behind? Get educated. Those caring for heritage building stock are starting to make real money now and for the long term. They’ve done their sums, they know what it takes.

A sizeable cluster of Dunedin’s historic buildings in the area have been, or are in the process of being strengthened and re-used. They include (no particular order): Old BNZ Bank, Standard Building, Old National Bank, Bing Harris Building, Clarion Building, Bracken Court (Moray Pl), Queens Garden Court, NMA Building (former Union Steam Ship Co, Water St), former Rogan McIndoe Print Building (Crawford St), 14 Dowling St, Garrison Hall (Dowling St), former Stavely Building (cnr Bond and Jetty Sts), Wood Adams Building (19 Bond St), former Chief Post Office, former Donald Reid Store (Vogel St), Milne Brebner Building (Vogel St), 366 Princes St… and more besides.

Again, WHY are we losing the likes of Barron Building, N. & E.S. Paterson Building, and Brocklebanks Building?

If you are a heritage building owner wanting to access available information that could help you conserve, strengthen and save your building, contact Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage) phone 4774000 – or Owen Graham, NZHPT Area Manager (Otago Southland) phone 4779871.

****

### ODT Online Tue, 7 Sep 2010
Measures urged to protect heritage buildings
By John Gibb
Relatively cheap and simple measures can protect many of Dunedin’s heritage buildings from much of the kind of earthquake damage evident in Christchurch, structural engineer Lou Robinson says.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
8.5.12 Owners of neglected buildings
25.8.11 180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition…
12.4.11 Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
19.2.11 Owner of Dragon Café/Barron Building has lodged an application…
26.1.11 D Scene: Honour heritage
22.1.11 SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Earthquake strengthening: voluntary targeted rates scheme

### ODT Online Thu, 26 Jan 2012
New rate to fund strengthening
By David Loughrey
The Dunedin City Council gave approval for a second “targeted rate” system to improve city buildings yesterday when it voted for a scheme to help fund earthquake-strengthening for heritage building owners. That followed a decision on Tuesday to back a similar scheme to fund insulation and clean heating for residential buildings.
Read more

The voluntary targeted rates schemes work by providing finance to ratepayers – in this case to complete earthquake-strengthening – with the cost to be paid off through rates over a specified period.

• There would be about $500,000 available in the first year.
• Applications would be considered by the four city councillors on the Dunedin Heritage Fund, and three New Zealand Historic Places Trust representatives, with a final decision by the council finance, strategy and development committee.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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‘Brocklebank building’, 189-195 King Edward St, South Dunedin

189-195 King Edward St, South Dunedin, owned by the Brocklebank family trust, is listed as item B363 in Schedule 25.1 (Townscape and Heritage Buildings and Structures) of the Dunedin City District Plan. The protection required is the facade to King Edward St.

This is yet another of Dunedin’s historic commercial buildings which, over the years, have suffered from a lack of regular maintenance and repair to maintain structural strength. Thus building safety and performance have been compromised. Despite being tenanted (until recently), the building has been neglected to such an extent the street facade has begun to peel away from the structure behind.

The fact of the building’s listing is reason enough for the resource consent application to be notified by Dunedin City Council. This will give interested parties a chance to comment on the owner’s proposal.

A recent survey of photographic archives suggests the date of build is c.1883, or possibly earlier.

An ideal project for Dunedin Heritage Fund assistance: preserving the facade to King Edward St.

### ODT Online Mon, 16 Jan 2012
Delays frustrate trust
By Mark Price
The owners of the condemned Brocklebank Drycleaners building in the main street of South Dunedin are frustrated at a five-month wait, so far, for approval to knock down the building. In August, the Dunedin City Council demanded the building be emptied of its tenants and fenced off, because the facade was unsafe.
Read more

Related Post:
13.8.11 Building facade failure: “It’s only the facade at the front that can’t be used”

In Marc Price’s Saturday magazine feature on South Dunedin it’s interesting to read that historic heritage is being given prominence in the city council’s ‘urban design’ project…
http://www.odt.co.nz/lifestyle/magazine/194344/south-dunedin-steaming-ahead

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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NZHPT National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund

The NZHPT national heritage preservation incentive fund helps owners with the maintenance of Category 1 registered properties.

### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2011
Restoration funding for historic properties
Oliver’s Restaurant, in Clyde, and Woodside, in Dunedin, have received New Zealand Historic Places Trust funding for restoration work.
Oliver’s received $35,000 from the NZHPT contestable national heritage preservation incentive fund to strengthen and repair the former Naylor’s General Store roof on the property.
Woodside [pictured below], in Lovelock Ave, North Dunedin, received $40,000 to replace wooden joinery and the slate roof.
Read more

New Zealand Historic Places Trust
NZHPT National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund
NZHPT Registration Summary – Woodside (Category 1)
NZHPT Registration Full Report – Woodside (Category 1)
Francis Petre – architect (Wikipedia)
Francis Petre – architect (Dictionary of New Zealand Biography)

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Barlow Justice Valuers / New Zealand Historic Places Trust—Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012

Background and purpose
Dunedin’s unique look and feel is, in part, defined by its large number of historic and heritage buildings. Heritage interiors are a very important, but sometimes overlooked, part of Dunedin heritage. Ensuring restorations and adaptations of heritage building interiors respect and re-use existing heritage features and fabric is an important part of ensuring their future survival.

Barlow Justice Valuers and the NZ Historic Places Trust wish to recognise and highlight the achievements of building owners who have undertaken sympathetic restoration and refurbishment to interiors of Dunedin’s older buildings. The Dunedin Heritage Interiors Award recognises successful, and appropriately sympathetic interior restoration or upgrade projects.

The Award is administered by the DCC and may be given annually to building owners or developers who have, in the opinion of the judging panel, undertaken the most innovative and sympathetic heritage building interior upgrade and/or refurbishment project in the city.

General Information
Individuals or organisations may nominate their own or others’ buildings for consideration. Projects should reflect a commitment to the retention and re-use of interior features and building fabric. Eligible projects will have had work completed in the 12-month period to 1 December 2011.

The Award consists of a certificate and a cash prize of $1500,
which is awarded to the property owner. A certificate will also
be awarded to the interior designer/s.

Download Award information here:
Barlow Justice – NZHPT Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012 (PDF, 493 KB)

Barlow Justice Valuers
New Zealand Historic Places Trust

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Otago Settlers Museum – Burnside Building (site visit)

The newly refurbished Burnside building at the Otago Settlers Museum will be open to the public for a “sneak peek” tomorrow, from 2pm-4pm.

### ODT Online Sat, 5 Nov 2011
Public offered ‘sneak peek’ of upgrade
By John Lewis
A glass ceiling, more than three tonnes of new steel work, and a state-of-the-art temperature control system are just some of the refurbishments at the Otago Settlers Museum designed to “reinvigorate” the display of Otago’s heritage.
Read more

Otago Settlers Museum
31 Queens Garden, Dunedin 9016
Phone: 03 477 5052
Fax: 03 477 8360
Email: osmmail@dcc.govt.nz
www.otago.settlers.museum

One of New Zealand’s most significant social history museums, established in 1898, recording the past lives and times of the people and communities of the Otago region. Founded to mark the 50th anniversary of the settling of Dunedin.

Its comprehensive historical collections consist of everyday objects, costumes and textiles, art, photographs, transport and technology, and it holds extensive local history archives.

Housed in purpose-built Edwardian art galleries linked to the Category 1 Art Deco ex-NZR bus station.

The museum is CLOSED until late 2012 for redevelopment. A wide range of talks, performances, walking tours and workshops continue, see website for details.

Learn more about the museum redevelopment here.

Site plan of building redevelopment (PDF 1.3 MB)

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180 Rattray St, Dunedin — former P. Hayman & Co. Building (1872)

North Princes Street/Moray Place/Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03)

Correction: The council received 12 submissions on the application.

### ODT Online Tue, 11 Oct 2011
Demolition hearing delayed
By Chris Morris
A 19th-century central Dunedin commercial building has been granted a temporary reprieve from the wrecking ball, after an application to demolish it to make way for a car park was placed on hold. However, building owner Lincoln Darling said when contacted yesterday he planned to proceed with the application next year, and nothing had changed. Mr Darling had sought resource consent to demolish the former Furniture Court Building at 180 Rattray St and replace it with a rental car park until another development opportunity arose.

• “Obviously, you do look at submissions … if they [submitters] want to chat with me I’m quite happy to talk to them about their concerns.” -Lincoln Darling

• New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago-Southland area manager Owen Graham, in his submission, argued the “deficient” application lacked a detailed heritage assessment.

• Mr Darling said he had contacted Mr Graham last week to arrange a meeting, but had no views on his submission as “I haven’t even read it”.

Read more

Related Post, Comments and Recent Correspondence:
25.8.11 180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition…

Lincoln Darling and friends might like to attend the DCC Workshop for heritage building owners on Wednesday, 23 November.

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Facebook: Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage

Local heritage advocates have recently created ‘Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage’ at Facebook.

We want to see Dunedin’s built heritage remain upright, and for it to be kept up the right way: sensitively, sustainably and safely.

This page is here for us all — to share our opinions, knowledge, perspectives and love of this city. We can all benefit from the sharing of information and through this, develop a greater appreciation for our surrounds, and explore the potential for their enhancement.

Dunedin’s strong commercial and industrial past as the first city of Aotearoa New Zealand shapes our streets, skylines and even our psyches. It’s not solely the grand commercial buildings of the Exchange area, the awe-inspiring cathedrals and the stately houses perched on the hills that are significant, but also the lesser-noticed buildings that are equally worthy of recognition and preservation. To lose these to neglect, demolition or insensitive redevelopment is an affront to both our past, and our future.

Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage
See interesting Notes, Photos, and comments at the Wall.

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Workshop for heritage building owners – 23 November

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Oct 2011
Heritage building workshop planned
By David Loughrey
Communication between Dunedin building owners and the city council is strengthening, as the council works to help owners find ways to re-use the city’s stock of heritage buildings.

The council’s second annual one-day workshop for heritage building owners will be held on November 23. The theme this year is “After Christchurch: What to know about owning an older building”, with the free workshop targeting owners of non-residential buildings.

The first workshop, an initiative of the council’s heritage buildings economic re-use steering group, attracted more than 80 people last November, with numbers bolstered by concerns following the first major Christchurch earthquake. Council heritage policy planner Glen Hazelton said strong interest was expected again.
Read more

7.10.11 DCC Media Release

To register or for more information contact Glen Hazelton 477 4000 or ghazelto@dcc.govt.nz

Workshop Highlights
• Speakers include Jason Ingham, from the University of Auckland and co-author of a report for the Canterbury Earthquakes Royal Commission entitled ‘The Performance of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings (URM) in the 2010/2011 Canterbury Earthquake Swarm’, Alan Race (Crombie Lockwood) on insurance matters, and Lou Robinson (Hadley Robinson) on earthquake strengthening.

• The New Zealand Historic Places Trust and Dunedin City Council will provide presentations, with the DCC outlining its new Earthquake-prone Buildings Policy and the range of incentives available to heritage building owners to assist earthquake strengthening.

• Steve Macknight of Steve Macknight Strengthening and Design and Lawrie Forbes of Zeal Steel, will conduct site visits to earthquake strengthening projects.

Workshop for Heritage Building Owners Information Flyer (PDF, 219.6 KB)

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Milwaukee regeneration project: The Brewery

### switchboard.nrdc.org Posted September 22, 2011
A spectacular green neighbourhood is brewing in Milwaukee
By Kaid Benfield (Blog)
Milwaukee’s newest trendy neighbourhood is likely to become one of its best, and almost certainly its greenest. The Brewery, an environmentally sensitive restoration and adaptation of historic structures among the decaying wreckage of the former Pabst Brewing Company, is already home to striking residential lofts, a great beer hall, a range of offices, Cardinal Stritch University City Centre, and a small urban park. Soon it will add a senior living facility and the School of Public Health of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Look for more residential and commercial presence, including a boutique hotel, retail and restaurants, over time.

The Brewery, when built out (courtesy of The Brewery)

The seven-block, 20-acre project [plans] involved the restoration and adaptive reuse of an amazing 26 structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places, surely making it one of the most ambitious historic preservation projects in the country. It also involved extensive brownfield cleanup; had a great location within walking distance of Milwaukee’s downtown; planned aggressive use of green infrastructure to manage stormwater; planned to set aside some apartments for qualifying low-income families; and included standards for high-performing green buildings.

The site before construction (image by Jeramey Jannene)

The Brewery was also strongly supported by the city government in what has been the largest public-private partnership in Milwaukee’s history. When the site is fully built out, it is expected to include at least 300 homes and some 1.3 million square feet of office and retail property.
Read more

-Kaid Benfield writes (almost) daily about community, development, and the environment.

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Training, jobs, city regeneration

Register to read D Scene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

### D Scene 5-10-11
Celebrating restoration
By Owen Graham
The Larnach Tomb restoration project, like others, needed the specialist skills of a stonemason and stained glass artist to ensure a high standard of preservation. The quality of work is there for all to see and, in a city with as much heritage as Dunedin, is a reminder that there ought to be many more opportunities for skilled trades and crafts people, and for these skills to be nurtured and passed on. There is work waiting to be done in heritage restoration projects. {continues} #bookmark

• Owen Graham is the New Zealand Historic Places Trust area manager Otago/Southland

Related Post: 17.9.11 Larnach Tomb restoration

Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of New Zealand Photos* + More

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Larnach Tomb restoration

The Northern Cemetery at Dunedin is registered by New Zealand Historic Places Trust as a Category I historic place.

### ODT Online Sat, 17 Sep 2011
An inspired restoration
By Charmian Smith
The most striking memorial in Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery once again soars proudly heavenwards after years of neglect, vandalism and desecration. After seven years in the planning and 18 months’ work, Larnach’s tomb in the Northern Cemetery is looking pristine with restored finials and crosses, new window tracery and stained glass, new doors and wooden floor – all replicas of the originals.

Stewart Harvey, chairman of the Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of New Zealand, instigated a conservation report in 2006. By early last year he had raised $345,000, initially with a grant from the Dunedin Heritage Fund. Other sources contributed: the Lottery Grants Board, Heritage and Community Trusts, Southern Trust and Macmillan Trust, and work was able to start.
Read more + Images

• (via ODT) William James Mudie Larnach, banker, businessman, politician, government minister, and builder of the grandiose house, The Camp, now known as Larnach Castle, on Otago Peninsula in the early 1870s, built the mausoleum in 1881 as a memorial to his first wife Eliza Jane Guise.

• Official opening
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull will officially open the restored tomb today at 1pm.

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Historic preservation

### americancity.org 17 March 2011
Next American City: Buzz
Misunderstanding Historic Preservation
By Johanna Hoffman
Of all the design disciplines, historic preservation is perhaps the most misunderstood. While it’s widely accepted that architects design our buildings, and planners organise our cities, the role of preservationists merits less appreciation. Popular culture abounds with clichés of the preservation zealot – there’s the gray-haired old lady laying herself down in front of an oncoming bulldozer, the guy dedicated to rescuing decrepit buildings and saving historical artifacts, and the Not-In-My-Back-Yard types preventing economic development at every turn.
Read more

-Last year, the New Zealand Historic Places Trust hosted Donovan Rypkema (mentioned in the article) on a three-city tour, including Dunedin. He presented public lectures at the Old BNZ in Princes St and on campus; and met with city leaders and business people.

****

Related Posts:
19.2.11 Dunedin, are you ‘of a mind’ to protect Historic Heritage?
28.12.10 Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus / Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle
21.9.10 Storm Cunningham: Champion of the Restoration Economy
14.9.10 DCC Media Release: Dunedin’s Heritage Buildings
8.1.10 Eco-upgrade for Europe’s largest brick building

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Letter from Christchurch 2 #eqnz

UPDATED

Today’s Press has more examples of high-handed action.

The Piko Whole-Foods Co-op store – an important social and architectural landmark – had its top storey removed before the owners knew what was going to happen. The heritage team at Christchurch City Council worked with the owners to try and stop the demolition but the top floor had already gone by the time they got there and its landmark value has been completely destroyed. The building had been earthquake strengthened within the past few years and though it did have some serious damage it is far from clear that it was beyond repair.

It had the misfortune to be sited on a major intersection of the one way system and we all know that free movement of cars must be put ahead of buildings. There was absolutely no question of people being in the building and thorough shoring up should have ensured public safety.

There is some sort of process for group 1 & 2 listed buildings, plus NZHPT registered buildings – a cursory sort of report by the heritage planners (they are so overwhelmed that the reports are completely perfunctory) – and a report from the NZHPT and/or council engineer, but the Civil Defence Controller has the final say.

I am not sure that NZHPT is fighting too hard anyway from what I can gather – because people have been killed (mainly in modern buildings) they seem to have taken the view that they can’t push hard for heritage.

If the owner can be identified (not always easy) they might be given 24 hours notice so have a chance to argue for a delay. If buildings are unlisted and simply make an important contribution to the character of a precinct, no process is required at all. Nothing at all can be done to try and avert demolition.

There seems to have been some agreement made between Civil Defence and the council staff involved with Civil Defence, that no cordons to protect the public from buildings needing repair will be put in place if they would encroach into a road – as long as they take that view not much will be saved.

As a result of tonight’s meeting a delegation of heritage advocates and business people are going to try and meet the Civil Defence Controller tomorrow to urge a slow down, but whether they will even be granted an appointment is far from certain.

We are meeting again on Friday to plan our next steps, especially if the appeal to the Controller fails to have any impact. The scary thing is the Government can just keep on extending the state of emergency.

{Letter received by What if? on Tuesday, 8 March 2011 11.24pm. Names removed to protect identities. -Eds}

(9.00am) What if? learned the group has been granted a meeting today with the Civil Defence Controller.

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Bathgate was right in 1888 about city apathy

He berrated the city often on the nature of apathy and was very hot on “larrikins and butcher’s boys”

The Conservation of Heritage and Landscape in Dunedin
Posted by: daseditor | January 27, 2011
On the 11th of September 1888 Dunedin lawyer Alexander Bathgate read an address to the Otago Institute entitled “The development and conservation of the amenities of Dunedin and its neighbourhood”. The address was the catalyst for the foundation of the Dunedin and Suburban Reserves Conservation Society, the forerunner of the Dunedin Amenities Society. Bathgate outlined a vision for Dunedin that was so detailed in its construction that he apologised to his audience for “frightening you by the extent and magnitude of my programme”. What Bathgate outlined was both the protection of the existing natural landscape and the enhancement of the urban built environment in the developing city. It was a vision that blended the conservation of native biodiversity and landscape with the call home syndrome of “practical and prosaic colonists”.
From the blog of The Dunedin Amenities Society (read more)

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