Tag Archives: Pedestrians

Green Island town centre : Say No to Council Red Tape

Green Island is a revitalising service centre peppered with new tenancies and *excellent* eateries. All in all a worthwhile destination. Just make sure, Green Island people, that DCC does not overtake your ideas with theirs (see King Edward St, South Dunedin, where council blight has occurred)…. so to kill your lovely Upbeat shopping centre. YOUR Plan, not theirs. Don’t let councils over-design your main street (avoid road engineering aesthetics) —keep everything simple and spontaneous, a People-friendly Place to entice repeat visitors.

green-island-shops-google-street-view-tweaked-by-whatifdunedin-1

A plan to improve traffic flow, intersections, parking, pedestrian safety and bus stops is being developed in Green Island, with community input.

### ODT Online Sun, 27 Nov 2016
Traffic plan for perusal soon
By Joshua Riddiford – The Star
A traffic plan for Green Island is expected to be presented to officials before Christmas Day. The plan is intended to improve traffic flow, intersections, parking, pedestrian safety and bus stops. The Greater Green Island Community Network developed the plan in response to that organisation’s household survey in May, which found 30% of residents were concerned about vehicles dominating public spaces and streets, 21% were concerned about the amount of traffic and 21% were concerned about pedestrian safety.
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### ODT Online Sun, 13 Nov 2016
Green Island traffic plan picks up pace
By Brenda Harwood – The Star
….Greater Green Island believes the time has come for a comprehensive plan, with the recent development of the new Moyles Fresh Choice supermarket, the Z petrol station, the Sunnyvale Sports Centre, a growing population and the rise in traffic volumes. Greater Green Island community workers Amanda Reid and Leanne Stenhouse have been meeting  Dunedin City Council and Otago Regional Council representatives to discuss the issues and are now working on a comprehensive draft design for improvements …. [DCC transportation safety team leader Hjarne Poulsen] said the approach of the community network, to gather feedback and create a concept, was “very helpful” …. [ORC support services manager] Gerard Collings welcomed the community feedback and thanked the network for its “collaborative approach”.
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[click to enlarge]
google-street-map-green-island-2016Google Street Map – Green Island 2016

dcc-webmap-green-island-town-centre-janfeb2013DCC Webmap – Green Island JanFeb 2013

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: Green Island street perspective via Google Street View, tweaked by whatifdunedin

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Tertiary larks squeeze DCC ratepayers for $30,000

“The two [Auckland] firms had been hired to prepare concept plans and options for projects to improve the pedestrian and cycling environment in and around the tertiary campuses. […] This will enable projects to be ‘picked off’ by the various institutions together or individually.” –Susan Lilley, DCC (via ODT)

● Why are DCC, university and polytechnic not buying LOCAL?
● (Student Ghetto) The streets are PUBLIC, aren’t they? Or are they.
● University and polytechnic not paying enough rates?!
● Heaps of other questions?!

Kate Wilson said Chow Hill Architects and Flow Transportation were hired to come up with a plan, at a cost of $88,000, with the city council paying $30,000, and the rest split between Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago. (ODT)

Cr Kate### ODT Online Thu, 7 Aug 2014
Auckland firms work on tertiary streetscape
By Vaughan Elder
Two Auckland firms have been hired to investigate options for a revamp of Dunedin’s tertiary precinct, which could include making some areas pedestrian only. The work on the streetscape in the tertiary precinct is being overseen by the “tertiary precinct planning group”, which includes representatives from the Dunedin City Council, Otago Polytechnic, University of Otago, Otago Regional Council, Otago Museum and Southern District Health Board.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Cr Kate by whatifdunedin

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‘Autopia: road to the future’

### http://www.wired.com March 19, 2010 at 12:48pm
Feds Deem Pedestrians, Cyclists and Motorists Equals
By Jason Kambitsis
At long last, the feds have said the needs of pedestrians and cyclists must be placed alongside, not behind, those of motorists. In what amounts to a sea change for the Department of Transportation, the automobile will no longer be the prime consideration in federal transportation planning. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood says the needs of pedestrians and cyclists will be considered along with those of motorists, and he makes it clear that walking and riding are “an important component for livable communities”.

“People across America who value bicycling should have a voice when it comes to transportation planning,” LaHood wrote on his blog. “This is the end of favouring motorised transportation at the expense of non-motorised.”

When it comes to doling out federal transportation funds, projects that adhere to the new policy statement will be given a higher priority, so it is within the best interests of cities and states to adhere to it.

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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design

Jaywalking and the urban pedestrian

For those of us choosing to be carless…

### Slate Posted Monday, Nov. 2, 2009, at 4:01 PM ET
In Defense of Jaywalking
Banning the practice won’t make pedestrians safer.
By Tom Vanderbilt

Looking at any number of big-city dailies over the last few weeks, one might reasonably surmise that we are in the middle of a new public-health epidemic with an old name: jaywalking.

The very word jaywalk is an interesting—and not historically neutral—one. Originally an insult against bumptious “jays” from the country who ineptly gamboled on city sidewalks, it was taken up by a coalition of pro-automobile interests in the 1920s, notes historian Peter D. Norton in his book Fighting Traffic. “Before the American city could be physically reconstructed to accommodate automobiles, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where cars belong,” he writes. “Until then, streets were regarded as public spaces, where practices that endangered or obstructed others (including pedestrians) were disreputable. Motorists’ claim to street space was therefore fragile, subject to restrictions that threatened to negate the advantages of car ownership.” And so, where newspapers like the New York Times once condemned the “slaughter of pedestrians” by cars and defended the right to midblock crossings—and where cities like Cincinnati weighed imposing speed “governors” for cars—after a few decades, the focus of attention had shifted from marauding motorists onto the reckless “jaywalker.”

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– Tom Vanderbilt is author of Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do, now available in paperback. He is contributing editor to Artforum, Print, and I.D.; contributing writer to Design Observer; and has written for many publications, including Wired, the Wilson Quarterly, the New York Times Magazine, and the London Review of Books. He blogs at howwedrive.com and lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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