Tag Archives: Old buildings

Otago Museum: H D Skinner Annex + returning exhibition!

Otago Museum H D Skinner Annex - from reserve 2### ODT Online Sat, 4 Jan 2014
Museum to keep annex open all year
By John Gibb
Otago Museum is planning to keep its recently redeveloped H D Skinner Annex open to the public throughout the year, to allow increased community use. The recent ‘Heritage Lost and Found: Our Changing Cityscape‘ exhibition, displayed in the Postmaster Gallery at the annex, had been “very well received” by the community. This show, which was developed with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, would now be reinstalled, and, in response to “public demand”, would return to public display from March. Read more

Otago Museum H D Skinner Annex (building background and facilities)

Comment at ODT Online:

Lost and found
Submitted by ej kerr on Sat, 04/01/2014 – 11:03am.

The significance of the recently closed exhibition for local residents and city visitors was perhaps, at the time, under-appreciated by the exhibiting parties. Dunedin City has formerly lacked such an insightful, rational and easily grasped interactive exhibition on the historical layers of the built environment – signposting the form and change to our cultural heritage landscape and urban context, for better or worse since early days.

This is a planned city (thank you, surveyor Charles Kettle) – we should always honour Dunedin’s uniqueness and intricate textures representatively and graphically; know the ‘before and afters’, the losses, additions and discoveries; be able to quickly recount how the cityscape has evolved, with just these type visual aids and new evolving IT. ‘Heritage Lost and Found’ exactly captures the spirit of where we are!

It’s great news the exhibition is set to continue – in a broader sense, the exhibition is something to build on and develop into the future as a permanent visitor display worthy of any sensitive location for public education. It can take special refreshes and add-ons as research into the merits and quirks of the architecture (our collective legacy) continues through the work of New Zealand Historic Places Trust, Dunedin City Council, Otago Museum, related city archives and collections, archaeologists, building owners, researchers, and professional architectural historians of the calibre of Peter Entwisle and David Murray. The combined effort, its coordination, contains so much power, potential and publishing opportunity. Boggles the mind, then there’s the overwhelming ‘pasture’ for design excellence to cover the brief…
[ends]

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Former Dunedin North Post Office [commons.wikimedia.org] Photo by Benchill 27.9.09 (1)Dunedin North Post Office (McCoy and Wixon)Former Dunedin North Post Office before work started, photo by Benchill via Wikimedia Commons. (below) Proposed building redevelopment rendered by McCoy and Wixon Architects, 2012.

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Links to earlier stories copied from another thread:

● ODT 11.7.13 Museum annex set for opening [after delays]
The $1.6 million redevelopment of the former Dunedin North post office as an Otago Museum exhibition area is nearing completion, and the first display is expected to open next month. Titled ‘Heritage Lost and Found: Our Changing Cityscape’, the first exhibition to be displayed at the annexe was developed in partnership with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. The display would showcase “important aspects of Dunedin’s built heritage that have been demolished or redeveloped”.

● ODT 7.7.13 Work near end on old Post Office
● ODT 18.5.13 Museum’s ‘old post office’ annex nearly ready

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image – opening graphic, view from Museum reserve by Whatifdunedin

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*fashionable* Heritage Dunedin and the RMA holocaust

Dunedin Railway Station (nakedbus.com) screenshotCouncil-owned Dunedin Railway Station

### ODT Online Sun, 21 Apr 2013
Council says heritage buildings under threat
By Chris Morris
Important heritage buildings in Dunedin could be lost if proposed changes to the Resource Management Act (RMA) are confirmed, the Dunedin City Council says. The council’s concerns about historic architectural losses were articulated in a submission to the Ministry for the Environment, in response to a raft of proposed RMA changes recently unveiled by Environment Minister Amy Adams.
Proposed changes included the Resource Reform Management Bill, introduced last December, which was before a select committee and had closed a call for public submissions. Among the proposals was the removal of a reference to the ”protection of” historic heritage, which would be replaced with wording requiring recognition of, and provision for, ”the importance and value” of historic heritage.

”Important heritage buildings valued by the community could be lost when insignificant weight is given both to the importance of heritage to Dunedin’s residents, and to the growing significance of the city’s buildings on a national and international level, following the losses in Christchurch.”

Councillors have already been warned uncertainty over key new phrases proposed for the RMA might need to be tested in the courts, and the council’s submission warned the change ”diminishes the importance of historic heritage”.
Read more

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Rosemary McLeod (BayofPlentyTimes)### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/04/2013
City wears its history with pride
By Rosemary McLeod
How can Dunedin fashion have a reputation for Gothic gloom, when early autumn showcases clear skies and a harbour like pale-blue glass and unexpected sunshine roasts me in my pessimistic woollies? The city has turned on idyllic weather for iD Dunedin Fashion Week, from March 10 to 17.
With barely a whisper of wind, reddening leaves dangle in the city’s parks and gardens as if by spider threads, viburnums are a mass of clear red berries, and the hillside of 19th-century stone and brick houses overlooking town declares a rooted solidity among greenery, even if we have all become nervous of such buildings because of what happened in that other city.

Since havoc was wreaked on Christchurch, Dunedin could seem more remote than ever, an add-on at the bottom of that big island, but it has always had its own distinct character and its old buildings are integral to that.

Before Auckland, this was where money was, and lots of it. It was the financial and population hub of the country and it was built to last long before nonsense like leaky homes. Dunedin is what Auckland isn’t.

iD Dunedin Fashion Show 2013 photomerge Protecting Dunedin’s design heritage

If I had my way, it would have a vast dome over it, keeping it like this for posterity, because we have nothing else like it and will never create it again.

I could go on about the past, because it’s all around you in Dunedin, a city with a main street still at its heart, where you can still do your shopping instead of driving to suburban malls, where the local privately owned newspaper seems untouched by media challenges elsewhere and where I’ve trawled the second-hand shops over the years and made great discoveries.

Where populations stay put, so does their stuff. You dig here for a different kind of gold than the prospectors, who brought wealth here 150-odd years ago, but in its own way it’s just as exciting.

There are two museums and one public art gallery, all thriving, for a population of about 120,000. Independent retailers still exist on the main street. There are no vulgar high-rise buildings, although a developer desperately wants to build a 40-storeyed hotel. Yet in the midst of its rather smug history, Dunedin is held together not by the past but the future. Education is its core business.

Like a wise old parent, it puts up with the antics of the students so vital to its economy, stopping short of hysterics when they really put tolerance to the test, which is why, as its Fashion Week shows, Dunedin isn’t fusty.
Read more

● Rosemary McLeod was hosted by Tourism Dunedin.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Images: Dunedin Railway Station via nakedbus.com (top), craiglawson.net (middle), seenindunedin.co.nz (bottom); Rosemary McLeod via bayofplentytimes.co.nz

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Christchurch heritage buildings approved for demolition #eqnz

Canterbury Earthquake
Media advisory – Tuesday 15 March 2011, 1930 hours

Process for approving deconstruction
In the case of heritage buildings, a robust process is followed that involves an assessment by Heritage and by Lifelines (utilities) and an inspection carried out by a suitably qualified engineer.
Every endeavour is being made to contact all owners of buildings if demolition or deconstruction is necessary.
There will be no salvaging of materials in buildings unless it is by the building owner or those contracted to carry out salvage work.

Heritage buildings approved for deconstruction
* Provincial Hotel – 274 Cashel Street
* 112 Centaurus Road – Dwelling
* Cathedral Grammar – Chester Street West 8 (2), Stratham Building
* Austral Building – 603 – 615 Colombo Street (includes 170 Tuam Street)
* Bean Bags and Beyond – 626 (aka 626) Colombo Street
* 625 – 629 Colombo Street – Commercial buildings
* Wave House/Winnie Bagoes – 194 Gloucester Street
* Hereford Court – 116 Hereford
* Piko Whole Foods – 229 Kilmore Street
* Park Lane Handbags – 111 – 113 Lichfield Street
* Former Ridley Building – 116 Lichfield Street
* Nurse Maude – 192 Madras Street
* Charlie Backpacker – 268 Madras Street
* Former City Council Offices – 198 Manchester Street
* Forbes Building – 17 Norwich Quay 17, Lyttleton
* Rhodes Memorial Hospital – Overdale Drive 2
* Edison Hall, Workshop, Witchery – 230 – 232 Tuam St
* Domo – 236 Tuam St
* Fuller Brothers Ltd – 180 Tuam Street
* Addington Flour Mill – 14 Wise Street
* Gopals Restaurant and Pedros Restaurant – 143 Worcester Street

This totals 21 buildings, but note that Colombo Street’s Austral Building also includes 170 Tuam Street and there are multiple buildings included in the Colombo Street addresses
NB: This list differs slightly from the list provided at the media briefing today.

Deconstruction of Addington (aka Old Woods) Flour Mill, 14 Wise St
This deconstruction was triggered by USAR, who recommended the partial or total deconstruction of the building for rescue or recovery purposes or because it presents an unacceptable safety risk from aftershocks.
There are three separate buildings on site that were assessed:

* the mill building itself that has the greatest heritage value,
* a chimney, and
* a brick-clad silos assessed as having a lesser heritage value.

The silos and chimney were badly damaged. The mill building itself was assessed as repairable. The engineer’s report recommended the deconstruction of the silos and the chimney only.
This approved deconstruction sign-off process was followed in this case and the recommendation provided to the National Controller for approval/signature on March 3.

Weblink

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Photograph of quake-damaged Addington mill building
By @Motmunter, Campbell Live cameraman

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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